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Old 21st February 2010, 09:55 PM   #1101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tresch View Post
The other problem is that a bit of glue tends to seep out onto the veneer. Since I'm "clamping" them with tape, some of it seeps under the tape so I can get it off, and it soaks into the veneer and no amount of sanding will remove it. I'm assuming this is going to make the speaker un-stainable.
I have tried a mitering technique that seems to work. Read about the technique from a book called Woodworking Techniques, Essentials of woodworking from Taunton press.

The panels are ripped and crosscut to the final outer dimensions(with square edges). Then the miters are cut with the blade buried into scrap stock clamped onto the rip fence of the table saw.

Once all miters are done put the panels outer side up and align the adjoining edges, use clear packing tape to hold the joint together (like in your picture, but also put tape along the whole edge. This will give a very tight hold that prevents the glue from sipping out. If the material is pre-finished (that's what I have done) then you don't have to worry about the glue at all. As long as the materials is cut square initially all the miters should match.
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Old 21st February 2010, 11:33 PM   #1102
tresch is offline tresch  United States
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oh, hey, that's a pretty nift idea... that way you'd only have to measure out once for each angle and just slide all your pieces through. Accuracy on my miter cuts really wasn't an issue with this build, but if I can get that technique down right, it would /definitely/ shave a lot of time off the build.

I'd really like to do a small production and maybe sell some of these so.. time saved is money earned!
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Old 22nd February 2010, 08:26 PM   #1103
xTr3Me is offline xTr3Me  Germany
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tresch this looks very good.. and im sure it also sounds very well. good job!
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Old 22nd February 2010, 08:39 PM   #1104
chrisb is offline chrisb  Canada
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Originally Posted by avincenty View Post
I have tried a mitering technique that seems to work. Read about the technique from a book called Woodworking Techniques, Essentials of woodworking from Taunton press.

The panels are ripped and crosscut to the final outer dimensions(with square edges). Then the miters are cut with the blade buried into scrap stock clamped onto the rip fence of the table saw.

Once all miters are done put the panels outer side up and align the adjoining edges, use clear packing tape to hold the joint together (like in your picture, but also put tape along the whole edge. This will give a very tight hold that prevents the glue from sipping out. If the material is pre-finished (that's what I have done) then you don't have to worry about the glue at all. As long as the materials is cut square initially all the miters should match.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tresch View Post
oh, hey, that's a pretty nift idea... that way you'd only have to measure out once for each angle and just slide all your pieces through. Accuracy on my miter cuts really wasn't an issue with this build, but if I can get that technique down right, it would /definitely/ shave a lot of time off the build.

I'd really like to do a small production and maybe sell some of these so.. time saved is money earned!

If I'm reading the picture correctly, the offcut will be pinched between the sacrificial fence and the blade.

While I've used this setup myself ( as it requires no changes for width of stock), there is the very present danger of the offcut being kicked back. As safe cutting technique would ensure that you're not standing in the path, as I've found out, the real risk is in damage to any material behind you.
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Old 22nd February 2010, 09:41 PM   #1105
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Originally Posted by chrisb View Post
If I'm reading the picture correctly, the offcut will be pinched between the sacrificial fence and the blade.

While I've used this setup myself ( as it requires no changes for width of stock), there is the very present danger of the offcut being kicked back. As safe cutting technique would ensure that you're not standing in the path, as I've found out, the real risk is in damage to any material behind you.

Absolutely, you are correct, one must be carefull!!!. The small cutout below and to the left of the blade is to minimize the kickback.
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Old 23rd February 2010, 09:45 AM   #1106
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At work we´ve had to change a window glass behind the saw and install Lexan because of this.
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Old 7th March 2010, 02:26 AM   #1107
DRC59 is offline DRC59  Canada
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Originally Posted by tresch View Post
Sure!


The other problem is that a bit of glue tends to seep out onto the veneer. Since I'm "clamping" them with tape, some of it seeps under the tape so I can get it off, and it soaks into the veneer and no amount of sanding will remove it. I'm assuming this is going to make the speaker un-stainable. I'm pretty sure I just need to figure out exactly how much glue I need and not use too much, but that will always change based on how tight the angle is, etc. Hmm!
Sorry I might have pushed the wrong button If you pre-stain and apply a first coat of your finish before you cut, the glue bleed will be minimized. PVA glue doesn't seem to like to stick to glossy finish and you can most often pick off any globs with your fingernails.
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Old 9th March 2010, 02:19 PM   #1108
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Very nice concept indeed! Do you have some close-ups of that metal chassis?
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Old 13th March 2010, 06:18 PM   #1109
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Default uFonkens

a pair of uFonkens for the fireplace-fi. because my finishing skills are limited, i went with a rough, aged patina look . BB sanded with 80grit, wood conditioner, dark walnut gel-stain, and tung-oil. i'm hoping the tung-oil will yellow a bit more. otherwise, they sound great driven with the Amp4/BM DAC1.

a big thanks to Dave . i can't wait to get started on my next FF85K project for rockin' out in the man-cave.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 003.JPG (684.6 KB, 2432 views)
File Type: jpg 004.JPG (851.2 KB, 2193 views)
File Type: jpg 012.JPG (800.3 KB, 1862 views)
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Old 13th March 2010, 06:22 PM   #1110
tresch is offline tresch  United States
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Originally Posted by DRC59 View Post
Sorry I might have pushed the wrong button If you pre-stain and apply a first coat of your finish before you cut, the glue bleed will be minimized. PVA glue doesn't seem to like to stick to glossy finish and you can most often pick off any globs with your fingernails.
Oh! This is a fantastic idea! Thank you for this, as I'm about to build another similar set, this time ported using Alpair10s
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