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Wharfedale 9.6 re-foaming
Wharfedale 9.6 re-foaming
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Old 29th October 2017, 02:29 PM   #1
Rairun is offline Rairun
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Default Wharfedale 9.6 re-foaming

Hi everybody,

I have 10-year-old Wharfedale Diamond 9.6 speakers. I realized that rubber surrounds on both mid-woofers detached from the outer ring. This pic is not mine, but it's exactly the same thing:
Click the image to open in full size.

The rubber doesn't seem to rot, so I don't know why this happened. I love these speakers and want to replace the rubber surrounds. My questions:

1. Do you know where I can order high quality rubber surrounds in Germany or EU?

2. Since the rubber didn't really rot, glue on the edge of the cone won't come off easily. I don't want to damage the cone. Is it OK if I just trim the rubber surround around the edge of the cone using scissors instead of trying to peel it off? Is it really a bad idea to apply the new surround on the remaining old one? (Since it'll increase the mass)

I'm looking forward to your suggestions.

Thanks.
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Old 7th November 2017, 04:24 AM   #2
Rairun is offline Rairun
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Any more suggestion about trimming or using a solvent to remove the rubber completely? And what kind of solvent can i use?
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Old 7th November 2017, 09:07 PM   #3
chrisb is offline chrisb
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If the surrounds are still securely attached to cones, I'd be inclined to leave as is.

It's a big assumption to make, but if the failed bond to the frame is a contact cement adhesive, careful use of something like CAIG Val-U Series DCC-V510 Contact Cleaner 10 oz. or acetone and plastic scraper such as used for silicone / latex caulking could help in removable of adhesive from both surfaces, and you many not need to cut them off.

Then something like Black Rubber Cement Speaker Repair Glue 1 oz. Bottle
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Old 8th November 2017, 05:44 AM   #4
Rairun is offline Rairun
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I believe it's not the bond that failed, but the rubber. You can see from the picture that the rubber surround's torn.

I ordered this adhesive as it's highly recommended for the job on some forums:
Aleene's Always Ready Original Tacky Glue-4oz: Amazon.de: Kuche & Haushalt

I was thinking about using rubbing alcohol to clean any residue on the gasket and not mess with the remaining rubber on the cone. Because the rubber on the cone seems to securely attached to it. My only concern is that leaving the old rubber on the means added mass to cone. I just don't know if that changes the sound a lot...
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Old 8th November 2017, 03:56 PM   #5
chrisb is offline chrisb
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rairun, I took the opening post to say otherwise - ie that it was just a failure of the bond between the rubber surround and basket frame. If that's not the case, then a full resounding may not be required - there are lots of reports of band-aids with either fabric or tissue paper adhered with silicones or rubber cements.

If it's decided to replace the surrounds, I think most suitable repair parts would be sized for attachment to the cone itself, not any remaining portion of the existing surround
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Old 8th November 2017, 07:07 PM   #6
Rairun is offline Rairun
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisb View Post
rairun, I took the opening post to say otherwise - ie that it was just a failure of the bond between the rubber surround and basket frame. If that's not the case, then a full resounding may not be required - there are lots of reports of band-aids with either fabric or tissue paper adhered with silicones or rubber cements.

If it's decided to replace the surrounds, I think most suitable repair parts would be sized for attachment to the cone itself, not any remaining portion of the existing surround
You mean gluing fabric or tissue paper at the back side of rubber?

I didn't really get your second paragraph. Can you please clear it up for me?
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Old 9th November 2017, 03:43 AM   #7
MrBoat is offline MrBoat  United States
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I have replaced a fair amount of speaker surrounds. On mine, I peeled them from the cones carefully and carefully scraped the residue that was left. As long as there wasn't any lumps, traces that were still well adhered didn't hurt the subsequent bond. Careful use of scotchbrite etc. Whatever it takes. There are youtube videos that show how to do this, I am sure. You could also likely email Wharfdale for specific information.
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Old 9th November 2017, 04:03 AM   #8
Rairun is offline Rairun
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I watched a lot of you tube videos. The thing is that all of those were cases in which the surrounds were hardened/rotten.

Here a quote from another forum, someone's experience with the same speaker:

"When you get the new ring, and want to cut the old ring, do not attempt to tear off the old ring from kevlar cone. It will damage the cone. It wont work. Just cut the suspension area, leaving the remaining ring intact with kevlar. Then just glue the new ring on top of the remaining one."
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Old 9th November 2017, 07:12 AM   #9
MrBoat is offline MrBoat  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rairun View Post
I watched a lot of you tube videos. The thing is that all of those were cases in which the surrounds were hardened/rotten.

Here a quote from another forum, someone's experience with the same speaker:

"When you get the new ring, and want to cut the old ring, do not attempt to tear off the old ring from kevlar cone. It will damage the cone. It wont work. Just cut the suspension area, leaving the remaining ring intact with kevlar. Then just glue the new ring on top of the remaining one."
Strange to be able to damage Kevlar so easily, and even stranger for a speaker to be repaired in such a way being that it adds weight to the cone. Is why I suggested contacting the manufacturer. It may be something as simple as heat to remove it or a dremel.
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Old 9th November 2017, 05:03 PM   #10
chrisb is offline chrisb
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Rairun - could you post a more detailed photo of the damage?

Yes, my earlier comment referred to repairing a small tear / hole with either fabric or tissue paper - sometimes even a slice of similar material from another damaged speaker on the rear side of the surround saturated with a flexible adhesive compatible with the rubber - such as the repair adhesive cited earlier.

If the damage is too extensive for such repair, then you'll need to replace the surrounds , Even if only one is damaged, I'd always to both to ensure matched performance after repairs .

My last sentence in earlier post meant that I'd be inclined to try to remove the surround material from the cone itself. While I've not actually repaired / replaced surrounds on any speakers myself, a buddy has been doing this for over 20yrs, and the repair surrounds I've seen him use are shaped for attachment to the cones and frames directly, not to any residue of the prior piece, and I've never seen him glue a new surround to an old one.

Unless there's some uncured solvent based coating on the kevlar, any of the adhesive removers should help with detaching the surround from the cone. It certainly couldn't hurt to contact the manufacturer for answer to that question.
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