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Old 22nd September 2012, 02:27 PM   #21
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xnor no I haven't tried that. I built a 12au7/irf510 tube amp and just tsested it yesterday and it's more of what I was looking for. It's about in the middle of the cmoy and the interface in response and I'm petty happy with it as I now have a few options. I will try adding a series resistor and let you know how that goes.
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Old 24th September 2012, 08:54 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doulos24 View Post
xnor no I haven't tried that. I built a 12au7/irf510 tube amp and just tsested it yesterday and it's more of what I was looking for. It's about in the middle of the cmoy and the interface in response and I'm petty happy with it as I now have a few options. I will try adding a series resistor and let you know how that goes.
The differences you are seeing can be entirely explained by measuring the impedance of the phones at around 100Hz.

The higher the impedance of the driver, the more everything will disappear except the bass. To compensate, you will need a driver able to deliver more clean volts.

Perhaps if you looked at the phones' characteristics beforehand? Perhaps if you showed the circuit of your amp?

If you find a valve makes an improvement, you may be better off with phones not designed to make every note sound like a power chord.
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Old 25th September 2012, 12:35 AM   #23
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The differences you are seeing can be entirely explained by measuring the impedance of the phones at around 100Hz.
If that is true then how can you explain that the built in amp has the highest bump in the response and external amps have less

If it were the impedance wouldnt all amps exibit the same bump?

What makes more sense is it's the high output impedance of the line outs since the internal amp is not effected by the output it appears diffrent to the external amps. which are much more closley matched
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Old 25th September 2012, 01:59 AM   #24
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Did you measure? Do you know the output impedance of each of the amps you have driven the phones with. Did you try a resistor in series?

Consider Ohm's Law.

What "makes more sense" to you makes none to me. Perhaps it's just a punctuation thing.

We speak the truth.

No circuit, no impedance characteristics, no further comment.
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Old 25th September 2012, 05:26 PM   #25
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It's the combination of both: the impedance curve of the headphones and the output aka source impedance.

As I said before, the profire 2626 has an output impedance of 75 ohms. Your cmoy is probably close to 0 ohms.
The K240 studio has a nominal impedance of 55 ohms and about 160 ohms at 110 Hz.
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Old 25th September 2012, 09:33 PM   #26
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I'm measuring the output impedance

fast track pro 20 ohm

chu moy 3 ohm

12au7 2 ohms

Last edited by doulos24; 25th September 2012 at 09:57 PM.
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Old 25th September 2012, 10:04 PM   #27
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The point that the community is trying to make is that the impedance of the headphones is not constant with frequency. Neither is the output impedance of a tube amp (and to a lesser degree a solid state amp). All this affects the frequency response of the system.

Sometimes a series resistor can compensate for impedance induced frequency response variations. Maybe you could experiment around a little bit. Some guys have a rotary switch on their headphone amps to provide a variety of output resistors for use with different cans.
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Old 25th September 2012, 10:20 PM   #28
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Sometimes a series resistor can compensate for impedance induced frequency response variations. Maybe you could experiment around a little bit. Some guys have a rotary switch on their headphone amps to provide a variety of output resistors for use with different cans.
Interesting thanks for the reply I figure I'll just make more amp design types till I find my favorite more fun that way
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