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Old 2nd July 2007, 05:23 PM   #1
lurer is offline lurer  Norway
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Default Diy from scratch or with readycut materials?

Hello!
This is my first post here, and i haven't started any of my job yet. Haven't even bought anythin, but i need your advice in my planning.
I am wondering on buying a Seas Thor kit and i have two options.
Buy just components and build it up from beginning, or buy ready cut and adjusted material and glue it together myself.
I do not have 10 thumbs, but i have more than two and i have basically no equipment so the total cost of doing everything myself will be atleast as high as if i buy the ready cut material.

How difficult is it to make TL speakers so that i sounds well and looks well? The last part is important in the well known WAF perspective.

I am from Norway and my nick "lurer" = wondering and is fitting well in this situation.

I have read tons about peoples experiences with diykits and tls, but not where i can ask the questions spesifically for my needs.

Thanks for all replies
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Old 2nd July 2007, 06:27 PM   #2
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Ready cut is a lot easier but it really depends on whomever is cutting. Your standard home improvement store can't guarantee accurate cuts. Sometimes you can do a better job with a circular saw and a saw-board (straight edge type of guide).

http://members.aol.com/woodmiser1/sawbd.htm
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Old 2nd July 2007, 06:52 PM   #3
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I agree with Cal Weldon.

Ready cut = fast, easy, almost guaranteed to work the first time.

You cut it all = slower, requires lots of care and a big mess. More rewarding, perhaps, if done correctly since you did ALL of the work.

If you don't have much woodworking equipment and a large space to work, one where you can leave a mess if necessary, I would recommend the kit form.

Best.
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Old 2nd July 2007, 06:52 PM   #4
Petriej is offline Petriej  United States
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Sawboard = brilliant.

Wish I had done that a few days ago! Now I have a bunch of cuts that will need some improvising to keep sealed.


To the OP:

If you have to buy all the tools needed to cut the wood yourself, think about how much woodworking you are going to be doing to justify buying all those tools. Like Cal Weldon mentioned, depending on who is doing your cuts, having someone else cut it may or may not be worth it.
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Old 2nd July 2007, 07:04 PM   #5
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For a simple box you can get away with a circular saw, saw board, jig saw and/or router and a brad nailer.

Use inside corner blocking so you have no exposed fasteners to worry about filling except the back panel.

More intricate boxes will require a few more things.
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Old 6th July 2007, 02:09 PM   #6
lurer is offline lurer  Norway
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Quote:
Originally posted by Petriej

To the OP:

If you have to buy all the tools needed to cut the wood yourself, think about how much woodworking you are going to be doing to justify buying all those tools. Like Cal Weldon mentioned, depending on who is doing your cuts, having someone else cut it may or may not be worth it. [/B]
Hey!
Thanks for all the answers. And well, YES. I would have to justify to myself and my girlfriend all the tools and the mess.

That kit i was talking about is the Acoustic Kit from Sweden. Half the price of the norwegian kit. I do not know how they can sell it that cheap. Maybe it says something about the quality?
The price for the most expensive kit is around $1000.

For a firsttimer, i will be a chicken and buy the kit and glue it together and do the filter myself. English is not my strongest asset so it takes time to learn all the english terms. What is the filter called in english?

It all comes down to money and i'm maybe going back to school i august so if i'm lucky i can manage get some money before christmas.
Thanks for the reply so far, I'm sure i'll be back
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Old 6th July 2007, 02:50 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally posted by lurer


Hey!
Thanks for all the answers. And well, YES. I would have to justify to myself and my girlfriend all the tools and the mess.

That kit i was talking about is the Acoustic Kit from Sweden. Half the price of the norwegian kit. I do not know how they can sell it that cheap. Maybe it says something about the quality?
The price for the most expensive kit is around $1000.

For a firsttimer, i will be a chicken and buy the kit and glue it together and do the filter myself. English is not my strongest asset so it takes time to learn all the english terms. What is the filter called in english?

It all comes down to money and i'm maybe going back to school i august so if i'm lucky i can manage get some money before christmas.
Thanks for the reply so far, I'm sure i'll be back
Hi,

The filter is called a crossover because well, that is what it does. Don't worry about your english, it is much better than a great many who have it as their first and only language.
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Old 6th July 2007, 04:47 PM   #8
BHTX is offline BHTX  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by AudioFreak
Don't worry about your english, it is much better than a great many who have it as their first and only language.
LOL...yeah, I didn't even realize until he said something that he wasn't from the US, or Uk, etc.
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Old 9th July 2007, 06:09 AM   #9
lurer is offline lurer  Norway
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Heheh. Well i guess it isn't that bad after all
Of course its called crossover. I knew that very well, but i seem to have these memory losses sometimes.
Well thanks for your support, i will be back on this thread later when i have got the money to buy the components or the whole kit.
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