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Old 2nd January 2012, 07:12 AM   #1
regal is offline regal  United States
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Default Radio Dog Collars and Audio

We got this radio wireless "fence" for extra containment in case our dogs get lose, doesn't really happen much but it is a nice security.

The thing that struck me was the transmitter operates at 18khz RF. Now do I have anything to worry about as far as output transformers picking up the signal (I know they love to pick up 60hz from power transformers.)
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Old 2nd January 2012, 07:18 AM   #2
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Yes.... But the 18KHz by itself would probably drive the dogs batty.
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Old 2nd January 2012, 07:25 AM   #3
Mooly is offline Mooly  United Kingdom
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Maybe a link to the product concerned

18 Khz doesn't sound right. It can be RF but that's classed as VLF and used for specific specialised use such as underwater signaling and ground penetration.

Edit 18Khz would drive me batty as well if the level were high enough.
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Old 2nd January 2012, 07:29 AM   #4
regal is offline regal  United States
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I know it is a very odd frequency right in the audio band that cought my attention:

See transmitter specs:

Buy PetSafe Wireless Fence - Discount wireless dog fences by PetSafe


The official website and owners manual doesn't spec the frequency, but I have seen this 18khz mentioned several times.
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Old 2nd January 2012, 07:42 AM   #5
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It all sounds strange to me, too.
As you say, Mooly, 18kHz is allocated for specialized and maritime uses. I wouldn't think any run-of-the-mill terrestrial product could get OK'd for that frequency.

edit: It looks like the system works by transmitting a signal to the collar. If the pet wanders outside the broadcast range, the collar emits a nuisance tone that deters further wandering.
But it does state right there in the specs...Transmitter Specs: Frequency: 18 kHz
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Last edited by sofaspud; 2nd January 2012 at 07:47 AM.
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Old 2nd January 2012, 07:51 AM   #6
Mooly is offline Mooly  United Kingdom
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I'm non the wiser really after looking at that. It doesn't tell anything about the method of operation.

The power requirements are pretty high for the transmitter PSU (1800ma was it ?). I guess 18Khz could be used as a base frequency. Wonder what the "aerial" is on the receiver. It it a coil around the collar maybe.

Dunno is the honest answer. If it is 18Khz then it's transmitted as an "RF" signal. The field strength will be very low as you move away from the thing so I guess it shouldn't be a problem in reality. It would be interesting to put a coil/transformer across a scope input and hold it near the transmitter though
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Old 2nd January 2012, 07:57 AM   #7
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18KHz would propagate just fine as RF, but with very limited range for such a transmitter. 90' is probably about right. Seriously doubtful that it would interfere with any sub comunication (typically around 8-9KHz, but hundreds of thousands of watts.) All those cheap "Atomic Clocks" that listen in on WWVB showed up after the Navy gave an old VLF transmitter to NIST which upped their signal strength a passel. Before that it took a big loop or active loopstick antenna to receive the signal in Silicon Valley from Boulder CO.

I'm more inclined to think the device Receiver emits 18KHz to let the dog know he's reached the limit of freedom. Shock collars have taken a lot of flack lately.

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Old 2nd January 2012, 08:03 AM   #8
regal is offline regal  United States
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No its a shocker, when the reciever (small black box on the collor) gets past 90ft or where you have it set it gives a few warning beeps then starts the shock. They way it works is when not receiver a signal from the transmitter it gives off a shock, it has some safeguards for power outage and what not programmed. But it there isn't an ultrasonic frequency involved, its all RF.


edit: maybe the warning beep is 18khz, and thats where the resalers are getting the number.

Last edited by regal; 2nd January 2012 at 08:07 AM.
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Old 2nd January 2012, 08:17 AM   #9
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Either way the safeguards make sense. Probably confuse the heck out of a dog to get shocked "in the zone", just because the power bumped.

But back to the initial question; yes, if the thing broadcasts 18KHz RF it will get into any electronics inside the field. Just look at how prevalent 60Hz gets in about anything. Part of that of course is it being broadcast by every wire in the house, as well as coming into a local power supply. But magnetic components of a field can be a problem too. HP shfted from a tube rectifier to diode on the later 200CD's they produced because the decrease in transformer field from not running the filament on the rectifier tube actually gave them better specs from 60Hz not getting into other active components.

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Old 2nd January 2012, 08:19 AM   #10
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Seems to me the transmitter itself does indeed operate at 18kHz. Being a low-power fixed-location unit probably gets FCC approval. I'd probably play it safe and place the transmitter as far as possible from my audio equipment. There is also the 6-foot(?) vertical broadcast area you might use to your advantage. I agree it'd be interesting to put a 'scope on a coil just to see what shows up.
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