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Old 12th June 2013, 04:40 PM   #1
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Default How to fix tweeter coil cable ?

Hi folks,
sadly did not found exactly in search what I am looking for.
So my question here:
One tweeter does not work because one thin copper cable is disconnected from coil's silvercolored inside. Soldering is not possible and soldering mass could scratch the magnet. How to solve this problem best ? Thanks

Second question: it seems to be normal (had tested on working tweeter) that (+) and (-) is full conducted each other. But on amps out this means usually shortcut and here it is normal ?
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Last edited by TheDealer; 12th June 2013 at 04:44 PM. Reason: correction
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Old 12th June 2013, 04:54 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDealer View Post
Hi folks,
sadly did not found exactly in search what I am looking for.
So my question here:
One tweeter does not work because one thin copper cable is disconnected from coil's silvercolored inside. Soldering is not possible and soldering mass could scratch the magnet. How to solve this problem best ? Thanks

Second question: it seems to be normal (had tested on working tweeter) that (+) and (-) is full conducted each other. But on amps out this means usually shortcut and here it is normal ?
The repair you are asking about will not be easy.

If you can unwind one turn from the break, you can solder the end to the terminal again. It will be slightly lower in output, you may not notice.

It is also possible to pull a half inch or so off the form, solder in a new single wire, like a single strand of a 14 or 16 guage zip cord, then routh that to the terminal.

I caution you, soldering this guage wire will very very difficult. You may not be able to do it.

You may find it cheaper to buy a new tweeter than it would cost paying for psych counselling after spending a lot of time trying..or if you're old enough, the two martini's needed to forget the failed efforts.

I've done it many times (the repair, that is), but I use a stereoscope at 15 to 20X, and a fine soldering pencil...with no coffee that day. So it can be done.

BTW, if you do make the repair work, lay the wire against the form and epoxy it down...I suspect the reason it failed is it was an unsupported wire in the gap magnetic field, and it flexed to failure. Typically a consequence of clipping, as the length of unsupported vc wire resonates ultrasonically.

jn
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Old 12th June 2013, 05:30 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDealer View Post
Second question
Actually it's not really a short circuit although it appears that way. The magnet wire used for coils will have an impedance (frequency dependant resistance) when mounted in a magnetic field so the amplifier will see enough resistance to stop it from overheating. This is particularly important with the woofers as that's where the bulk of the power is used but the same applies to tweeters.
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Old 13th June 2013, 12:36 AM   #4
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Great news !
Thank you both for the worthful infos.
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Old 18th June 2013, 06:13 PM   #5
gman76 is offline gman76  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cal Weldon View Post
Actually it's not really a short circuit although it appears that way. The magnet wire used for coils will have an impedance (frequency dependant resistance) when mounted in a magnetic field so the amplifier will see enough resistance to stop it from overheating. This is particularly important with the woofers as that's where the bulk of the power is used but the same applies to tweeters.
Not sure I understand this. Is this some sort of special wire? The wire somehow goes high impedance when inside a magnetic field? I'm not sure, but I don't think so. Isn't it just the DCR of the wire that comes into play? And especially if the voice coil wire traverses an air gap, there's no thermal mass to release the local temperature increase of that portion of the wire.
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Old 18th June 2013, 09:08 PM   #6
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The voice coil has inductance due to being a coil, independent of any magnetic field. The magnetic field makes the voice coil move when AC is applied, making it an electromagnet.
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Old 18th June 2013, 09:15 PM   #7
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OP: It may be possible to buy a replacement voice coil assembly for that tweeter. What model tweeter is it?
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