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Old 8th November 2012, 09:50 PM   #41
Nanook is offline Nanook  Canada
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Default not stewing here:)

Thanks Cal. You do have a way of making me feel better...

Chris, I agree. For me there is a limit to the amount of bass I need to have a musical experience. And not all rooms can support extended deep bass.
Pano, Rullknufs, and tuxedocivic: well if the single fullrange driver is not subject to a crossover, and the woofer has its own power and bandstop (as in active amplified sub-woofer) and the tweeter uses a bandstop only...and on and on.
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Last edited by Nanook; 8th November 2012 at 09:57 PM. Reason: added cpmments re: Chris, Pano and Ruffknulls
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Old 8th November 2012, 10:38 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanook View Post
Single driver fullrange (definition): "a wideband driver that may or not be assisted by the inclusion of a tweeter or woofer or both (although they need not be) and most often used without a crossover (or a very minimalist one only at the frequency extremes if assisted)."
I made a proposal like this at Audio Circle and was almost banned. I never posted there again!

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Old 8th November 2012, 10:38 PM   #43
Squeak is offline Squeak  Denmark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanook View Post
Squeak: Quite a similar analogy using a different example than Cal's.
Not at all. Cal's examples were products that are jacks of all trades but master of none, or compromises that leaves no one truly happy.

Fullrange speakers are not that at all.
In many uses they are unequaled.
Just as a bike is unequaled for zipping quickly around in a dense, busy town like Copenhagen or Amsterdam.
Both are examples of principles of frugality, less is more, KISS, iki, Occam's razor etc.

Last edited by Squeak; 8th November 2012 at 10:44 PM.
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Old 8th November 2012, 11:10 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanook View Post
well if the single fullrange driver is not subject to a crossover, and the woofer has its own power and bandstop (as in active amplified sub-woofer) and the tweeter uses a bandstop only...and on and on.
If there are helper drivers, the fullrange driver is subject to an acoustic cross over. Even if there are no passive or electronic filters. On the low end, the box (tuning, sealed box air spring, or lack of a box) high passes, and on the top end, the driver inductance low passes.

It's a 3 way. Not trying to take away from what some people do here. And I "get" it. But in the strictist sense, it's a 3 way.
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Old 8th November 2012, 11:24 PM   #45
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Fullrange speaker is a speaker that uses a single driver to cover full specified frequency range, no matter how wide or narrow it is.

I.e., please let me repeat: FULL SPECIFIED frequency range by a SINGLE driver.
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Old 8th November 2012, 11:38 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squeak View Post
Not at all. Cal's examples were products that are jacks of all trades but master of none,
Just like a FR driver
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or compromises that leaves no one truly happy.
There are many who fit that bill.
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Fullrange speakers are not that at all.
Qué?
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In many uses they are unequaled.
Just like an All Season tire. You don't want snow tires on a smooth highway and you don't want slicks in the rain. All Season is the best choice for where I drive 10 months of the year.
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Old 9th November 2012, 12:31 AM   #47
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It's all about the x/o points (bait taken, Cal). So I vote for Wide Range in the yet to be announced poll on this recurring item. As Dave says, crossovers are evil (when jammed up our ears).
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Old 9th November 2012, 12:31 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by Wavebourn View Post
I.e., please let me repeat: FULL SPECIFIED frequency range by a SINGLE driver.
So your definition would exclude a bipole of two identical drivers? If so, what would that be? It's not a two-way, and there is no crossover, so...
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Old 9th November 2012, 12:34 AM   #49
Squeak is offline Squeak  Denmark
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Originally Posted by Cal Weldon View Post
Just like an All Season tire. You don't want snow tires on a smooth highway and you don't want slicks in the rain. All Season is the best choice for where I drive 10 months of the year.
Maybe so, but it's still not truly great at anything. That's my point.
All technology to some extent is a compromise and a weighing of factors to achieve the best result.
The best fullrange drivers however, used as single drivers, can truly excel at some types of material and/or in some environments/situations, and be merely adequate for others.
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Old 9th November 2012, 12:54 AM   #50
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Originally Posted by rjbond3rd View Post
So your definition would exclude a bipole of two identical drivers? If so, what would that be? It's not a two-way, and there is no crossover, so...
No it does not. A SINGLE driver covers THE FULL SPECIFIED range. You can use as many of them as wish, but EACH of them covers THE FULL RANGE. It does not mean that it satisfies all possible tastes and definitions of RANGES. It simply means that thee are no division between drivers in frequency ranges that they reproduce.
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