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Trileru 27th February 2013 09:43 PM

Graphene capacitor
 
Hello everyone :cheers:

I've been hearing a lot lately about the graphene capacitor. I must admit I find it intriguing but I can only understand so much about it. I've seen the clips as a layman and I'd like to know...how does that translate for our beloved Audio hobby? :) I've seen some processes that enable you to diy it...at home!
I am interested if it can be easily produced for specific values, if the industrial process will be expensive, if it will overthrow the "old" style caps... Would it be a good candidate for audio use, high capacitance, low impedance?
I still don't know if it can hold a charge over a long period of time, maybe it's applications will be something like replacing recharging batteries etc
How will the current companies adopt the technology and what would be the most desirable areas where this would make the most dramatic change in our everyday lives?

I'd love the input of skilled people here, it will be interesting once it shows up for consumer use.
Some videoclips on this subject:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OtM6XJlynkk
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_oEFwyoWKXo

Trileru 27th February 2013 11:46 PM

Another great thing about graphene: very low resistivity at room temperature. Lower than Silver as I read somewhere. Amongst many others, that means longer speaker cables and nicer transformers :)

gootee 27th February 2013 11:48 PM

Researchers develop new technique to scale up production of graphene micro-supercapacitors

"The UCLA researchers have developed a groundbreaking technique that uses a DVD burner to fabricate micro-scale graphene-based supercapacitors..."

"... Instead, we used a consumer-grade LightScribe DVD burner to produce graphene micro-supercapacitors over large areas at a fraction of the cost of traditional devices. Using this technique, we have been able to produce more than 100 micro-supercapacitors on a single disc in less than 30 minutes, using inexpensive materials."

"The process is straightforward, cost-effective and can be done at home," El-Kady said. "One only needs a DVD burner and graphite oxide dispersion in water, which is commercially available at a moderate cost."

tvrgeek 28th February 2013 07:34 PM

What you don't notice is these are very small devices. The use is of course, cell phones. The picture was pretty cool of this floppy gold colored disk full of little squares. They said nothing about any of the specifications.

Trileru 28th February 2013 08:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gootee (Post 3389054)
Researchers develop new technique to scale up production of graphene micro-supercapacitors

"The UCLA researchers have developed a groundbreaking technique that uses a DVD burner to fabricate micro-scale graphene-based supercapacitors..."

"... Instead, we used a consumer-grade LightScribe DVD burner to produce graphene micro-supercapacitors over large areas at a fraction of the cost of traditional devices. Using this technique, we have been able to produce more than 100 micro-supercapacitors on a single disc in less than 30 minutes, using inexpensive materials."

"The process is straightforward, cost-effective and can be done at home," El-Kady said. "One only needs a DVD burner and graphite oxide dispersion in water, which is commercially available at a moderate cost."

I wouldn't put liquid on a DVD, then let it spin in the drive. I'm not familiar with the Light-scribe inner workings but I reckon that since the laser head can only move side to side then the disc must be rotating. Centrifugal force would transform the drive into a door stop.
I guess you could stack the thin films for more capacitance?

badman 28th February 2013 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Trileru (Post 3390080)
I guess you could stack the thin films for more capacitance?

Now that easy production of the material is figured out, the rest of it will come along. Of course, the conductor is only half the battle, one still needs an insulator.

Trileru 28th February 2013 08:41 PM

I read somewhere that the Chinese are working fast pace on figuring out large scale production. Although I don't think we would see it end user available in the near future.
I wonder how much current could a 22 gauge graphene wire handle

Bigun 1st March 2013 01:39 AM

perhaps it would make a good material for transistors. Start with a single plane of graphene, low resistance would be an asset. Electrons would be sourced from one side and drain at the other side. The graphene sheet would be a control element. It will behave like a triode. The sheet is thin enough that ballistic electrons will pass through it.

maybe some nice speakers could use this stuff - those electrostatic types.

Trileru 1st March 2013 10:21 AM

IBM already had some success with transistors running at about 100GHz.

Trileru 1st March 2013 12:58 PM

IBM Details World's Fastest Graphene Transistor | PCWorld

Quote:

Instead, graphene is better suited for making analog transistors, such as signal processors and amplifiers.
Sounds awsome


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