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Old 8th March 2011, 04:59 AM   #1
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Question Head vs. Head

Hello to all people out there. I am in a dilemma, for what amp to get.
I am currently growing out of combo practice amps, and looking into getting a stack. I am torn between the Line 6 IV hd150, and a Peavy VYPYR. I am planning on building a cab myself, so I have options for wiring.

Is the more watts going to speakers mean that it is louder??
How big of a stack can a line 6 hold?
Can I use a full stack with the Peavy??

Some background of what i plan to do.
I plan on using some drop tuning, and want built in effects, footwsitch jack, and maybe an effects loop. Any other suggestions welcome, And the lower the price, the better, as I am saving up some money from some small gigs.

Thanks
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Old 8th March 2011, 06:46 AM   #2
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Thread moved to more appropriate area.
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Old 8th March 2011, 12:52 PM   #3
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I would imagine it really depends on a LOT of factors?.

Your amp/speakers is really only for on-stage monitoring, or small venues. The main volume from your guitar should be through the PA system.

Your musical style affects it as well, stacks are mostly for heavy metal, and more for 'showing off' than anything else
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Old 8th March 2011, 08:13 PM   #4
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While in the absolute more watts will make something louder, in the general case, practically a lighter cone speaker, or a different cabinet, will often make more difference than doubling amp power. Even rigging that combo on a chair so that it's feeding your ears rather than your knees can make an enormous difference, far more than just more power.

So, why do you need this extra loud? Personal gratification? Need for feedback to the instrument to increase sustain? Other members of the band can't hear you? (that last one's dangerous, as it tends to lead to an upward spiral) Admittedly a stack tends to spread better than a combo (memories of an outdoor festival where a mesa Boogie 1x12 was blasting a laser-straight line of annihilation through the audience, with those two places off the beam not understanding why their neighbours' ears had started to bleed) but it's a lot more transport.
So a large array of inefficient loudspeakers looks impressive, doesn't get too loud, and covers reasonably well.

But if you use a tower with six 250 watt 12" speakers, you're not obliged to drive it with a thousand watt amp. In fact, that much potential power would make you very difficult to work with. In fact, do you like the sound of your present combo? (apart from there not being enough of it, that is? ) If you know it well, and can get what you need out of it, it might be worth simply taking the speaker output and feeding a solid state booster, cheap PA amp with good specs and no expensive controls.

Then, when you gid small gigs, or big gigs with decent PA and monitors, you could leave the heavy stuff behind.

The original Marshall 8x12 contained 8 fifteen watt celestion 12 inchers, was run of a fifty watt amp, and was designed when PAs were a joke.
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Old 8th March 2011, 09:20 PM   #5
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Just came back to answer your question properly after the move this morning, and I see Chris has raised every single point I was going to. Thanks Chris!
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Old 9th March 2011, 03:24 AM   #6
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I am upgrading the driver in my small combo. It works fairly well, but if i stand 50 ft away from it, and play a chord, i can barely hear it. This is not usefull if i am going to play outdoors, which is what i plan on doing somewhat.

I am playing metal, or at least hard rock type music.
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Old 9th March 2011, 08:05 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stolenband View Post
I am upgrading the driver in my small combo. It works fairly well, but if i stand 50 ft away from it, and play a chord, i can barely hear it. This is not usefull if i am going to play outdoors, which is what i plan on doing somewhat.

I am playing metal, or at least hard rock type music.
Like I said above, the power should come from the PA, not from your guitar amp - I doubt upgrading the driver will make much, if any, difference.
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Old 9th March 2011, 09:38 AM   #8
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There is no absolute rule that says all the work must be done by the PA.

Certainly there is a fashion for in-ear monitoring, keep levels down on stage, when the automatic decibel shutdown comes in you can't hear anything but the drums type concert, but it makes the musicians very dependent on technicians who are not part of the band, and they have no reason to trust to be getting it right. (Yeah, I'm often one of those technicians, and why should you trust my judgement on the final mix?) And feeling the performance in your bogy, with twenty thousand watts of sidefills, drum fill and wedges driving back into the musicians is a very physical, adrenaline-loaded experience (even if your FOH mixer has given a sigh, and is trying just to get vocals and snare drum audible through the mess).

But he obviously doesn't need this stimulus to play, as he's succeeding quite well now on a combo.

Trouble is, an AC30 can easily balance up with a 200 watt bass rig, and amplified drums. A keyboard rig would need at least 250 watts and efficient speakers to match it without distortion. Are you intending to upgrade all your back line, and your transport? If it is just occasional big gigs, much easier to hire an outdoor PA when, and only when you need it. And if you're playing festivals or opening band even that is generally covered.

As regards which amp would be best for you, the only way is to try it, if possible in the real conditions you'd be using it . Listening to it in a shop isn't the same. Hire one for a gig, get the music shop to bring one round, find a mate with one. "Sound" in this situation is subjective; we can talk about dBs, and build quality, toughness; but it's not percentage distortion or phase shift that's going to make this your amp, and you are the only person who can feel your needs.
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Old 9th March 2011, 11:41 PM   #9
Enzo is offline Enzo  United States
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If I can't trust you with my mix, why on earth would I hire you?

There is no law about getting the giotar in the PA, but come on, outdoors? Outdoors is the toughest room there is to fill with sound. Some guitar amps beam the sound straight out the front. That means you can hear it a mile away as long as you are on axis with the speaker. But then the rest of the guys on stage can;t hear you. Other speakers/cabs spread the sound around, great for on stage, everyone can hear. But then it doesn;t project very far.

Neither of those things fills the outdoors though. Your beamer falls on the ears of those few folks right in the path of your amp, but no one else hears you. Of your cab has a difuse pattern and the only folks to hear you are the ffront row. SO outdoors especially, you ought to be in the PA.
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Old 10th March 2011, 01:00 AM   #10
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Mostly, i just want to upgrade to something that does not make me look like a kid who just picked a wall mart guitar. I want to make it look like i am not a beginner.
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