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Old 25th April 2013, 09:41 PM   #21
DF96 is offline DF96  England
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Jan asks scientists to stop being boring, perhaps with tongue in cheek.

I have met very few boring scientists, as science itself is so interesting that it attracts people with interesting ideas. Non-scientists may find them boring, but that is mainly because they lack the knowledge to understand the science. I do remember two very boring scientists, but they stood out because they were the exception. People with knowledge and ability are rarely boring

One thing which does puzzle me is when people ask for an explanation but then stop the explanation about halfway through the second (or third) sentence, perhaps claiming boredom. No amount of skill in putting things in layman's terms seems to stop this phenomenon; they seem to not want to listen to an explanation which they could understand (at some level) and which they have requested.
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Old 25th April 2013, 09:50 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by mr_push_pull View Post
@Choco:
could be.
I must have a multiple personality - let me count...
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Old 25th April 2013, 09:57 PM   #23
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You are absolutely right, Mr push-pull. It takes an 'open mind' and most engineers, (and many physicists) don't have it.
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Old 25th April 2013, 09:59 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DF96 View Post
One thing which does puzzle me is when people ask for an explanation but then stop the explanation about halfway through the second (or third) sentence, perhaps claiming boredom. No amount of skill in putting things in layman's terms seems to stop this phenomenon; they seem to not want to listen to an explanation which they could understand (at some level) and which they have requested.
yes!
friend asked me about how come bits are not just bits.

I stopped for a minute and reflected. there I was, facing the idea of having to explain the notions of recovered clock, PLL etc to a guy who likely won't have the patience to sit through it. then how do you do it? you just don't.

I remember the time (I was 14 I think) when I built this TV "modulator" (that's how they called them) for my ZX Spectrum. took composite as input and provided RF modulated output (we did not have TVs with composite input back then). it had a 1uF electrolytic paralleled with a 1nF mica at the output. I asked my then-guru how come a cap having gross tolerances was paralleled with a 1/1000 one. obviously, he said "well, just build it that way"

Quote:
Originally Posted by DF96 View Post
I have met very few boring scientists, as science itself is so interesting that it attracts people with interesting ideas. Non-scientists may find them boring, but that is mainly because they lack the knowledge to understand the science.
I had this friend who was exceptional at math. my sister kinda fell for him the first time they met made me think "A Beautiful Mind" was in fact more realistic than one would expect
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Last edited by mr_push_pull; 25th April 2013 at 10:04 PM.
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Old 25th April 2013, 10:08 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by DF96 View Post
One thing which does puzzle me is when people ask for an explanation but then stop the explanation about halfway through the second (or third) sentence, perhaps claiming boredom. No amount of skill in putting things in layman's terms seems to stop this phenomenon; they seem to not want to listen to an explanation which they could understand (at some level) and which they have requested.
I think the request of explanation is often based on a spontaneous 'why'-impulse.
But their brains are already working on to many other complicated things, which are rated more important.
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Old 25th April 2013, 10:15 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by ChocoHolic View Post
I think the request of explanation is often based on a spontaneous 'why'-impulse.
But their brains are already working on to many other complicated things, which are rated more important.
like not getting hit by a car
yes it's information overload too.

sometimes I think the notion of "why" is the biggest gift and at the same time biggest curse of human mind.
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Old 25th April 2013, 10:53 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Rodeodave View Post
Ohhh, I got a good one fer ya.

I once read that you have to regularly subject cables to DC...you know, to replace the old electrons, with fresh ones...
I remember spreading that a year or two ago.

You see, electrons have mass and that means they can sink through the atomic lattice of the copper (or silver), forming deposits at the bottom.
Electrons are very light, so their downward velocity is small, but certainly there: Newton's Law of Gravitation says this must be true.

So, the electrons pile up like sand dropping out of water.

Of course, you could just turn the cables over, allowing gravity to reposition them. This, however, introduces its own set of problems when all those electrons move through the atomic lattice, all at once: they would disturb the flow of those electrons moving horizontally in response to the AC signal of music, resulting in a degrading of sound.

The solution here is to create a constant current flow along the cables. This, like stirring the water with sand in, will get the electrons mixed more thoroughly with the lattice, and replace any old/tired ones.
The result is a more homogenous and organic sound, with a touch more low end heft once the old electrons have been replaced.

Buy it now for only £999.99



Chris
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Old 25th April 2013, 11:42 PM   #28
sonidos is offline sonidos  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DF96 View Post
Jan asks scientists to stop being boring, perhaps with tongue in cheek.

I have met very few boring scientists, as science itself is so interesting that it attracts people with interesting ideas. Non-scientists may find them boring, but that is mainly because they lack the knowledge to understand the science. I do remember two very boring scientists, but they stood out because they were the exception. People with knowledge and ability are rarely boring
Likewise. I am far from being a scientist and I am a software test engineer. I find novel ways to break perfect code. But I have enjoyed the company of scientists, even when the discussion is way over my head.

I recall fondly that I signed up for a woodworking course at a local fine woods store around 1992 or so. I was thoroughly prepared to meet old woodworking pros. As it turned out, it was a large group of professors and scientists, and one Motorola engineer. It was a bit of a surprise but they were genuinely nice and even took a very close look at some items I had produced in my garage that I took to the class. I ended up having a very good time hanging out with them and learning about woodworking.
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Old 26th April 2013, 12:02 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by DF96 View Post
I have met very few boring scientists, as science itself is so interesting that it attracts people with interesting ideas... People with knowledge and ability are rarely boring
I can't agree with this. In my opinion interesting people also have to have scepticism in everything. A scientist who purportedly had the most original ideas on quantum physics would immediately be revealed to be the most boring man on earth if he spent more than £10 on an audio cable. Because it would reveal that his curiosity didn't extend beyond a narrow field, and he was prepared to accept any old twaddle another 'expert' fed him. Give me 'Renaissance' people who are curious and sceptical about everything.
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Old 26th April 2013, 12:58 AM   #30
tomchr is offline tomchr  United States
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Originally Posted by CopperTop View Post
OK I've got an interesting one for you.
http://www.hificritic.com/downloads/...C_Quad2805.pdf

Esteemed hi fi reviewer Martin Colloms says this in his review of the Quad 2805 ESL:
Quote:
Halfway through the listening, we thought we had got the measure of this review ESL, and then I got round to turning off the illuminated Quad badges. Operating in an admittedly high resolution reference system, powering down the panel logo had a quite dramatic effect on the sound quality, removing a certain colouration that I can only liken to the twang of a stretched plastic bag.
What lessons can we take away from this?
That some HiFi reviewers are full of crap.... Was this a randomized, double or triple blind test? Of course not. The reviewer turned off the annoying badge (probably illuminated by an equally annoying blue LED) and said it sounded better. Did the sound quality actually change? Or did the reviewer's perception of the sound quality change because he was no longer distracted by an annoying illuminated logo? Maybe he took a break, turned the logo off, and it sounded better because he wasn't suffering from listening fatigue. Did he try turning the logo back on to see if the sound quality would degrade? Probably not.

I bet the reviewer was really annoyed with this completely useless feature and wanted it gone. What better way to do that than by comparing the sound quality of a mega-buck high-end speaker to that of a stretched plastic bag.

~Tom
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