When and where did the usage of 'My bad !" start - diyAudio
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Old 10th November 2014, 09:08 AM   #1
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Default When and where did the usage of 'My bad !" start

When we we were taught English we were told that if we made a mistake we had to say , 'I made a mistake' or 'It's my mistake' . In the 80's I heard some Japs say 'My bad' and corrected them and told them that it should be 'my mistake' and not 'my bad'.

However after a few years when the Net came along I find more and more people saying 'My bad'. It sounds funny. Like we say 'my bad dog' or 'my bad thoughts'. If you drop the last word it sounds funny. 'My Bad'....Bad what ?

So who started it? Certainly not in England I think. The Americans ? Or the Japs who sent it to America ? Hearing ' my bad' sounds like someone saying' My happy' or 'my good' ......Funny huh ?
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Old 10th November 2014, 09:36 AM   #2
Mooly is offline Mooly  United Kingdom
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I had never come across the term until a couple of years ago and only then through seeing it on here. I agree though. My bad, my bad what ! You probably did as I have done and swiped it in Google,

grammaticality - Is "my bad" a correct English phrase? - English Language & Usage Stack Exchange

I smile at a lot of phrases on here... "stop harshing my buzz" was one of them I thought it meant that one was having trouble with a ground loop. Apparently not
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Old 10th November 2014, 10:00 AM   #3
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I think they actually mean my FU, maybe too embarrassed to say it directly.

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Old 10th November 2014, 10:07 AM   #4
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One time I used the expression "suck it and see" on this forum and was told that would earn me a punch in the face.

From Google:
suck it and see
phrase of suck

  1. 1.
    British informal
    used to suggest that the only way to know if something will work or be suitable is to try it.
    e.g. "for other baits, and for different waters, it is a case of suck it and see"



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Old 10th November 2014, 01:46 PM   #5
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"Suck it and see" was around long ago I think. Those days it didn't mean anything off beat !
But humans progressed and started sucking a lot of new things and suddenly it didn't always quite mean what it should have. Could generate a 'slap' under certain circumstances ! Ouch.......! MY BAD ! " Ha....HA.... !
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Old 10th November 2014, 02:39 PM   #6
Turbon is offline Turbon  Sweden
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The first time I heard it in the middle of 90'es were from Indian folks. Been a few trips to Spore and Hongkong as well but didn't heare it there.

But it's ok with "My bad", languages evolve as anything else - just learn to handle it.

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Old 10th November 2014, 05:33 PM   #7
DF96 is offline DF96  England
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"My bad!" is not English. It may be American. However, I can confidentally predict that British youngsters will start using it, if they haven't already, as they tend not to distinguish between different versions of our language family.

When I first saw it used (online) it was by someone who did not have English as a first language, so I just assumed he was making a mistake. I understood what he meant, so we were communicating, and I don't expect perfect English in this situation. Some months later, I saw Jennifer Aniston use it in a film (when driving?) so I realised that it may have become an Americanism.

The correct (British) English phrase is "Sorry, my mistake!".
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Old 10th November 2014, 05:46 PM   #8
kevinkr is offline kevinkr  United States
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It's just a cute American colloquialism, and means nothing more, at least around here than a humorous: "sorry, I made a mistake." One common usage here is: "Oops, my bad" usually delivered with a smile.. I am not sure when I first saw it or heard it, but something like a decade ago seems about right. The first time I ever heard it used was by a somewhat hip friend. It arrived here pretty early too, diyA may have been the first place I saw it written.

Some pretty funny and good definitions here: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=My+bad (Note in local usage here it is usually taken as an apology and some sort of remedial action is usually the result, but not always..)
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Old 10th November 2014, 06:01 PM   #9
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I read that it was a professional basketball player who came from another country to the US, to play in the NBA. He hadn't learned English very well, and whenever he made an awful playing error, he tried to express the thought "sorry teammates, that was MY mistake." Lacking a big English vocabulary, he said "my bad!" instead. Find it endearing and goofy, his teammates copied the expression. Soon it spread to other teams, other sports, and to general usage.

Anyway that's what I read.
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Old 10th November 2014, 06:51 PM   #10
Turbon is offline Turbon  Sweden
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Narrow are we? There is a whole world outside yes doorstep enrichening your mother tongue but might the problem be that it might come from the outside? It's a very small planet so ones mothers tongue changes a lot in a century.

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