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Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

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Old 5th September 2012, 11:46 AM   #7981
Jmmlc is offline Jmmlc  France
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Hello, DrBoar,

No, it is not that company.

The not named company used to sell replica of the Janus loudspeaker under the commercial name Rubanoïde.

This company is more famous among high-end crowd to propose silver wired audiotransformers and high quality components and electronics (battery supply pre and amplifiers...).

Best regards from Paris, France

Jean-Michel Le Cléac'h



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That Swiss version, was that from somthing named similar to MF Akkoustic?
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Old 5th September 2012, 12:57 PM   #7982
Pano is offline Pano  United States
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Originally Posted by buzzforb View Post
We need to do an NC audio thing ie just so I can have an excuse to meet and listen.
Come on over! FWIW, I've tried and tried to get a NC audio get together. Even set up a Google group and mailing list. No luck. No one wanted to do anything. Audionuts are homebodies, but this was very sad.
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Old 6th September 2012, 12:53 AM   #7983
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C'mon out to Cascadia
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Old 6th September 2012, 02:19 AM   #7984
Pano is offline Pano  United States
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LOL. You know I moved here from there. Portland has a good, active audio scene. Seattle very good.
The population of NC is more spread out. The guys in the Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill area seem to get together more than here.
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Old 6th September 2012, 02:26 AM   #7985
ra7 is offline ra7  United States
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I miss NC and Raleigh ... the greenery, the people, and believe it or not, the humidity. It's so dry out here, we have to use a humidifier... eek!

Go Wolfpack!

Last edited by ra7; 6th September 2012 at 02:29 AM.
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Old 6th September 2012, 02:45 AM   #7986
Pano is offline Pano  United States
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It's plenty green and humid here now. The vegetation is about to shallow the house
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Old 6th September 2012, 05:27 AM   #7987
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One thing that's a little surprising about compression drivers is how "touchy" they are. Moving them back and forth a quarter-inch is surprisingly audible, more so than direct-radiators. It has the largest effect on "focus", or in other words, the cohesiveness of the 3D image. There's also a secondary effect on timbre - the image pops into focus, and tone is noticeably better too. Anyone that's ever adjusted VTA on a phonograph with a line-contact stylus will recognize the effect on the sound.

The choice of highpass crossover order (2nd, 3rd, 4th) has an effect on how "relaxed" and unstressed the compression driver sounds. Unwanted out-of-band energy in the 200~400 Hz region leads to that harsh, pinched PA driver sound. I know Altec traditionally used 12 dB/oct symmetrical in the large theater systems, but that was long before the advent of modern filter synthesis and awareness of how to control group-delay with filter design. We can now synthesize low-Q, low-group-delay higher-order filters that have better out-of-band rejection, and also avoid unwanted interaction between narrowband peaks in driver reactance and the filter response.

I believe that good drivers have a "natural" crossover frequency. What sets the "natural" crossover frequency is careful auditioning of the driver and how it responds to small increments in raising and lowering the crossover frequency (this is assuming the phase relationship between HF and LF is kept constant). The 288 has a definite preference for somewhere around 700 Hz, while the 416 sounds good anywhere between 300 and 900 Hz.

Last edited by Lynn Olson; 6th September 2012 at 05:32 AM.
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Old 6th September 2012, 01:51 PM   #7988
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Originally Posted by Pano View Post
Come on over! FWIW, I've tried and tried to get a NC audio get together. Even set up a Google group and mailing list. No luck. No one wanted to do anything. Audionuts are homebodies, but this was very sad.
I think I must have left NC just before you moved there.... bummer. I lived in Seagrove and used to make regular excursions up Greensboro. I would have loved nothing more than to listen to some music and pick your brain on various nerdy subjects....
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Old 6th September 2012, 02:30 PM   #7989
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Joseph:

You moved from NC to WI, I did just the opposite 3 months ago. Loving it here, but sad that all my audio is packed away (just won't fit in the apartment).

Sorry to interrupt the thread.
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Old 7th September 2012, 12:20 PM   #7990
Pano is offline Pano  United States
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ZigZag, I didn't realize you are now in N.C. Hello!

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Originally Posted by Lynn Olson View Post
One thing that's a little surprising about compression drivers is how "touchy" they are. Moving them back and forth a quarter-inch is surprisingly audible, more so than direct-radiators.
You aint kiddin'! It's maddening. But at least they can be brought into sharp focus, unlike direct radiators. Horns are the Formula One of audio. Capable of amazing things, but not for the Sunday driver. It can take a lot of time and work to get it right. But the results are worth it.

An odd problem:
My big Altec horns had been driving me nutty. It was a phase/polarity problem.
Even tho I knew that electrically they were in same polarity, they didn't sound like it. It sounded like one was flipped to opposite polarity, out of phase. Change the polarity on one side, and they sounded right. Impulse response would now show them to be 180 degs out of phase, but the vocals where stronger and better placed. Put them back "right" and vocals would drop out. It just didn't make sense. (The woofers didn't do that at all.) I went 'round and 'round with this, getting more and more frustrated.

Then I remembered that I had aimed the speakers very precisely (with a laser) to cross at a point about 2 feet behind my head. Sitting right in the middle would cause the center image (mostly vocals) to drop way down. Moving a little to the left or right would pop the vocals right back in. WTF?

So I toed in the speakers more. Voila! Center image was back and sweet spot much larger, the space much better defined.

The only thing I can figure is that the horns must have been so perfectly aligned to left-ear/right-ear that whatever was in phase between them just canceled out at my head. Weird. Crossing them further forward fixed it. All good now.
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