Typical guitar output? - Page 2 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Live Sound > Instruments and Amps

Instruments and Amps Everything that makes music, Especially including instrument amps.

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 8th June 2006, 09:29 AM   #11
diyAudio Moderator
 
pinkmouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Chatham, England
Post a pic.
__________________
Rick: Oh Cliff / Sometimes it must be difficult not to feel as if / You really are a cliff / when fascists keep trying to push you over it! / Are they the lemmings / Or are you, Cliff? / Or are you Cliff?
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th June 2006, 09:30 AM   #12
sreten is offline sreten  United Kingdom
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brighton UK
Hi,

as far as I'm aware the nominal output of an electric guitar
and the nominal input sensitivity of guitar amplifiers is 10mV.

Though for amplifiers 5mV and 20mV is also common.

/sreten.
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th June 2006, 09:38 AM   #13
Wynand is offline Wynand  South Africa
diyAudio Member
 
Wynand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Cape Town
I'm unfortunately at work now

I'll try to get one for tomorrow.

I'll do a search on the internet for humbuckers also.

10mV sounds more like I would have expected...We'll see.
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th June 2006, 09:51 AM   #14
diyAudio Member
 
runebivrin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Huddinge, Sweden
Send a message via MSN to runebivrin
Quote:
Originally posted by Wynand
I'm not sure what pickups i've got on my guitar?!?

Do you know the output of other types of pickups?

How do I see if it's a humbucker?
Most of the time you can judge that by the width of the pickup. Single coils are rarely wider than 20mm / 1". Humbuckers are usually twice as wide, since they contain two coils side-by-side.

Another way to tell is through the position of the magnetic poles. If they're centered in the pickup case it's a single coil. If there's two rows of poles or a single row way off-center, it's a humbucker.

And guitar pre-amps need headroom. A lot of it, unless you want distortion. The initial "pluck" transient can be quite insane.

Rune
__________________
Do wizards use spell checkers?
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th June 2006, 10:02 AM   #15
Wynand is offline Wynand  South Africa
diyAudio Member
 
Wynand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Cape Town
I've got two pickups. Both look the same.

Black plastic cover. 4cm x 8cm . 1 row of screws in the centre of each.


P.S. I just saw the first sonar of my first-born-to-be.

  Reply With Quote
Old 8th June 2006, 10:32 AM   #16
teemuk is offline teemuk  Finland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Suomi, Finland
Default Re: Typical guitar output?

Quote:
Originally posted by Wynand
Would anyboy be able to tell me what the typical output is from a guitar.

I want to make a guitar preamp with op-amps but I don't know what gain to use.
What is the input sensitivity of your power amplifier? You have to reach this figure at the output of the preamp with volume at ten. Later on you will attenuate the amplitude dramatically with a volume potentiometer. A good design value is to assume that the guitar signal is 50mVpp. However, this is only a mean value and the signal will occasionally exceed it: Some pickups may put out peak amplitudes exceeding one volt. Bearing this in mind, you should use low gain (less than 7) to retain headroom. You only need as much gain as attenuated by the passive stages (tone controls etc.) and what's left to catch up with the input sensitivity.
  Reply With Quote
Old 8th June 2006, 11:49 AM   #17
diyAudio Member
 
runebivrin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Huddinge, Sweden
Send a message via MSN to runebivrin
Default Re: Re: Typical guitar output?

Quote:
Originally posted by Wynand
I've got two pickups. Both look the same.

Black plastic cover. 4cm x 8cm . 1 row of screws in the centre of each.


P.S. I just saw the first sonar of my first-born-to-be.

That sounds like a P-90 type single coil pickup.

Quote:
Originally posted by teemuk


What is the input sensitivity of your power amplifier? You have to reach this figure at the output of the preamp with volume at ten. Later on you will attenuate the amplitude dramatically with a volume potentiometer. A good design value is to assume that the guitar signal is 50mVpp. However, this is only a mean value and the signal will occasionally exceed it: Some pickups may put out peak amplitudes exceeding one volt. Bearing this in mind, you should use low gain (less than 7) to retain headroom. You only need as much gain as attenuated by the passive stages (tone controls etc.) and what's left to catch up with the input sensitivity.
I'd say this is one of those rare cases where you'd actually want a potentiometer to set the gain, or at least make it switchable. A range from 1 to 20 is probably all that's useful, unless you want heavy distortion, in which case the sky's the limit for the heavy metal freaks.

A lot of guitar amps have two inputs with different sensitivity to cover the single coil/humbucker issue.

Rune
__________________
Do wizards use spell checkers?
  Reply With Quote
Old 9th June 2006, 11:53 AM   #18
Optical is offline Optical  New Zealand
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
My reasonably high output Seymour Duncan pickups put out a 200mV signal peak.
Picking a high pitched note is more like 10mV

the voltage decays very quickly though
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th June 2006, 04:48 PM   #19
DoctorJ is offline DoctorJ  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Georgia
Dimarzio has their pickups rated as high, medium and vintage output. The X2N output is 510mV.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th June 2006, 04:07 PM   #20
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Cool Peak Output can be much higher !

If we take the first peak of the guitar signal into consideration, the signal can be much higher than 100 - 400 mV. If you play a chord with a strong attack, the intitial transient signal peak can be up to 1,5 volts - than the level drops down to 100 - 200 mV. Of course - this is only a short peak lasting a few milliseconds, but this peak is, what makes much of the sound. If you have only a headroom of - let us say 0,5 V in the input stage of your amp, you will not hear any distortion, but you will hear, that the sound is affected.
The way, the peak is handled by the amp is one of the main reasons, why tupe-amps sound different than most solid-state circuits. Tubes have a different way to handle transient peaks. FETs are similar - some OP-amps will also do fine. The effect of peak modulation is intensively used in dynamic compressors - in particular in opto-compressors and tube compressors.

As a rule, you should have enough headroom to accomodate at least 1 V - better is 1,5 volts if you are using strong output PUs, if you want the whole peak, dynamic and sparkle in the sound.

If you are using an OP-Amp input-stage in your guitar amp with typically +/- 15V supply, you should not exceed an amplification factor of maximum 15 - better is 10.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ground loops & whine on my guitar's output signal! HankMcSpank Solid State 1 13th August 2008 08:47 PM
Connecting headphones to guitar amp speaker output mike6182 Instruments and Amps 6 21st November 2007 10:20 AM
Typical 2A3 hum? bobhayes Tubes / Valves 31 17th October 2005 01:12 PM
Just your typical DIY enclosure.. ScottG Multi-Way 2 10th July 2005 10:44 PM
cheapest output transformer for a SE EL84 guitar tschrama Tubes / Valves 12 23rd December 2003 10:15 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 01:49 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2