She-oak for enclosure? - Page 2 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Loudspeakers > Full Range

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 23rd March 2012, 06:15 PM   #11
chrisb is offline chrisb  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: victoria BC
Quote:
Originally Posted by Samuel Jayaraj View Post
Oak by itself is an open grain wood and it is prone to shrinkage. I have used American Oak for the facia of my kitchen cabinets and in hindsight think I made a mistake. May not even be suitable for veneer.

environmental conditions could certainly have a lot to do with that - kitchens are not know for carefully controlled heat / humidity

as a veneer bonded directly to a plywood or MDF/PB core, or even applied post fabrication of carcass would likely be less problematic - it's the potential movement of solid hardwood cabinet panels that can cause the problems - some species far more than others.
__________________
you don't really believe everything you think, do you?
community sites t-linespeakers.org, frugal-horn.com commercial site planet10-HiFi
  Reply With Quote
Old 23rd March 2012, 06:16 PM   #12
diyAudio Member
 
prairieboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Samuel Jayaraj View Post
Oak by itself is an open grain wood and it is prone to shrinkage. I have used American Oak for the facia of my kitchen cabinets and in hindsight think I made a mistake. May not even be suitable for veneer.
It doesn't matter if wood is open grain or not (ie maple) it always moves across the grain from moisture, and no finish in the world will prevent that (a finish will only slow the process)
  Reply With Quote
Old 23rd March 2012, 09:06 PM   #13
SCD is offline SCD  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: 1/2 way up Vancouver Island
Default Real wood and stuff

Hello guys:
I work with real wood a lot and have made quite a few sets of speaker cabinets from Douglas-fir, Yellow Cedar, Big leaf Maple, etc.
here are few principles I follow:
Kilm dry the wood to 6% moisture first. If possible leave the lumber in the same room as the finished product is going go for a few weeks or months. This will allow the wood to restabilse to the same moisture content as the room. If not leave in the house somewhere to come back up to house moisture content This ususally around 15% for me. It is dried to 6% to colapse the tilosis and ensure all water bounded to the resins is driven off. The kiln temperature is different for each wood with the more resinous ones being a bit warmer.

I generally use only tight grained wood with the grain on edge or at 45' to the surface. I do not use wood with knots or really wide grain for cabinets.

For large panels I rip the pieces and laminate with biscuits alternating the cup direction. Ripped pieces are usually not wider than 4 inches.

Once the box is constructed I seal all surfaces inside and out with Varathane natural oil. Any other oil that has susupended plastics and driers will also work. The objective here is to ensure the rate of moisture exchange is same on all surfaces.

I expect a little bit of shrinkage so I leave a bit of slack when installing braces I use chaulk to glue the braces in place. (this was learned the hard way, with a fonken split in my fonken)

I spray on Eurothane finish but any other finish will work fine.

Just for sport I put stone bases on most of my work.

For me the secret is to ensure the wood has been properly dried to get as much moisture out as possible. I like 6%, then allow to come up to house humidity. Air dried lumber does not work for me. It moves too much.

A well designed, well constructed cabinet is a pleasure to listen to and stare at.

I hope this helps
__________________
SCD
  Reply With Quote
Old 23rd March 2012, 09:43 PM   #14
chrisb is offline chrisb  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: victoria BC
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCD View Post
Hello guys:
I work with real wood a lot and have made quite a few sets of speaker cabinets from Douglas-fir, Yellow Cedar, Big leaf Maple, etc.
here are few principles I follow:
Kilm dry the wood to 6% moisture first. If possible leave the lumber in the same room as the finished product is going go for a few weeks or months. This will allow the wood to restabilse to the same moisture content as the room. If not leave in the house somewhere to come back up to house moisture content This ususally around 15% for me. It is dried to 6% to colapse the tilosis and ensure all water bounded to the resins is driven off. The kiln temperature is different for each wood with the more resinous ones being a bit warmer.

I generally use only tight grained wood with the grain on edge or at 45' to the surface. I do not use wood with knots or really wide grain for cabinets.

For large panels I rip the pieces and laminate with biscuits alternating the cup direction. Ripped pieces are usually not wider than 4 inches.

Once the box is constructed I seal all surfaces inside and out with Varathane natural oil. Any other oil that has susupended plastics and driers will also work. The objective here is to ensure the rate of moisture exchange is same on all surfaces.

I expect a little bit of shrinkage so I leave a bit of slack when installing braces I use chaulk to glue the braces in place. (this was learned the hard way, with a fonken split in my fonken)

I spray on Eurothane finish but any other finish will work fine.

Just for sport I put stone bases on most of my work.

For me the secret is to ensure the wood has been properly dried to get as much moisture out as possible. I like 6%, then allow to come up to house humidity. Air dried lumber does not work for me. It moves too much.

A well designed, well constructed cabinet is a pleasure to listen to and stare at.

I hope this helps
great to hear from you again Scott - OK, now it's time to show off with some pictures, particularly if there's been any recent builds
see you in August?
__________________
you don't really believe everything you think, do you?
community sites t-linespeakers.org, frugal-horn.com commercial site planet10-HiFi
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th March 2012, 12:31 AM   #15
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
not sure what to take from this thread.

the wood is in ply form and i think also larger boards, its reclaimed (will be selecting the bits i want) so presumably any major shrinking etc would have already occurred?

is it possible to get a sticky somewhere with a list of tried and test build materials outside of MDF and birch ply?
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th March 2012, 12:39 AM   #16
frugal-phile(tm)
diyAudio Moderator
 
planet10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Victoria, BC, NA, Sol III
Blog Entries: 5
Plywood should be good (if void free and well made). Really old rectcled hardwood often has a big advantage over fresh stuff, Scott's fir speakers were from recycled railway bridge ~a century old, and Bernie's fir was put down as flooring in his house some 70 years ago.

dave
__________________
community sites t-linespeakers.org, frugal-horn.com, frugal-phile.com ........ commercial site planet10-HiFi
p10-hifi forum here at diyA
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th March 2012, 12:48 AM   #17
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by planet10 View Post
Plywood should be good (if void free and well made). Really old rectcled hardwood often has a big advantage over fresh stuff, Scott's fir speakers were from recycled railway bridge ~a century old, and Bernie's fir was put down as flooring in his house some 70 years ago.

dave
will report back with some pictures of what they have at the yard and see what everyone thinks out of the choices.

thanks to all that replied so far.
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th March 2012, 02:17 AM   #18
evanc is offline evanc  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: New Jersey. About 1 hour from NYC and 1 min. from the beach
If you can get large boards of the wood you showed pics of in the original post do not pass it up. Solid is a pleasure to work with compared to plywood, and with some thought and good quality joinery will make a box that will stay together as well as any. I'm in Nj....are you local?
Evan
__________________
http://www.evancotler.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th March 2012, 02:27 AM   #19
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by evanc View Post
If you can get large boards of the wood you showed pics of in the original post do not pass it up. Solid is a pleasure to work with compared to plywood, and with some thought and good quality joinery will make a box that will stay together as well as any. I'm in Nj....are you local?
Evan
actually UK but i can't figure out how to change my location in the user profile part.

my end plan once i've played with cheap drivers and various enclosures will be to make a nice BLH with some uber drivers, a double mouthed thing carved from a solid chunk of something. until then i'm just learning stuff you guys already know from past mistakes and experiences.
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th March 2012, 02:44 AM   #20
frugal-phile(tm)
diyAudio Moderator
 
planet10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Victoria, BC, NA, Sol III
Blog Entries: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by gafhenderson View Post
actually UK but i can't figure out how to change my location in the user profile part.
I fixed that for you.

dave
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Solid oak speakers??? tman204 Multi-Way 82 29th May 2014 03:29 PM
pine or oak for baffle? Binkstir Full Range 15 29th November 2006 03:55 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 01:16 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2