Am the only one who's not deaf....? - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Amplifiers > Headphone Systems

Headphone Systems Everything to do with Headphones

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 6th December 2012, 06:25 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Default Am the only one who's not deaf....?

Just picked up some brainwavz M5, a new IEM that is reviewed as pretty flat and neutral sounding. I currently have about a PEQ -9db Q=.5 @ 50 hz to iron out a huge bass hump, and similar but less severe cut around 5000hz (had bad silibance). Are people actually going around with sooooo much bass? Otherwise they sound pretty good.

Running off a rockboxed sansa clip+.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11th December 2012, 08:44 PM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Skokie Il
All the new designer headphones I have auditioned are garbage (expensive garbage). They are designed to be cool, not for hi-fi. Dr. Dre sounds like a ghetto trunk subwoofer, but that's what the kids grew up listening to I guess. I also auditioned another popular brand (can't think of it right now) and they were incredibly lacking in any dynamic response at all, and they were inefficient. I've heard cheap generic headphones that were so much better than the new popular headphones.
  Reply With Quote
Old 13th December 2012, 02:54 PM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Well, they do sound pretty good once EQ'd, but it's huge EQ. The review I referenced is in the huge list here:

Multi-IEM Review - 266 IEMs compared (Rock-It Sounds R-50 added 11/29/12)

Quote:
Details: Brainwavz’ fifth M-series in-ear

Current Price: $40 from amazon.com (MSRP: $49.50); $54.50 for M5 with microphone

Specs: Driver: Dynamic | Imp: 16Ω | Sens: 103 dB | Freq: 16-18k Hz | Cable: 4.3' L-plug

Nozzle Size: 5.5mm | Preferred tips: Stock (wide channel) single-flanges

Wear Style: Straight down or over-the-ear



Accessories (4.5/5) - Single-flange wide channel (3 sizes), single-flange narrow channel (3 sizes), and bi-flange silicone tips, Comply foam tips, shirt clip, and hard clamshell carrying case

Build Quality (4/5) - The M5 features lightweight aluminum shells with metal nozzle filters. The rubbery cabling is a bit thin above the y-split but strain relief is excellent all around and the new L-plug seems very durable

Isolation (3/5) – Isolation is about average for a dynamic-driver earphone and can be increase slightly with the included Comply tips

Microphonics (3.5/5) – Cable noise is bothersome when worn cable-down. Cable-up wear is recommended

Comfort (4/5) – The housings are lightweight and compact, tapering at the rear to provide a compliant, non-intrusive fit. Flexible strain reliefs and cable cinch allow for over-the-ear wear, though this may not be desirable when a mic/remote is present



Sound (7.7/10) – The newest M-series earphone from Brainwavz, the M5 seems to combine some of the best aspects from the M1 and M2 into a competent and coherent audio package. At the core of the sound is ample bass—the low end of the M5 boasts good depth, plenty of impact, and a mild mid-bass focus. Compared to the older M1, M2, and M3, the bass of the M5 is deeper, more powerful, and more dynamic. It is noticeably more detailed and effortless, and even next to the VSonic GR02 Bass Edition the M5 more than holds its own, providing a deeper, more fleshed-out low end.



Despite the powerful bass, the M5 does a reasonable job of minimizing bass bleed and bloat. Part of the reason is the prominent lower midrange of the M5 – unlike many other bass-heavy earphones the M5 isn't notably mid-recessed. The lower mids are emphasized and the entire midrange is smooth, dropping gradually in forwardness towards the top. The treble takes a small step back and clarity is pretty much the only aspect of the M5 that doesn’t surpass other earphones in its price range. Still, despite its warmer tone, the M5 is about as clear as the older M1 model. Vocal clarity and intelligibility, especially with female vocals, take a hit compared to the M1 and M2 as well as competing sets like the pricier VSonic GR06. Detail levels are better than average, however, with the M5 sounding more refined and realistic than the M2. The top end doesn’t offer up a whole lot of sparkle but extension is good for a warmer earphone. Harshness and sibilance are nonexistent – in fact, the M5 cuts down on sibilance



The presentation is affected by the laid-back treble but offers a substantial improvement over the older Brainwavz models. The M5 isn’t very airy and can get slightly congested on busy tracks but has better layering and sounds much more enveloping than the M1 and M2. The M2 especially sounds exceedingly flat and two-dimensional next to the M5. The pricier VSonic GR06, on the other hand, despite its more forward midrange, is capable of portraying a wider and more open sonic space.



Value (9.5/10) – The Brainwavz M5 is a well-built, well-accessorized, and comfortable earphone with sound that puts it at the top of its game. Its sonic signature won’t do for those looking to maximize clarity but it is sure to please fans of warmer, smoother sound. Better still, the M5 improves in many ways on the older M1, M2, and ProAlpha models without hiking up the price – an amazing accomplishment considering how far ahead of the competition the original Brainwavz earphones were upon release just a few short years ago.



Pros: Good build quality; deep bass and full, smooth sound

Cons: Average clarity
So, clearly, the review is accurate, but when the say "ample bass", I don't personally think +12 db.......lol. Here are my current PEQ settings in rockbox, which greatly improve midrage clarity:

Band Level Freq Q
LS -2.0 260 0.5
PK1 -9.5 50 0.5
PK2 0.5 800 0.5
PK3 -1.5 5000 0.5

Last edited by turbodawg; 13th December 2012 at 02:57 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 13th December 2012, 03:31 PM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Actually, this is what I have. No EQ precut in rockbox.

Band Level Freq Q
LS -2.0 260 0.5
PK1 -9.5 50 0.5
PK3 -1.5 5000 0.5

No eq in the mid, just a cut of the bass and treble.
  Reply With Quote
Old 13th December 2012, 04:24 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Skokie Il
Build a hard wired equaliser for them. I did that for my old refurbished Bose 301s and they sounded a lot better, and I got my tone controls back. I used a lot of bass boost from 70-200 Hz or so and 12 dB/octave cut below 60 Hz with slight mid/treble rise from 3 kHz-10 kHz and they sounded better- more powerful and dynamic and slightly clearer (still muddy) "bass". They're almost a silk purse from a sow's ear .
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th December 2012, 06:59 AM   #6
orpheus is offline orpheus  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: NYC
With IEMs, doesn't the seal and the tips that you use, as well as the shape and size of your ear canal effect the frequency response? Have you tried different tips and insertion depths?

I think this is a big reason why customs are so favored by reviewers, both professional and non-professional. They seem to lessen the variability in frequency response from user to user.

If you want a universal IEM with bass that is not emphasized, consider Etymotics.

I have a pair of Westone UM3X that I really like, but they (and the Ety's), cost a bit more than the Brainwavz.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th December 2012, 01:30 PM   #7
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by orpheus View Post
With IEMs, doesn't the seal and the tips that you use, as well as the shape and size of your ear canal effect the frequency response? Have you tried different tips and insertion depths?

I think this is a big reason why customs are so favored by reviewers, both professional and non-professional. They seem to lessen the variability in frequency response from user to user.

If you want a universal IEM with bass that is not emphasized, consider Etymotics.

I have a pair of Westone UM3X that I really like, but they (and the Ety's), cost a bit more than the Brainwavz.
Thanks, I have only used the tips that came installed, and played with the depth a bit. I seem to be getting a good seal because the pressure relief valve will click when I put them in.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
i'm almost deaf deafbraun Everything Else 3 10th May 2010 11:22 PM
Telephone for the very deaf? Circlotron Multi-Way 8 21st June 2009 11:45 PM
CHEAP speakers that will make me go deaf? mazeroth Multi-Way 17 27th July 2004 03:11 PM
Now I'm half deaf, but I don't care :) Bricolo Music 2 9th November 2003 12:39 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 02:28 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2