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Old 20th January 2005, 02:59 PM   #1
troystg is offline troystg  United States
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Default 60 Hz band reject filter

Hi All-

I did a search and got zip.. So here goes.

Has anyone ever tried a band reject filter to deal with 60 Hz hum from single coil guitar pickups?

I am NOT a musician, but I rewired my neighbor’s guitar and made it dead quiet. So quiet that it picks up the ticks of his watches second hand on his left wrist.

He loved the silence of the guitar but I was still appalled at the hum it picks up.

I will be trying the out steel shielding cups behind the pickups, but I curious to see if anyone had ever tried an electrical solution.

Any inputs welcome!
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Old 20th January 2005, 10:06 PM   #2
Optical is offline Optical  New Zealand
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perhaps have a look at this circuit?
http://members.shaw.ca/roma/nine.html
not sure if its what you are looking for..

what did you do to the guitar to make it 'dead quiet'?
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Old 20th January 2005, 11:39 PM   #3
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Texas Instruments has a 60Hz notch filter right on their website -- in the opamp applications area.
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Old 21st January 2005, 01:33 AM   #4
troystg is offline troystg  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by Optical


what did you do to the guitar to make it 'dead quiet'?

First of all I twisted the pick-up coil leads... Instead of them separated and laying all over inside. I think that was most likely the biggest single improvement.

But then I screened the twisted pairs from all three pick-ups (Strat) and grounded to the pick-up switch. Then I used shielded twisted pair wire to connect the switch to the pots and from the pots out to the jack. ALL wire was Silver plated Copper with Teflon insulation. I use it on other projects and had it handy.

Worked well. Picture attached. Before then after.




As for the 60 Hz band reject, I was thinking more on the lines of passive components and making a tank circuit.... I just don't know if it is practical at such a low frequency... The components may have to be too large due to the frequency extreme even though the signal level is miniscule.
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Old 21st January 2005, 01:34 AM   #5
troystg is offline troystg  United States
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After. Not perfect but really helped out.
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Old 21st January 2005, 04:50 AM   #6
Nasse is offline Nasse  Finland
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I think 120Hz (100 Hz in europe) harmonic (and maybe others further up) is what you really hear mostly with some guitar speakers

I think I have seen old article suggesting putting 50 Hz and 100 Hz filters in series
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Old 21st January 2005, 07:00 AM   #7
Enzo is offline Enzo  United States
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SIngle coils pick up environmental hum. That is why humbuckers were invented. But humbuckers sound different. As far as I know, there are no silent single coils.

You start hanging filters and circuits all over the guitar input, and you pretty quickly lose its tone.

Might as well use active pickups. Check them out.

You might go over to Seymour DUncan's website for pickup info.

There is a pickup winders forum over at www.ampage.org, but I fon't frequent that room there. All the other forums there are very knowledgable, so I expect this one to be.
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Old 21st January 2005, 03:50 PM   #8
troystg is offline troystg  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by Enzo

You start hanging filters and circuits all over the guitar input, and you pretty quickly lose its tone.


Hi-

This is going to turn into a project with LOTS of testing!.. Long late hours of drinking beer and listening to my buddy play his guitar to ensure my mods don't infrenge on his tone...

Rough job but somebody has to do it...

I'll start by checking if the offending hum is the second harmonic or the primary 60 cycle pwr.

Then I will calculate some values for the appropriate filter.

Around then it should be time for a beer.

I'll let you know how far I get.... :-)
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Old 21st January 2005, 03:58 PM   #9
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Another solution to picking up hum is the use of a compensation coil like the one that Alembic uses on their basses. In this case one can still use single-coil pickups. But that approach would require quite some effort.

Regards

Charles
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Old 22nd January 2005, 04:19 AM   #10
BbbyBld is offline BbbyBld  United States
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As a guitar player, I would be wary about that kind of filtering! Maybe the easiest thing would be to get a noise gate.
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