Recording Dynamic compression Reality - Page 2 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > General Interest > Everything Else

Everything Else Anything related to audio / video / electronics etc) BUT remember- we have many new forums where your thread may now fit! .... Parts, Equipment & Tools, Construction Tips, Software Tools......

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 28th May 2006, 07:20 AM   #11
diyAudio Member
 
Geek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Quote:
Originally posted by fab
Where do you get "lossless downloads of Jazz"?
Usenet
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th May 2006, 07:33 AM   #12
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Default Compression is Old Hat

One of the things I think is so strange is that there was a time when all recorded music was on uncompressed 78 rpm phenolic discs. Then, there were Melchoir (sp?) compressors that were made with tubes. They were used because sound covered 120 dbs of dynamics, but phonograph records and magnetic tape could only do about 80 db.

Then we got the 44.1ksps 16bit linear thing on CDs, and the dynamic range was supposed to get better, except that in most cases it didn't because the electronics used to create rock and jazz and whatever were noisier than that.

Now we have "perceptual coding" Frauenhoffer MP3 that deliberately leaves out sounds that the perceptual coder doesn't think we are going to hear or that are "unimportant" to the sound. Which is like telling someone that they are going to try removing things from your dinner plate until you notice and then "perceptually encode" your dinner to only contain the food that is "important".

Let me tell you what technology has done for us. We can record our own music at a level of quantization and sampling rates that will blister the paint right off your walls.

The new sound cards from Creative / eMu will sample at 192ksps with 24 bit quantization all day. Thanks to 250GB hard drives, we could care less what the storage space is. We can record hours of music at 120dbs of dynamic range with a sampling rate that captures every nuance of the performance.

And it's cheap! A pair of factory matched Rode NT1A-MP microphones in the hard case with factory shock mounts is under $500 US. You can make your own really quiet OPA627 preamp for under $600, and the mike stands and booms are cheap. When you are done, the self noise of your home recording system is so low that you have over 100dbs of usable dynamics.

All that's left is for you to bring in your own local talent and burn up some disc drive space. When you are done, you can produce your own CDs, uncompressed, unequalized, uncontaminated. And at a cost to you that is less than you would pay for a top-quality power amp.

The big recording companies can try to push us around, but as the title at the top of the page says, we are the fanatics. If we want to step outside the box and do our own uncompressed recordings, we can.

We have the technology.
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th May 2006, 09:05 PM   #13
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: North Derbyshire
Quote:
Originally posted by davidsrsb
Hint - do you REALLY need to amplify drums in a small restaurant?
You do when the guitarist is playing through a 500W 8x12 stack, and the bass player is running 2KW to compete. Acoustic drums are generally supposed to be about 60W, so keep the guitar to about 60W (transistor), and the bass to about double that. For valve amps try 25W guitar, and 50W bass.

Everyone seems to use more and more power, and the poor little drummer can't do anything about it - unless he's PA'd as well.
__________________
Nigel Goodwin
  Reply With Quote
Old 28th May 2006, 10:46 PM   #14
diyAudio Member
 
I_Forgot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Phoenix, Az.
Quote:
Originally posted by fab
[B]QUOTE]Originally posted by I_Forgot
[B]
So you really mean that it is when the transmssion of the music from the original media into the CD that the dynamic compression is done? The original mix does not have compression and is available for download?
Yes. Original multitrack recordings have very little compression. The final mix down to the CD is where most of the compression is added. You and I can't get at the multitrack recordings (nor would we want it- it takes a lot of training and some talent to mix the multitrack into a decent sounding two channel recording) but the guys selling songs for DL can. So they will be able to make a "quality" mp3 file where you and I are stuck with the cr*p CD as a source, at least until you can't buy newly pressed CDs anymore.

Maybe they make cr*ppy sounding CDs so they can sell a remixed version again to the same people who bought the first one...

I_F
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
FYI: Tom Danley's no compression fireworks recording......... GM Full Range 43 10th May 2014 07:16 AM
Vinyl Record Cutting Dynamic Range Compression oldheathkitphil Analogue Source 25 1st May 2008 06:52 AM
intentional dynamic compression for MP3's squib Digital Source 11 14th April 2008 05:16 AM
Dynamic range compression & FPGA marco72 Digital Source 2 24th March 2006 10:55 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 12:51 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2