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Old 2nd November 2012, 12:56 AM   #41
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I see what you mean just 2 valves on the schematic labeled v6,v7,v8 and v9,v10,v11 that's real helpful ..... not. you'll just hav to trace em by hand.
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Old 2nd November 2012, 02:04 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclecamper View Post
I'll say one thing, this head is enormous. It looks kind of like a bandmaster that grew up on steroids. The chassis is already long, then I had it made taller and deeper too.
On the Studio Bass version at least, the chassis is kind of flimsy for the size and weight. The one I worked on was a head conversion that wasn't done quite as well as it could've been, and in shipping it got fairly deformed.
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Old 2nd November 2012, 07:27 PM   #43
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Yes, my chassis was deformed at the faceplate and at the rear flange. Several broken knobs also indicate that it fell on its face more than once, probably because it was top-heavy and front-heavy and the snap-in wheels all caster so the wheel mounts can be rotated inward which makes it have a narrow track and even more likely to fall over. Strange that it even has this rear flange sticking out the back, and it's drilled too. And the spot weld in one corner is broken too. I'd re-weld it but I'm reluctant to run such high-currents thru the chassis without stripping everything out of it first. And the entire chassis is twisted a little bit too. At least it's really easy to straighten without beating the heck out of it. As a combo, it really should have been built with the power amp on the bottom and just the preamp w/ knobs on top.

I added a top plate of thick aluminum to close the open side of the chassis, and made the head cabinet a bit larger to accomodate its additional thickness. I did this on my other amps too, adn bolted it on. On this one, I was contemplting other options so that I didn't have to unbolt it to service it. For instance, I could attach the the cover to the cabinet instead; it would still shield and be grounded fine when the original long screws thru those two chrome metal straps on top of the amp are tightened. If I bolt the plate to the chassis instead it will be more bother to open, but might reinforce the chassis better.

Most Fender amp chassis are held in by long flat-head machine screws thru the metal straps visible on top of the head. Usually the bolts go all the way thru the entire chassis and into exposed nuts on the other side, the bottom of the chassis. On this amp the bolts are shorter and go into captured nuts, each held in a spring-clip attached to a flange on each end of the chassis that bends in at the TOP of the chassis. So the bolts don't run all the way thru the chassis like normal. And the bolts are larger diameter than usual. This probably also doesn't support the chassis as well, and could make it bend.

I added wooden support rails to the sides of the cabinet, so that the whole chassis slides in & out like a drawer.

Last edited by cyclecamper; 2nd November 2012 at 07:49 PM.
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Old 12th November 2012, 07:05 AM   #44
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I'm starting to glue on the new tolex. Wish me luck. Fender always uses 4 pieces on their slant-faceplate heads. That allows them to avoid butt-joints in the tolex around the faceplate and they use overlap seams on the top and bottom. Overlap seams actually last longer and wear better. But I'll probably do small mitre butt seams around the faceplate and wrap the whole thing in one piece. Won't look as authentic as Fender-style but this crossed the line to 'mutt' long ago.
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Old 12th November 2012, 07:18 AM   #45
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Default pics?

get sum one to take sum pics of the tolex process mine's just arrived and to be honest I hav only the vaguest idea of how to put it on. lol not having worked with tolex before. all previous cabs done with black carpet which hides a lota sins.
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Old 12th November 2012, 08:36 AM   #46
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Yeah Post some pics man we wanna see it lol
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Old 12th November 2012, 08:55 AM   #47
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There's some great demos on u-tube, but the heads shown don't have the fender slant-panel faceplate. There's all kinds of recommendations on whether to use contact cement or spray glue (which is also a type of contact cement). The recommendations from people who have used multiple types seem to tie between spray adhesive and those that are water-based. The water-based are definitely nicer to use indoors with closed windows in chilly weather. Less smell. Work as well. Easier clean-up. Spray can get expensive. I got Rocket Cab Tolex Glue. "water based tolex and tweed adhesive" in a 1-quart can. 3 wide disposable bristle brushes. I wish I had also bought a few narrow ones, darn it I didn't. I guess I'll put down some paper to work on. Somebody online recommended I keep a bucket of water and an old wet towel handy if using water-based, or some mineral spirits and paper towels if I use ordinary contact adhesive or spray. Here in California I could probably easily find some kind of water-based contact cement at Lowe's or Home Depot.
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Old 12th November 2012, 08:59 AM   #48
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always wanted to see the tolex process gotta be pretty cool/neat lol but I admit the old shag carpet on heads I think looks cool just has that unmistakable 80s look rofl
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Old 12th November 2012, 09:19 AM   #49
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Some experienced post online said that the real contact cements or spray that are not water-based, tend to make the tolex stretch, which sounds like it could help in fitting corners, but it never gets that stretchy and he implied it somehow tended to make more trapped bubbles and also made the tolex try to shrink. That sounds like a real problem with contact cement, that it makes the tolex stretch during applicaiton but shrink later; we want to trim it to fit perfectly, or a bit tight, but we sure don't want it shrinking back from the joints. In fact I might look for the vinyl sheet flooring invisible-seam sealer, which should be able to weld the butt-seams. I'm most concerned about the visible seams at the top corners and less about the seams at the face-plate bend below that. The bottom and back corners will be hidden by chrome corner covers. So that is what drew me to the water-based plus having it not smell or hurt your eyes etc. is a bonus.

Last edited by cyclecamper; 12th November 2012 at 09:21 AM.
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Old 12th November 2012, 09:31 AM   #50
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This is not the 1960's blonde nublex known as 'rough blonde' but this is the real fender part number earlier tolex with a sort of fabric-like pattern. I'm not sure I like it, I originally would have preferred a smooth blonde over either the early fabric-like pattern or the rough stuff. But I really like the color. Pretty light but not tan or brown and definitely not arctic white or off-white.

And I found a handle with a very close color-match which looks great, and sure is easier than trying to cover a handle-strap with tolex. I would like to make some aluminum bases for under the handle ends. I got some stainless bolts and t-nuts.

I would like to make some aluminum strip plates for on the top of the amp to use instead of the stock Fender chromed steel ones. The Fender ones rust eventually.
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