Radio Dog Collars and Audio - Page 2 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Member Areas > The Lounge

The Lounge A place to talk about almost anything but politics and religion.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 2nd January 2012, 08:30 AM   #11
diyAudio Moderator
 
pinkmouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Chatham, England
Quote:
Originally Posted by regal View Post
edit: maybe the warning beep is 18khz, and thats where the resalers are getting the number.
That makes perfect sense to me, 18KHz is right in a dog's sensitive area, and inaudible to most humans so won't cause a nuisance to neighbours.
__________________
Rick: Oh Cliff / Sometimes it must be difficult not to feel as if / You really are a cliff / when fascists keep trying to push you over it! / Are they the lemmings / Or are you, Cliff? / Or are you Cliff?
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd January 2012, 09:02 AM   #12
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: wigan
Maybe doing a google on RF criminal tagging systems may bring some light
  Reply With Quote
Old 2nd January 2012, 10:25 PM   #13
DF96 is offline DF96  England
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
This probably using 18kHz magnetic field (i.e. near field), not true radiated RF. You need a rather large antenna to radiate any useful amount of 18kHz energy, but a simple solenoidal coil can generate a useful magnetic field. The dog presumably can't hear a magnetic field, but the receiver on his collar can pick it up and administer the appropriate stimulus.

Looks like a good way to annoy any neighbour with good high frequency hearing and decent tweeters.
  Reply With Quote
Old 3rd January 2012, 12:09 AM   #14
diyAudio Member
 
tubelab.com's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: West Virginia panhandle
The US Navy operates a VLF radio transmitter in Cutler Maine, call sign NAA. It operates with a power of up to 2 MEGAWATTS! Back in the 70's and 80's we used their signal as a back up time standard when WWVL was not available. They operated on 17.8KHz at the time, but I believe they have since changed to a different frequency. All of our equipment is now GPS referenced. The real purpose of NAA is communicating with submarines since VLF frequencies will penetrate earth and water. A dog fence with a few milliwatts of power and a small antenna is not going overpower 2 megawatts into miles of antenna.

The dog fences do transmit an electromagnetic waves, not audio. The signal is not audible, but it could be picked up by phono cartridges, guitar pickups and poorly shielded audio equipment. The transmitting antenna is usually a ferrite rod with multiple turns of wire.

There was a dog shocker on the market several years ago that used a buried wire as the "fence". When the dog approached the fence the beeping started. If the dog got closer.....ZAP! That version put a fairly large current through the wire and it did find its way into stereos, answering machines, headphones, and yes guitar amps.
__________________
Too much power is almost enough! Turn it up till it explodes - then back up just a little.
  Reply With Quote
Old 3rd January 2012, 10:01 PM   #15
diyAudio Member
 
sofaspud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: San Antonio
Can dogs, or humans, hear 18kHz RF??
Anyway, I was told by the manufacturer that the IF-100 transmitters operate on a 18.7 kHz frequency.
I'd say there is a possibility of interference, and thoughtful placement of the transmitter and audio equipment would be the easiest prevention.
__________________
It is error only, and not truth, that shrinks from enquiry. - Thomas Paine
  Reply With Quote
Old 3rd January 2012, 10:11 PM   #16
diyAudio Member
 
vinylkid58's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Victoria, B.C.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tubelab.com View Post
There was a dog shocker on the market several years ago that used a buried wire as the "fence". When the dog approached the fence the beeping started. If the dog got closer.....ZAP! That version put a fairly large current through the wire and it did find its way into stereos, answering machines, headphones, and yes guitar amps.
The neighbors had one of these electronic fences to keep their Jack Russell Terriers from escaping. The collars were supposed to keep them from barking, but didn't work very well. When they got rid of the female (the troublemaker), most of the barking and escaping stopped.

jeff
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th August 2012, 12:21 PM   #17
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
There are some major problems with the radio tracking collars which make GPS dog collars a very attractable alternative. There is no question that the cost of such systems is very high. These devices are very new to the arena of pet owners and so this has kept the price very high for the time being.




dog accessories for small dogs
luxury pet products online
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
wilson audio :watch dog subwoofer drivers muddasirwaheedmalik Subwoofers 45 15th November 2011 03:48 PM
ADC for USB streaming AM radio audio elctrolaw Analogue Source 0 23rd April 2011 03:39 AM
Audio [Radio] Amplifier Ideas Needed audiohobby Solid State 0 27th February 2009 01:21 PM
Both hum and radio interference in an audio circuit mnw21 Solid State 2 5th July 2003 09:08 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 11:17 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2