Denuding electrolytic caps - diyAudio
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Old 15th August 2014, 09:47 AM   #1
greg7 is offline greg7  United States
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Default Denuding electrolytic caps

I'm not sure if this is the correct term for cutting the outer jacket off electrolytic caps, but is it worth it sonically? Has anyone tried this? I've seen it done on occasion but google searches didn't provide any information
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Old 15th August 2014, 10:17 AM   #2
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Old 15th August 2014, 11:20 AM   #3
marce is offline marce  United Kingdom
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Sorry to sound rather derisive but how on earth would this affect the sound quality, it is these rather way out silly ideas that do not help the world view of Audiophiles, moving the toe in of your speakers by 0.1mm would have more effect...
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Old 15th August 2014, 11:21 AM   #4
Gopher is offline Gopher  United Kingdom
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It's supposed to improve sound for some reason best known to audiophools, but, back in the real world, I read somewhere that removing the sleeve puts the cap under greater thermal stress, thereby shortening its life, because the shiny can radiates heat away less efficiently than the (usually) darker sleeve.

There's also the issue of electrical shorts without a sleeve - isn't the can connected to the power supply voltage?

Who knows? I'd leave as is if I were you.

Last edited by Gopher; 15th August 2014 at 11:28 AM.
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Old 15th August 2014, 12:07 PM   #5
raul_77 is offline raul_77  Europe
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[Aluminium electrolytic capacitors housed in aluminium cases are supplied with a plastic oversleeve, which serves two purposes, it is easily printed with capacitance and voltage etc., but more important this sleeve actually dissipates heat more rapidly than does the bare aluminium can, so must never be removed. When I first worked designing electrolytics, like many people I queried this fact, so performed several practical test measurements of capacitors specially assembled with thermocouples to measure
internal temperatures. Subjected to 50Hz test current, I measured the internal hot spot temperature of each capacitor after 3 hours, initially complete with its plastic sleeving then having removed this sleeve, retested each capacitor. In every case the sleeved version was several degrees cooler. Researching my reference books I found the answer, the low temperature infra-red radiation from the semi-polished aluminium cans was significantly lower than that from the near mat surfaced thin plastic sleeving.]

The text is from Cyril Bateman:

Capacitor Sounds, Speaker Cables and Crossover Inductors.
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Old 15th August 2014, 02:25 PM   #6
johnr66 is offline johnr66  United States
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There is/was a good video on YouTube where two identical pop cans were filled with warm water. One of the cans was covered with the non glare type scotch tape. You would think the one covered in tape would cool more slowly having the extra layer of plastic and adhesive, however it cooled more rapidly as the tape made the can a better black body radiator. Using one of those far infrared cameras, you could see how adding the tape made the can brighter emission wise.
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Old 15th August 2014, 05:37 PM   #7
Gopher is offline Gopher  United Kingdom
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Is there an echo..echo.. in here?
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Old 15th August 2014, 05:58 PM   #8
DF96 is offline DF96  England
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The plastic sleeve may also serve to dampen any mechanical resonances in the capacitor. Any change in sound when it is removed is therefore likely to be a reduction in sound quality. Reductions in sound quality are often misinterpreted as improvements in sound quality, especially when the listener has been told to expect an improvement or when the listener doesn't actually like hi-fi.
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Old 15th August 2014, 06:06 PM   #9
GOR3 is offline GOR3  United States
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Doesn't the sleeve also help to keep the electrons in or, for transistor circuits, the holes?
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Old 15th August 2014, 06:39 PM   #10
johnr66 is offline johnr66  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GOR3 View Post
Doesn't the sleeve also help to keep the electrons in or, for transistor circuits, the holes?
In deed it does. I also use permanent markers. Green is best on caps over 10mf.
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