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Old 1st January 2010, 03:36 AM   #131
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Mine came today. Looks great and thank you for all your efforts!!! Have a great New Year everyone!
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Old 1st January 2010, 04:04 AM   #132
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Sylvain,
Got boards and JFETs. Everything came in good condition. The boards look great.
Thank you very much.
Happy New Year!
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Old 5th January 2010, 07:46 PM   #133
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Good to know. Still have a few extra PCB left. Send me an email if interested.
Bye.
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Old 6th January 2010, 01:30 AM   #134
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Hi SB

Will there be any problem if turn-pin socket is used for the opamp?
I am afraid that the socket legs inter-capacitance may cause oscillations
Is it better to use normal ic socket, ie the flat legs type?
Where to post the performance of this project?
Your recommendations will be appreciated

Audiohifi
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Old 6th January 2010, 02:56 AM   #135
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Never used a socket for the op-amp, but shouldn't make a problem if your using a lower BW op-amp. Some reported good result using the venerable LF351.

You can always solder a socket to try different IC, then remove it to solder it in place once satisfied.
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Old 8th January 2010, 11:17 AM   #136
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Sylvain,
Boards arrived today in good condition.
Thank you very much.
Happy New Year!
Dam(Jeff)
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Old 8th January 2010, 05:26 PM   #137
dbengt is offline dbengt  Sweden
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I have read hundreds of posts on this topic without finding anyone sharing their thoughts on the sonic result using this regulator. Please share thoughts!
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Old 9th January 2010, 04:22 PM   #138
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Again complete documentation is available from:

http://basenjes.de/tubes/data/sb/Shu...SB%20Notes.pdf

This doc mentionned an error on the PCB, this was only for the original PCB done by the designer. My version has no error, but it doesn`t accept the special op-amp OPA655 that needs some more 2 pins, that are not wired on this PCB version. Read the doc in details, it explains really well the in and out of this nice reg, then goes at the end for this version details, parts list, very usefull schematic with notes, typical volt readings, PCB silkscreen, etc...

This is not a beginner circuit, and need to be properly adjusted to work correctly, also it need to be always operated and adjusted with a load at its output ( I used 22K for my testing, at least 1/2W, better 1W. Never try to let it run without load, or damage or incorrect operation can be expected. You also need access to normal test gear, DVM, ampmeter, etc, and possibly scope if you experience oscillation, using a high bandwitdh op-amp. Install a socket first on the PCB (if not using a SMD device), and try different op-amp starting even with some old design such as LF351. You just need to select an op-amp with FET input, and compatible pinout and single supply compatibilty.

Also don't forget that this circuit needs an auxiliary external DC low voltage source, 15V, 50ma. You just need a small power transformer and rectifier. The filtering and regulation are done on the PCB.

Sound. Well I'm using it with my HLS line stage and EAR834P prototype phono preamp. It is black silence and improve all aspects of the sound. I'll never go back to serie regulator, for tube circuits that for sure, and I even starting to use shunt reg in all my new projects: Peter Daniel PhonoClone, Buffalo DAC with Couterpoint I/V, PPA headphones amp and B1 DC coupled preamp (Mesmerize board).
This HV Reg circuit is certainly one of the most sophisticated circuit I ever work with this topology. Great design.

For me, Shunt Reg are the way to go now

On the back burner, collecting parts, preparing to make PCB, I'm also working on a very sophisticated version of the RTP3 tube preamp (Vacuum State original design), fully balanced, dual mono, etc and guest what it will use HV shunt reg, one per channel...

Just my two cents.

Last edited by Algar_emi; 9th January 2010 at 04:36 PM.
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Old 9th January 2010, 06:37 PM   #139
dbengt is offline dbengt  Sweden
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Algar, thanks for that information. I really like your homepage aswell! You seem to have tried the most...
Look, I'm very new to DIY audio and I have a question that might be odd but that I want to ask you. Why is this regulator especially for preamps? I have read the manual and got the impression that the circuit won't provide enought power to use in a poweramp, is that right? If so, what do you use in your poweramps?

Best regards,
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Old 10th January 2010, 02:37 AM   #140
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Ok, a few basis. An audio circuit is basicaly just a power supply that is modulated by the audio signal, so often what you hear is the supply, hence the importance of the supply.

Power amp and preamp are both audio circuit, but have very different jobs. The preamp are probably the most critical because first they are the first in-line after the source (don't forget the Linn approach, the source matter the most), they have to deal with small signals that can easily be damage or change, then they deal with all the switching, interconnects, etc.

So, let say the preamp is important, and that its supply is very critical. We now have to discuss the supply. There is a few basic type of supplies, but lat say their is non regulated (open loop, no regulator), series and shunt regulated.

An open loop supply (such as favored by Ayre for example, and others) is just that, a power transformer, rectifier and caps (and or variaties of CRC, or CLC filters, etc...) They have higher source impedance (their output voltage varies more with the load), and it can change a lot with the frequency demand of the load (for example a power transistor that need to oscillate at 2 Khz and supply current, will also load the supply at this frequency). Also their CMRR (Common Mode Rejection Ratio), basically how their reduce the noise on the supply voltage is poor. So, they usually noisier...

A regulation circuit will reduce the supply output impedance, improve CMRR and can improve on its frequency response, etc... BUT

As soon as you add regulation, you also add a control loop (if you regulate an output, you need a control signal, than need to apply a correction). This correction is always in some way (phase, response time, etc) behind the load needs, so you hear the control loop of the regulator in audio application as well

So, let say regulation is probably better for a supply, then you need to decide series or shunt regulation. Here the trick, a series regulation (like most IC and supply circuit in the field) is just that, it has a control element in SERIE with the load. Advantage, it is simple to make, and is efficient (It doesn't heat, smaller part, etc...) So it is CHEAPER and EASIER, so you see them everywhere. BUT being in series, you hear the regulation circuit as well...

But in the other hand, a shunt regulation has most of the series regulator advantages, BUT is in parallel with the load, so THEY ARE NOT IN THE WAY of the supply, then usually sounds BETTER. But they regulate by sinking current to the GND for example, and need to dissipate a lot of heat (like a CLASS A amplifier for example). So they are not as efficient as Serial, more expensive (you need heatsink, etc...). So they are usually more expensive, and bigger. You won't see them in your new cell phone for sure...

This is a very simplified discussion of the basis supplies, but you're in the right direction. Supplies are very complex to analyze, and let's not get in the direction of the GND layout, GND plane, GND loop, output impedance VS frequency, supplies harmonics, noise, etc...

Just to simplify SUPPLY matter a lot to the sound, and Shunt supplies are probably better in a lot of audio applications...

As for a power amp application, then power amp needs a lot of current drive, and Shunt reg not being efficient are a real waste for power amp.
Usually some amps have only their first stage (the voltage gain stage) running on regulated supply, then run the last stage open loop (The current gain stage). There is endless variations here but you probably got the picture by now.

Last edited by Algar_emi; 10th January 2010 at 02:47 AM.
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