diyAudio - View Profile: wakibaki
Go Back   Home > Forums > Members List

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving

wakibaki wakibaki is offline

Banned

About Me

  • About wakibaki
    Country
    United Kingdom

Statistics

Total Posts
Blog
Wiki
General Information
  • Last Activity: 11th June 2011 12:52 PM
  • Join Date: 8th January 2008

Blog

View wakibaki's BlogRecent Entries
Latest Blog Entry

Posted 9th September 2010 at 07:27 PM by wakibaki Comments 0
Posted in Uncategorized
In the earlier post, basic common emitter amplifier design, I made reference to increasing the gain of the amplifier by bypassing the emitter resistor R[SIZE="1"]E[/SIZE].

In this case the gain referred to is the AC gain, which is the signal gain, and which is the gain we are primarily interested in with regard to audio amplifiers. The gain previously calculated was the DC gain, which was numerically identical to the AC gain, but since the amplifier was decoupled from the preceding stage with a capacitor, there was no DC applied to the transistor other than that provided by the bias network, which set the standing current to 1mA and the output voltage to 10V. DC gain and offset is important, because a decoupling cap can be avoided in some cases, but not here.

In the earlier post the gain was stated to be R[SIZE="1"]C[/SIZE]/R[SIZE="1"]E[/SIZE]. This was a simplification, and, more strictly the gain is R[SIZE="1"]C[/SIZE]/(R[SIZE="1"]E[/SIZE]...

Posted 28th August 2010 at 08:43 PM by wakibaki Comments 0
Posted in Uncategorized
The amplifier is probably the single most important composite circuit element in electronics. Certainly such familiar devices as radios and music systems would be impossible without amplifiers. The very large majority of amplifiers these days are solid state, that is, they use transistors. While there are many types of transistors, the first mass-produced transistors were BJTs, or bipolar junction transistors, and understanding transistor amplifiers, for most people, begins with these.

The transistor has three terminals and can be arranged in three basic amplifier configurations, the common emitter, common base (or grounded base) and common collector or emitter follower amplifiers.

Common base amplifiers are not commonly employed at lower frequencies as, amongst other reasons, they have a low input impedance, although they can be found in amplifiers for e.g. moving coil microphones. They are sometimes employed as current buffers, having a current gain of 1,...
Hide this!Advertise here!

New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 12:40 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2