Piezo Transducer Trigger 4A Analog Simmons Drum Module - diyAudio
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Old 29th October 2007, 04:37 PM   #1
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Default Piezo Transducer Trigger 4A Analog Simmons Drum Module

I have an older Simmons SDS8 drum module, it is analog with 1/4" jacks and 5 separate drum sounds.

I was hoping to find a good post on using Piezo transducer mics or pressure sensitive triggers for a home-made project, so I could simply hook the mics onto a percussion setup. Ideally the mics would be split so they can act both as mics for the percussion instruments (congas bongos, etc.), and as triggers for plugging into the Simmons Module, but if I could only use them as triggers for the module that would be ok.

COST is the main factor. I have heard Radio Shack has cheap piezo discs but I was hoping someone on this forum would know more about it?

Thanks in advance. I am hoping to make good use of this forum. I searched elsewhere for this topic but didn't find anything less than 2 years old..
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Old 30th October 2007, 04:28 AM   #2
fdeck is offline fdeck  United States
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People have been using piezo buzzer discs from Radio Shack, for DIY instrument transducers. I suspect the principle is the same for the drum triggers. Buy a piezo buzzer, preferably with 2 wires (there is sometimes a 3rd wire for use in a self oscillating circuit). Crack open the plastic case and extract the element. Hook it up to a signal cable. Attach to drum. Bang away. Improve your results by working on how the trigger attaches to the drum.

There shouldn't be much more to it than that.
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Old 30th October 2007, 08:39 AM   #3
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Thank you fdeck, very much, any and all input totally welcome.. Signal cable meaning a standard instrument cable, right? Are the wires on these "buzzers" marked + and - ??

I think a trip to the local Radio Shack will be in short order...
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Old 2nd November 2007, 02:25 AM   #4
fdeck is offline fdeck  United States
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Standard cable. The wires are typically marked, but it is also obvious the polarity once you get a unit cracked open. To solder directly to the element, you need some solder with silver in it, such as perhaps the lead-free stuff.
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Old 2nd November 2007, 04:17 AM   #5
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When I was a repair tech, we used small speakers instead of the expensive and fragile Simmons triggers. Worked a treat. Just get the very cheapest 3" or 4" speaker you can fit under the pad, solder the cable, and Bob's yer uncle.
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Old 9th November 2007, 03:58 PM   #6
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piezo triggers, buzzers, tweeters etc. are all really just the same thing. Some piezo crystal bonded to a plate and polarization determined by which side the piezo is on.
Piezo crystal is in fact not polarized which is why it works.

Anyway, they will have certain frequency and voltage ratings that varies from trigger to trigger just as it does tweeter to tweeter.

My experience is this.
Larger piezo tweeters don't typically sound as good as the smaller ones but, they have more output and bandwidth. The smaller ones are usually better sounding and more sensitive.
Which will perform better however determines the project.

Right now I have a high end Casio table top electronic drum set and wouldn't you know it, the stupid thing can't keep up with any high rate of drumming, it's borderline useless. I contacted Casio and they of course quoted a repair cost 3 times what I paid for the thing.
Last option?
Track down some affordable triggers or tweeters, replace the factory ones and see if they were just so battered that they weren't doing their job properly.

My thinking is it's just the systems brain limitations, I couldn't imagine a piezo that is still active not picking up my strikes simply because they're too fast. My assumption is the brain can't keep up but, the analog switch foot triggers sure do let me unload double bass so maybe it's worth the cost and effort....
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Old 20th December 2007, 08:47 AM   #7
tjl is offline tjl  Taiwan
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I have an older Simmons SDS8 drum module, it is analog with 1/4" jacks and 5 separate drum sounds.
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You can use any kinds of disc type piezoelectric ceramic buzzer elements as drum or other percussion electronics instruments trigger input, but piezo dimension larger is better due to higher voltage output.

I have been the OEM/ODM manufacturer of ALESIS from Taiwan, cooperate and mass production all products nearly 22 years.

As my experience about drum module SR16,D4,D5..:we have a self test program built in it, push some switchs then turn on power will automatic go to self check all switchs, push buttons, display, ROMs, output channels, sound effects, and every input trigger channels ;

Input channels are triggering by a simulated piezo impulse signal generated by drum module DSP controller itself during self check.

As D4 for example, input trigger signal will send to 8 bit resolution A/D converter then to DSP module, it seems 8 bit 256 steps is enough for percussion instruments.

I often using piezo (27~35 mm) test it, even wnen my finger weak touch disc type piezoelectric ceramic buzzer elements will generate clear sound of percussion instruments.

Hope can help you!
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Old 20th December 2007, 07:04 PM   #8
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Check out the forums at

vdrums.com

edrum.info

http://users.pandora.be/philippe.ceu...drum/index.htm


just do a google on diy edrums and you will find stuff

I have been making e-drums for a couple years now, and i use piezo transducers/buzzers, they work great. there are several different methods for triggering drums, vdrums has a forum dedicated to diy edrums there is lots of info and pictures there.

Dave
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Old 21st December 2007, 04:23 AM   #9
tjl is offline tjl  Taiwan
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Thanks for these informations!
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