Go Back   Home > Forums > >
Home Forums Rules Articles diyAudio Store Blogs Gallery Wiki Register Donations FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Headphone Systems Everything to do with Headphones

Filtering higher listenable frequencies or not?
Filtering higher listenable frequencies or not?
Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 25th November 2017, 03:18 PM   #1
Decee1 is offline Decee1  Denmark
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Default Filtering higher listenable frequencies or not?

Hello out there

Currently i am building a Class A Headphone amplifier and i have a bit of a problem. I got young ears so i am really sensitive to higher frequency and i feel like sometimes when audio is not filtered aka having a nice and clean frequency response my ears are bleeding. Currently i managed to get the current respons

Click the image to open in full size.

Is audio normally filtered around 16-20KHz or am i just using too high volume? I don't feel like the volume is too high myself which is why i'm confused. Headphones i'm using are Beyerdynamics DT990 32 OHM


---Update---

Apparently Spotify has a distortion problem so you should not use it at 100% volume...

Last edited by Decee1; 25th November 2017 at 09:59 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2017, 03:55 PM   #2
Conrad Hoffman is offline Conrad Hoffman  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Canandaigua, NY USA
'Phones are usually louder than you think. So many places to have a problem. Digital will be filtered by the nature of the beast. If it's low rate MP3, it might sound pretty awful; it does to me. Above 256 it's not so bad. IMO, the amp should be flat as a board because there's no reason why not. Somewhere ahead of that you can apply some correction, if needed. We'd have to know a lot more about the source and even what type of music you listen to. IMO, there's this belief that flat response sounds best, but it doesn't seem true in practice. When everything is right you shouldn't be bleeding and there shouldn't be listening fatigue even over a long session. It may take a bit of a downward tilt to achieve that.
__________________
I may be barking up the wrong tree, but at least I'm barking!
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2017, 04:00 PM   #3
scottjoplin is offline scottjoplin  Wales
diyAudio Member
 
scottjoplin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Penrhyndeudraeth
Headphones are for listening at very low volume, that is the whole point of them, not many people are aware of this, and you are young so the chances are you are listening too loud. Turn them down, give yourself time to adjust and see how it sounds
__________________
Woofer Assisted Wideband is the New Testament renounce the anachronistic acronym FAST
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2017, 05:13 PM   #4
Decee1 is offline Decee1  Denmark
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Yeah they are, but the goal for me with the project is trying to amplify the audio signal with high impedance so it won't affect the frequency response so it sounds weird and it does indeed work and it does make it sound much better imo when listening to it
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2017, 05:15 PM   #5
Decee1 is offline Decee1  Denmark
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Listening at low volume does also make the sound less filling in the sound, when turning it up it does sound better but getting too loud is just making it sound awful. Anyways let's stay at the topic please...
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2017, 05:21 PM   #6
adason is offline adason  United States
diyAudio Member
 
adason's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Maryland
Audio signal from FM tuner and CD player are filtered above 19-20 kHz, there should be no signal in ultrasound.
LP and good reel to reel are not.

However, its possible that you may have something oscillating in your headphone amplifier in ultrasound frequencies and you do not know about it, just sense it. Check it with oscilloscope if you have chance.
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2017, 05:37 PM   #7
Decee1 is offline Decee1  Denmark
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
When i am not playing any audio i cannot hear anything, it is just when listening at higher volume i can hear the audio makes a kind of peak which is not in the amplifier part, i wonder if it is because i am using spotify at 100% volume, a few times i turned down Spotify to around 80-90% and that solved it

----UPDATE----
Apperently it is... Spotify has a problem with it clipping at 100% volume... How embarrassing for a big company like Spotify..

Last edited by Decee1; 25th November 2017 at 05:40 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2017, 05:51 PM   #8
scottjoplin is offline scottjoplin  Wales
diyAudio Member
 
scottjoplin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Penrhyndeudraeth
Is that really how the volume control on the site works? How are you connecting your headphones at the moment? The amp building is work in progress?
__________________
Woofer Assisted Wideband is the New Testament renounce the anachronistic acronym FAST
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2017, 06:14 PM   #9
Decee1 is offline Decee1  Denmark
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
If you Google "Spotify Distortion" you will get many results, apparently it is a common issue. Currently i am connecting the audio source though a USB Streamer to a PCM5102 module and then to the AMP itself, had a few people look the amp though and they are impressed by the design and also a few people have listened to it at full blast with the result they couldn't hear it clipping. So it has to be Spotify. :/
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th November 2017, 03:32 PM   #10
joztom is offline joztom  Slovenia
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Ljubljana
If you like to amplify audio signals inside all over declaring 20Hz-20 kHz, you will get about nothing in pure sinusoidal form. Every sinusoidal has implemented aliquots in triangle, saw or quadratic grass signals in it. You can imagine in 1 kHz tone with ten to hundred aliquots inside, you measure really 100kHz tone. If you once more close frequency with filters, yes, you will get frequencies, but nothing from real speech or music. Limited bandwidth is one of the biggest lie in audio dialogues. Imagine, you seat in auditorium, full of listeners and listen applause of ten thousand people, maybe the last are 200m from you. You can clear listen everybody in front of limited bandwidth your ears. This much more complicate to answer, why is this so. The fast amplifier with minimum 100V/microsec and 1MHz bandwidth are the law for good reproduction.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Filtering higher listenable frequencies or not?Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Troubleshooting - Filtering FM Frequencies shlshh Chip Amps 17 1st December 2014 01:37 AM
Why do higher frequencies get louder? triden Music 13 29th November 2007 10:30 PM
sine becomes triangle at higher frequencies rmallik Class D 7 20th September 2006 01:37 PM
Gainclone distorting in the higher frequencies jaume Chip Amps 9 26th March 2004 07:07 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 12:39 PM.


Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Resources saved on this page: MySQL 15.79%
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2018 diyAudio
Wiki