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Old 26th June 2012, 04:15 PM   #91
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Talking Useful URL

Below is a useful URL for finding the frequencies of notes, bass-guitar, guitar, etc. Note Frequencies


Now, if someone had posted this early on in this thread, would we have had so much (pedantic, in my case) fun?






John



PS ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ





(Paraphrased?) "Swim around in limited mid-range frequencies"?? Do they ever get mad because your bass is masking their leads or rhythms? Do you know Jack Bruce? chuckle All rhetorical questions needing no answer.

Last edited by JohnEEADBL; 26th June 2012 at 04:20 PM. Reason: chuckle/clarification
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Old 26th June 2012, 06:16 PM   #92
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Learning all sorts of things here- didn't have a clue about bass. I worked on an old Carvin bass amp (Pro Bass 300) that had a non-defeatable "mudcutter" circuit. This was nothing more than a simple notch filter network that dropped out the area around 250 Hz by 10 dB. It had a very broad effect, being a low order network. The modern Carvin amps have something similar in the form of a Contour control, that notches out 350 Hz by varying degrees, and shifts higher as the depth is increased. Would this be a commonly used control, and what do you think about the old amp that had no way to defeat it?
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Old 26th June 2012, 06:59 PM   #93
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Bass tone is very subjective. Some years ago I started looking for the tone I wanted. Went through quite a few bass guitars, modified a couple of amps and assembled some speakers. Other bass players probably wouldn't have made the same choices I did, especially those with that excessive treble boink boink tone. A filter such as the Carvin has could work for some bass players, but not me. It would be gone as soon as my soldering iron heats up.
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Old 27th June 2012, 12:03 PM   #94
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Also GK and SWR have these notch thingies. On some it is switchable on some it can be varied and on some it is fixed. With one of my basses it doesn't sound too bad. With others - specially fretless - it sounds awful.

I like amps that are quite neutral and I use tone controls only slightly. The tone must come from the imstrument and the player IMO.

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Charles
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Old 4th July 2012, 01:32 AM   #95
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For rock music, 4kHz is usually the top frequency the bass puts out, it's quite common to filter out everything above that on the desk to avoid some hiss in the mix. Most instrument amplifiers don't have a dedicated tweeter. For certain dub or reggae bass sounds, one can lose everything above 800Hz.

Your classic slap bass player, however, will have a compression driver in his cabinet producing everything past 20kHz at higher than normal sensitivity.
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Old 4th July 2012, 01:35 AM   #96
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Originally Posted by Conrad Hoffman View Post
"mudcutter" circuit. This was nothing more than a simple notch filter network that dropped out the area around 250 Hz by 10 dB.
What a terrible idea! the most important components of a good bass sound live around there. The 2nd and 3rd harmonics of the bottom strings, and all of the open thinner strings.

Last edited by bishopdante; 4th July 2012 at 01:38 AM.
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Old 4th July 2012, 07:17 AM   #97
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I think one of the advantages having a tweeter is to know at least to some degree what is going out via the DI of the amp. Without tweeter you may put out a lot of string handling noise through the DI while not even noticing it on stage.
IMO it is preferable to restrict the bandwidth on the amp (tone control) or the instrument if needed.
One nice element for tone control can be a lowpass filter whose pole frequency and Q can be tuned. Alembic basses have something like that on board.

Regards

Charles
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Old 5th July 2012, 05:05 PM   #98
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Originally Posted by phase_accurate View Post
I think one of the advantages having a tweeter is to know at least to some degree what is going out via the DI of the amp. Without tweeter you may put out a lot of string handling noise through the DI while not even noticing it on stage.

IMO it is preferable to restrict the bandwidth on the amp (tone control) or the instrument if needed.

One nice element for tone control can be a lowpass filter whose pole frequency and Q can be tuned. Alembic basses have something like that on board. ...
The Pros do all of that and other tricks as well. Some play through mic'd/mixed/tweaked amps, others rely on simple, built-in passive "tone" controls ... and a few play through complex pre-amps with all kinds of effects that may even trigger synthesizers, midi devices, etc.

The Alembic Basses generally are equipped with adjustable active pre-amps that can roll off the higher frequencies and boost or cut the mid-range, boost or cut the low frequencies ... passing the gas through healthy bass amps that may or may not roll off above 5k, more or less ... to taste with lots of practice and experimentation. (There is an active Alembic blog for a better answer.)

IMHO: building a decent DIY bass amp and speaker set, one would not be remiss in copying the Fender Bassman (tube) or a mainstream solid state guitar amp and letting a pre-amp do the tweaking and any effects. The addition of tweeters can be done as needed or desired (IMHO middies are more important) ... there is usually plenty of room inside a bass cabinet for crossovers, etc.

Permanently building a bass power amp with non-adjustable roll-off might limit future possibilities for the musician ... I would build for a flat response from 5 htz through at least 8k htz. and have a pre-amp do the tweaking and include the possibility of adding middies and tweeters and electronics ...

(Disclosure: I don't play, but my brother has been on stage for 40 years and his son is now the World's #1 DJ = they know these answers, I am just repeating what they have told me over the years. Best to consult a few Pros before you build.)

Last edited by FastEddy; 5th July 2012 at 05:17 PM.
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Old 5th July 2012, 05:41 PM   #99
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Permanently building a bass power amp with non-adjustable roll-off might limit future possibilities for the musician ... I would build for a flat response from 5 htz through at least 8k htz. and have a pre-amp do the tweaking and include the possibility of adding middies and tweeters and electronics ...
Maybe I was a little unspecific. But this is what I wanted to say.

Regards

Charles
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Old 5th July 2012, 07:06 PM   #100
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Originally Posted by FastEddy View Post
The Alembic Basses generally are equipped with adjustable active pre-amps that can roll off the higher frequencies and boost or cut the mid-range, boost or cut the low frequencies
As someone whom has owned 3 Alembic basses, two Series 1, you are incorrect in your description of how the tone control on an Alembic works. I've also built clones of this circuit to put in other instruments. PA is correct in his description.
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