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Old 1st November 2007, 10:40 PM   #1
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Default Acoustically Transparent Fabric

From the web ...
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Radio Silks specialize in supplying loudspeaker grille cloth, the material is supplied in a pack containing 1.42 square meters of cloth, enough to cover the grilles of most domestic loudspeakers.

The cloth is specially produced for loudspeakers, it is acoustically transparent and is as currently used by a number of major hi-fi manufacturers. It is perfect for replacing damaged grilles, or if you just want to change the colour to match a new colour scheme.
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I am undecided as to final finishes, but may consider some of this stuff for the front of a Sachiko Horn. While 100% acoustical transparency is obviously impossible - would I notice any difference in a double blind test?

Most horns in the galleries proudly display their woodwork and drivers - which is OK. But Plenty of high-end speakers have fabric, so cant be total sonic poison!
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Old 1st November 2007, 11:37 PM   #2
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I am already liking this thread, in for some good information/debating
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Old 2nd November 2007, 01:41 AM   #3
adason is offline adason  United States
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Often the problem is not the fabric, but the frame itself, which is causing diffraction.
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Old 2nd November 2007, 05:07 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally posted by adason
Often the problem is not the fabric, but the frame itself, which is causing diffraction.
good point! So what if you used a very thin but strong material with little ductility, as the frame for the fabric, with four pegs on the corners (or more) to mount it on the enclosure and space it out to allow woofer excursion?
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Old 2nd November 2007, 05:14 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally posted by adason
Often the problem is not the fabric, but the frame itself, which is causing diffraction.
indeed it is the frame that causes the most problems.

Most hi-end speakers advise you that they are best without the grills -- the big Focals had/have solid wood grills for instance.

Regular doubleknit makes pretty good grill cloth.

dave

PS: how much they charge for 1.42 m^2 that stuff?
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Old 2nd November 2007, 08:51 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally posted by planet10


indeed it is the frame that causes the most problems.

Most hi-end speakers advise you that they are best without the grills -- the big Focals had/have solid wood grills for instance.

Regular doubleknit makes pretty good grill cloth.

dave

PS: how much they charge for 1.42 m^2 that stuff?
UKP 29.38 inc VAT and Carriage

Re the frame - well the fe206e does not stick its whizzer above driver profile, so a tiny baton round the entire speaker edge would be enough to lift the fabric out of harms way.

My current TLs have removable covers on a wooden frame which goes round the entire front edge of the speaker. I have listened both on and off. I cannot (and I have very fussy ears) hear a difference.

But I will be experiencing - as I can already hear as the fe206es break in - a new level of transient response, detail, and mid-range transparency.

Perhaps I will build them ... try my current speakers covers on (would only cover the centre part though) and then decide. This is a Spring project.

Our local DIY store also has various wire-mesh panels available. These might look cool - but I have not seen mesh on speakers - (apart from the protective plastic mesh on stage gear). Any thoughts?
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Old 2nd November 2007, 09:45 AM   #7
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I once used wire-mesh on a wooden frame that I covered by some type of filter-mat. The filter mat was "glued" to the wire mesh by some dots of solicone sealer.

This is the speaker:

http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/showt...05#post1266505

The material is something like this:

http://www.niersbachtal.de/product_i...93b09522fd0b61

Wheter the method is suitable for HiFi speakers has to be tried out.

Regards

Charles
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Old 2nd November 2007, 11:01 AM   #8
Colin is offline Colin  United Kingdom
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The problem with a lot of commercial speakers is that the grille is included as an afterthought for appearance reasons. If designed as part of the speaker from the beginning, with proper attention to the frame, diffraction, etc, it would be less acoustically intrusive.

Linn (I think) had a neat system where the frabric had elasticated edges and a groove was rebated into the sides and top/base of the enclosure - a sort of hifi hair net. No frame needed, just some felt to offset the fabric and stop it touching the drivers.
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Old 2nd November 2007, 11:04 AM   #9
Colin is offline Colin  United Kingdom
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Oh yes, regarding mesh. You need to be very careful that it doesn't resonate. Depending on the design, it can also be 'sided' - Peter Baxendale produced a design in the 1960s which had a wire mesh front and he commented that it would attenuate treble less if used one way rather than the other. (The mesh had a slant to the individual holes.) On the whole, I think I'd avoid it for hifi use.
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Old 3rd November 2007, 05:00 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by Alan Hope
UKP 29.38 inc VAT and Carriage
Here 2 m^2 of double knit is just under UKP 10

dave
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