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Old 11th September 2008, 03:10 AM   #1
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Default TPS65310 for headphone amplifier?

Texas Instruments makes a rather nice IC designed to produce a split voltage from a DC power source. I'd like to use it to step up a single lithium ion cell (3v-4.1v) to 18v to power a headphone amplifier. Can anyone recommend a good way to use it, and perhaps some filters or a secondary set of linear regulators to reduce noise?


http://focus.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/tps65130.pdf
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Old 11th September 2008, 04:57 AM   #2
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Thanks, I didn't know about this IC. It looks like the TPS65131 would be the better choice, it has over twice the current capability.

Do you need +/-18v or 18v total (+/-9v)? This IC can only do +/-15v.

I think I will give this IC a try if I can manage to handle the QFN package.

Sorry I don't have any idea about additional filtering.
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Old 11th September 2008, 04:58 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally posted by theAnonymous1
Thanks, I didn't know about this IC. It looks like the TPS65131 would be the better choice, it has over twice the current capability.

Do you need +/-18v or 18v total (+/-9v)? This IC can only do +/-15v.

I think I will give this IC a try if I can manage to handle the QFN package.

Sorry I don't have any idea about additional filtering.

+/-9v is traditional, but a bit less would be fine.
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Old 11th September 2008, 12:37 PM   #4
star882 is offline star882  United States
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Wouldn't it be better to design it with the boost disconnect on the load side? Then there'll be lower losses.
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Old 11th September 2008, 09:26 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally posted by star882
Wouldn't it be better to design it with the boost disconnect on the load side? Then there'll be lower losses.

Dunno - you tell me!
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Old 11th September 2008, 09:59 PM   #6
paulb is offline paulb  Canada
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Pretty tough to use this part without specialized surface mount equipment.
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Old 11th September 2008, 11:03 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally posted by paulb
Pretty tough to use this part without specialized surface mount equipment.

I'm hoping to bribe an electrical engineer.

It's either this or one of the National Semiconductor buck-boost converters combined with a TLE2024.
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Old 12th September 2008, 06:37 PM   #8
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I forgot to mention I built a MAX629 boost circuit with a discrete rail slitter some time ago. This was for an OPA552 headphone amp.

If you would like the first test board of the boost circuit I built you are welcome to it.

http://i19.tinypic.com/2j0zcqs.jpg
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Old 12th September 2008, 09:20 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally posted by theAnonymous1
I forgot to mention I built a MAX629 boost circuit with a discrete rail slitter some time ago. This was for an OPA552 headphone amp.

If you would like the first test board of the boost circuit I built you are welcome to it.

http://i19.tinypic.com/2j0zcqs.jpg

Much coolness!



What voltage is it set at?
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Old 13th September 2008, 11:03 AM   #10
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I don't remember exactly. I think I had it set at something like 22V even though the tantalum on the output is only a 20V.

I can adjust it to 18V for you if you would like. I never fully tested how much current it can do and I think I should have used a higher current inductor. It's enough to power two OPA552 to ear splitting levels though.
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