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Old 18th December 2007, 06:49 PM   #11
Kensai is offline Kensai  United States
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Bass Reflex

sorry about that

Kensai
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Old 18th December 2007, 09:31 PM   #12
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John L, I forgot to mention that for my Chang cabinet I am using the exact tweeter with good results. I stepped up to that one for the slightly more power handling then the one Gychang used and it has done well for me

Good luck!

Edit: I also have the Dayton SD215! How curious, currently it is in a TL, but it will be in a back loaded pipe horn (ala BIB) for HT duty...Its a great subwoofer for the money...
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Old 18th December 2007, 09:34 PM   #13
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These are coming out really great! I can't wait to hear them!
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Old 18th December 2007, 09:59 PM   #14
John L is offline John L  United States
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Thanks guys.

First, I forgot to include this above. It is the carcus completely enclosed. The Duo-Fast on top of the cabinet is what I used to fasten the braces to the walls. They put in a nice staple and hold things together quite well.

Click the image to open in full size.

Here is the carcus, after I have filled in all the brad and staple holes and sanded them smooth. I left the walls a bit rough, since they will hold glue better.

Click the image to open in full size.

My next step will be to make the top panel, where the driver will be held, and the base portion. Once that is complete, I will start on the second cabinet, and finish it before starting the veneering.
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Old 18th December 2007, 10:20 PM   #15
defect9 is offline defect9  Ireland
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I gotta say, since watching you plan this project from nearly the get-go, I'm impressed. Not a clue how it'll sound, but just in the fact that you don't give up. IF nothing else, you're going to learn a lot, and if everything goes according to plan, you'll end up with a rockin' set of speakers to boot. I really hope they turn out well.

-Jared
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Old 30th December 2007, 05:44 PM   #16
John L is offline John L  United States
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Now that the holidays are over, and Mother has left, I can get back to the project. Before Christmas, I had sanded down the one carcus that I had put together. Then I went about trying to concoct something for the base stand. I thought about using MDF, but since I was already using cabinet grade plywood, I decided to continue with the same material.

After several attempts I came up with this one. I still have not beveled the edges yet, and can't make up my mind whether to make the bevel a straight angle, or use a round over bit. I am thinking roundover because the top difraction will be rounded, and everything else will be straight lines. Some rounding may be necessary to give it a smoother apearance.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

Yesterday, I started on the second carcus, by taking the 24 inch wide cut of plywood, and cutting it in half, so each piece would be approximately 48" in length. The hand cut side would be rough, and since I do not have room for a nice radial arm saw, I considered how to use my skill(Porter Cable) saw on the back decking.

I realized that the initial carcus was done one piece at a time, in custom fashion, and that took a great deal of time. So this time, I wanted to use the fruits of my learning and make things go a little bit faster.

So, I placed the two pieces on the portable saw horses, and pretty much lined them up. Here you can see the rough ends, with the top piece pushed back some.

Click the image to open in full size.

Here I have the pieces clamped down, and marked out to the 40 inches length, just as the first one. Then I measured out the distance of cut from the edge of my saw, and got ready to make the cut.

Click the image to open in full size.

Opps, my first mistake of the day. I measured from the wrond side of the saw. Because when I went to cut it out, the motor got in the way of the clamp holding down the level straight edge. Since I am left handed, I naturally try to do things with the left hand, and almost everything made for anything is made strictly for righties. It's simple discrimination, but life in general.

Once I made the remeasurement, I relocated the edge, and set it up for the cut.

Click the image to open in full size.

In order to prevent needless chipping, I applied a strip of painter's tape across the surface needing to be cut outl It really wasn't necessary, because I intended to trim off the ends of both sides in the end, but it is a very good habit to do in all cuts with a skil saw.

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Old 30th December 2007, 05:57 PM   #17
John L is offline John L  United States
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Once I had the two pieces of plywood cut evenly at 24" X 45 inches, I took them down to the basement workshop, and started setting them up for cutting at 30% angles. I can get three nice cuts with each 24 inch wide section and some left over for margin by flipping the stock 180% after each cut. This will work well, as long as the angle is correct, so I will always get a 30% cut regardless which side of the material I use. And since I had already set up a template to start, and cut the first set, this did not take all that long to do.

One thing that bothers me with making such cuts is the sawdust that it generates. I have a special vacuum set-up on my Craftsman saw, as you can see in the next picture. But in order to make all the cuts at the necessary angle, I was forced to remove the guard and it's attachment. This left me with a lot of sawdust in the shop and all over myself.

Click the image to open in full size.

The origonal rip fence that came with the saw, back in 1981, was terrible. About ten or twelve years ago, I upgraded to the Alignarip fence, and it really makes the difference in making a great cut with the saw. The motor is a 2 hp belt drive, and I converted it to 230 volts a couple of years after purchasing it. The 230 volt change has made all the difference in the world. No matter what I run through it, it will never burn the motor out.

My next upgrade will be to get rid of the blade guard, which is too open and dangerous. I just never got around to it. BTY, I am president of Procrastinator's International, Cary Branch.

Click the image to open in full size.

One of the things I always do is make a test cut, until it comes out exactly as I want it to be. I went through several cuts until I got the exact 8 inch width I was looking for.

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Old 30th December 2007, 06:13 PM   #18
John L is offline John L  United States
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One of the big advantages of using a dado blade set is that you can make custom dados on the table saw, and it makes your life much easier, instead of having to mark, clamp, and make individual passes with the router. For years I did this, and this project finally convinced me that it was past time to go out and invest in this expensive(or so I thought) investment.

The reason why I use the "or so I thought" phrase is because I know that dado blade sets almost always cost over $100 and can run up to $300 with some of the high dollar name brands. But after checking up on the Harbor freight web site, I found their dado set to be far less in cost. In fact the total cost, at your local store, is the same as on the web site, $26.99 . Believe me, this is indeed a Steal!, and anyone owning a table saw should be on the way out the door to get one as I speak. Granted, it may not be as good as a Freud, but since I don't use it day in and day out, It is more than good enough for my purposes.

Here is another thing, concerning dado blades. With them mounted on the table saw, you can no longer use your present blade guard. This means that you must make one of your own custom guards. And this is to your advantage, because with a custom blade guard you can raise the rotating blade, cutting into it, and removing only that part that is necessary to allow the blade to stick above the table.

The distinct advantage is that small pieces of wood do not get sucked into the body of the table saw, blocking up the vacuum hose underneath, and the amount of saw dust is cut to a bare minimum. If you have your saw hooked up to a vacuum, then it will suck almost all the dust into the vacuum attachment, and it will not go all over the room. And by adding a custom plastic fence guard, which has a hose sticking out the top, it will also suck up any dust that fails to make it into the body of the saw. That way you get absolutely no dust floating loose, or almost no dust. That is another reason why I need to get rid of my current blade guard and make a custom one.

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Old 30th December 2007, 06:23 PM   #19
Eva is offline Eva  Spain
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Why not an odd number of faces to avoid standing waves due to parallel surfaces?
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Old 30th December 2007, 06:27 PM   #20
John L is offline John L  United States
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Quote:
Originally posted by Eva
Why not an odd number of faces to avoid standing waves due to parallel surfaces?
Come again? I am not following you here.
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