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Old 17th May 2013, 12:48 AM   #1861
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OK Scott, I know I don't have your knowledge. All I know is this stuff was a semi-soft cheese, not out front in the cooler with the others, and not as expensive as some of the boutique cheese. This smelled like, how do you say...Cheese ****. Limburger is not in the same category, maybe little brother at best. It's a long ways from where I live but maybe a trip is in order.
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Old 17th May 2013, 01:11 AM   #1862
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Originally Posted by Cal Weldon View Post
OK Scott, I know I don't have your knowledge. All I know is this stuff was a semi-soft cheese, not out front in the cooler with the others, and not as expensive as some of the boutique cheese. This smelled like, how do you say...Cheese ****. Limburger is not in the same category, maybe little brother at best. It's a long ways from where I live but maybe a trip is in order.
Just pointing out the general tolerance in other cultures of strong smells and tastes. There are plenty of things I won't touch but I don't even find durian stinky.

There's a grated root in Asian cooking that has no taste or smell to speak of but is like a big mouthful of phlegm, I literally gag on it.
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Old 17th May 2013, 01:37 AM   #1863
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comeon Scott you really think that the travel time of the length to get to Au means something significant in the face of what is it a 2-2.5+ years old, cured piece of meat? that would seem against the point of preserving it. Surely that was part of the reason to do it in the first place? travel took a hell of a lot longer in days past vs the type of transport you get when paying this sort of money for a foodstuff.

but yes, chances are I havent yet had the best of the best Iberico, or the best of the best prosciutto... it and Serrano have only very recently started to be imported and I havent made a point of specifically searching out the meat worth several hundred a kg and I dont work in the industry anymore. the Serrano is fairly easily available at a few good delis, the iberico i've only had eating out. the Parma was the first to be brought in legally, as we have a much larger Italian population I guess.


....
rest:
also actually apart from my restatement for jacco, it was you guys that made it about the best of the best iberico vs dross prosciutto. my initial comparson was between Parma and Serrano, both in the 35-70AUD per kg range (roughly on parity to US Currency to those who dont know)

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Another possibility is that we don't regard Australians as connoisseurs so we may have sent some junk there.
Funny... somehow I think we have some pretty decent bargaining power in the food import/export stakes these days ... a few examples of many, Wagu, as well as black truffles and saffron of pretty good quality and good clean Tasmanian environment, 6 months offset from your northern hemisphere seasons... as well as things more exotic to you. Chances are you would have initially been denying your own ex-patriots, but only you know if you would do that I dont know.

Last edited by qusp; 17th May 2013 at 01:44 AM.
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Old 17th May 2013, 01:51 AM   #1864
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Originally Posted by scott wurcer View Post
Just pointing out the general tolerance in other cultures of strong smells and tastes. There are plenty of things I won't touch but I don't even find durian stinky.

There's a grated root in Asian cooking that has no taste or smell to speak of but is like a big mouthful of phlegm, I literally gag on it.
Taro root? if so, i'm in full agreement. basically tasteless starchy sticky.. well yes... mucous subsistence food for the poor.

I cant stand Durian, but i'll eat stinkier things.
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Old 17th May 2013, 01:55 AM   #1865
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Originally Posted by scott wurcer View Post
Just pointing out the general tolerance in other cultures of strong smells and tastes.
That's true, but from one foodie to another, that isn't in the cards for this group or so I hope. I love Durian. We freeze the pods then stick 'em with a fork to have an ice cold treat like ice cream/custard. Love on a stick... Uh, maybe I should rephrase that.
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Old 17th May 2013, 02:07 AM   #1866
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its aroma is too overpowering, kinda musty OTT sweet for me fresh, I dont mind the dried stuff.

love on a stick... lol

maybe its the fact the smell is usually mixed with smells of dried fish

Last edited by qusp; 17th May 2013 at 02:09 AM.
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Old 17th May 2013, 12:19 PM   #1867
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Originally Posted by Cal Weldon View Post
I know we are the same page but just to confirm, this is the pepper of which you speak?.
Bigger, wrinklier and orange are the ones I am talking about. You can see them further down on the wikipedia page. You cut into them and your eyes water - and if you throw them into hot chili or soup they make you choke...
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Old 17th May 2013, 12:33 PM   #1868
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Mmmmm, Madrid. That was the first place I ever experienced padron peppers. One of the most simple and fabulous bar dishes in the world.

We grew some ourselves while we were in Texas- the ratio of sweet to hot was reversed from the Spanish ones...
@Cassiel, happy birthday! I'll celebrate it with some hash


@qusp, you are right, bad jamon can be awful as well as bad prosciutto can be, I have never tried a good one. On my todo list

It's easy to spot the difference, and flavour is like two different products nothing to do with each other. Even without trying them out, you can easily tell which is the good one. Attached pics.


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Originally Posted by jacco vermeulen View Post
(fwiw, in Europe, the genuine gourmands are the Spanish 1st, Belgiums 2nd, not the French or Italians)
Not because of living here, but I have been in England, France, Italy, Netherlands, Czech republic, Austria, etc... and I have to strongly agree with that. Variety and quality of spanish dishes is surprisingly, I still have a lot of plates to try after so many years!
General consensus among people here regarding the USA is that they ONLY eat hamburguers, pizzas and hot dogs. Of course they have never traveled there and just repeat what other people or T.V. say.

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Originally Posted by scott wurcer View Post
I think it was the Madrid Open where the hole-in-one prize was your weight in local ham.
There are no local ham as regarding to Madrid. Is like wine, it's a product that is not widely produced in the region. They mey were referring to local as Spain

From what I have heard, ham sent abroad is mostly junk unless you are willing to pay ridiculous amount of money.
Just to make it clear, Serrano it just means the kind of ham. Then you have the race of the pig, which can be "white" (cheap) pig or Iberico. Then the pig can be fed with only compound feed, acorn, or a mixture of both. Of course Jamon Serrano Ibérico fed with acorn is the top of the line.

Then you have brands like "Pata negra", "5J" or "Jabugo" which doesn't really mean anything, just brands thay may make some confussion on the consumer.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg bueno.jpg (21.3 KB, 55 views)
File Type: jpg malo.jpg (77.8 KB, 55 views)
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Last edited by regiregi22; 17th May 2013 at 12:36 PM.
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Old 17th May 2013, 01:12 PM   #1869
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I know we are the same page but just to confirm, this is the pepper of which you speak? I always thought the red ones were called Scotch Bonnets but these were labeled as Red Habanero. This the last of them, that's why they are so small.
They are called Scotch Bonnets on english-speaking islands in the caribbean and Habanero in spanish-speaking places.
They come in green, yellow, orange and red but colour doesn't seem to make any difference in hotness.
I like them and buy them regularly but singly ie two or three at a time. The jamaicans around here buy them by the pound!

General rule of thumb with chilis: The shorter the hotter.
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Old 17th May 2013, 01:21 PM   #1870
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The shorter the hotter.
Many men say that to girls.
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