DIY CD "scratch doctor" - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > General Interest > Everything Else

Everything Else Anything related to audio / video / electronics etc) BUT remember- we have many new forums where your thread may now fit! .... Parts, Equipment & Tools, Construction Tips, Software Tools......

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 20th December 2005, 05:58 AM   #1
jives11 is offline jives11  Europe
diyAudio Member
 
jives11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Hampshire
Default DIY CD "scratch doctor"

Hi,

I have bought a few CD's second hand for a few pennies. They are badly scratched, mostly play but skip in a few places.

I have seen a number of abrasive CD repair systems, I wonder what peoples experience of such devices is and if there are any 'home grown' alternatives.

All my Cd's are kept clean , but it would be fun to see if these discarded ones could be repaired
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th December 2005, 08:47 AM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Sweden
First try improving the CDs themselves. Rubbing with toothpaste and some water has improved scratchy CDs considerably for me.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th December 2005, 09:46 AM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: South Manchester, UK
Question CD Repairs

Hi - first post on this site. I just bought a very rare CD that the vendor told me "played perfectly" but my Yamaha DVD player, Aiwa XC-700 CD player and Marantaz DR700 CD recorder skip like mad when they play it - the Yamaha less than the others though...

I moaned to the vendor who gave me part of my money back, so now I've ordered Wipe Out Ultra which is supposed to let you polish out quite bad scratches. Unlike the earlier Wipe Out (and toothpaste) it's not supposed to leave a white haze on the disc.

I ordered this today so I'll try it and report back to you.
__________________
Chris Mann
"don't use your brain as a notepad - use a notepad"
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th December 2005, 10:05 AM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
EchoWars's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Left of the Dial
I use Meguiars plastic polish.
This:
Click the image to open in full size.
Followed by this:
Click the image to open in full size.

I used to use automotive rubbing compound (the white light-duty stuff) followed by regular auto wax. Works well, but the Meguiars works better.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th December 2005, 11:44 AM   #5
jives11 is offline jives11  Europe
diyAudio Member
 
jives11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Hampshire
Default Re: CD Repairs

Quote:
Originally posted by planetbass
Hi - first post on this site. I just bought a very rare CD that the vendor told me "played perfectly" but my Yamaha DVD player, Aiwa XC-700 CD player and Marantaz DR700 CD recorder skip like mad when they play it - the Yamaha less than the others though...

I moaned to the vendor who gave me part of my money back, so now I've ordered Wipe Out Ultra which is supposed to let you polish out quite bad scratches. Unlike the earlier Wipe Out (and toothpaste) it's not supposed to leave a white haze on the disc.

I ordered this today so I'll try it and report back to you.
Thanks I'm interested to hear how you get on. Oddly the CD player I have which is the least fussy about condition is an old Philips CD104. It will play almost anything including CD-R's that my newer player or DVD will not touch. They don't make em like that anymore
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th December 2005, 08:10 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: West London
Mur car polish is very good becase it's very slightly abrasive.

I have used it on CDs and bike helmet visors with great results it actually polishes the scratches out, the visors are cleaned regularly and the scratches never reappear so it isn't the coating it leaves that does the trick.

It also keeps dust of TV and pooter screens for ages longer than using just a normal cleaner.

Works pretty well on cars and bikes too
  Reply With Quote
Old 23rd December 2005, 07:46 AM   #7
jives11 is offline jives11  Europe
diyAudio Member
 
jives11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Hampshire
Thanks to one & all for the suggestions.


I tried the toothpaste trick & it works (mostly). In a cupboard I had a free sample of "Arm & Hammer" brand toothpaste. This has bicarbonate of soda in it, so I guess may be a slighly more abrasive toothpaste than the usual stuff.


It certainly got rid of much of the jumps later in the disk, though alas I still have a persistent skip in the middle of the Bruch Violin Concerto Adagio. A bad place

Q: I know CD's are read from the middle out. Is there a method to figure out how many minutes into a disk relates to a specific radius. Even approx. it would be useful to know that 10 mins in relates to approx 1cm from the edge of the center hole, or am I oversimplifying ? It's just it would be nice to know where to concentrate my polishing
  Reply With Quote
Old 23rd December 2005, 08:45 AM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Sweden
Quote:
Originally posted by jives11


I tried the toothpaste trick & it works (mostly). In a cupboard I had a free sample of "Arm & Hammer" brand toothpaste. This has bicarbonate of soda in it, so I guess may be a slighly more abrasive toothpaste than the usual stuff.
I'm glad to hear it worked for you too. Actually I don't think it's the chemicals in the toothpaste that matters, but what they put in it to get a mild sanding effect (not sure what to properly call it in english).

I also had a CD with very bad scratches that I bought on Portobello Road 15 years ago. In particular it had one scratch in the second movement of Schuberts 9th that made my CD player would´t get past. It got trapped in a five second loop that just repeated indefinitely. The toothpaste was never sufficient to make this scratch unnoticeable, but at least the CD became playable past this point. I used a particularly gentle tootpast, but I guess a standard one might work better.
  Reply With Quote
Old 23rd December 2005, 10:02 PM   #9
Ron E is offline Ron E  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Ron E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: USA, MN
Quote:
Originally posted by Christer
Actually I don't think it's the chemicals in the toothpaste that matters, but what they put in it to get a mild sanding effect (not sure what to properly call it in english).
That would be "abrasive".

One of my other hobbies is amateur telescope making. I have some mirror grinding abrasives. Cerium Oxide polishing compound made into a paste and rubbed in with a finger works quite well for removing fine scratches. using 10 micron first will get out many deeper scratches, and using a progression of abrasives is required for the really deep ones.

One thing that might make an unplayable disc playable is to try Pledge spray on furniture wax. When I was young my aunt used to use this on her glasses to cover up scratches. I thought she was crazy, but it really works - only until you wash them, though. I wouldn't recommend this as a long term solution, because CD plastic is quite vulnerable to chemical attack, but it might work temporarily or long enough to rip a copy of the CD.
__________________
Our species needs, and deserves, a citizenry with minds wide awake and a basic understanding of how the world works. --Carl Sagan
Armaments, universal debt, and planned obsolescence--those are the three pillars of Western prosperity. —Aldous Huxley
  Reply With Quote
Old 26th December 2005, 08:37 PM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: West London
Quote:
Originally posted by jives11


Q: I know CD's are read from the middle out. Is there a method to figure out how many minutes into a disk relates to a specific radius. Even approx. it would be useful to know that 10 mins in relates to approx 1cm from the edge of the center hole, or am I oversimplifying ? It's just it would be nice to know where to concentrate my polishing
You should be able to see the gaps between the tracks on the surface of the CD.

10 mins in from the start is about 5mm in from the center.

It's not that easy to work out mathematically and virtually impossible to measure accurately as such... I looked on a CD with a 10 min song as the first track.

Useless info about CDs

The speed of the CD varies from 200 to 500 RPM

The track width is 0.8 um and the gap between tracks is 1.6 um.

The total track length for a CD is over 60,000 meters.

1 minute of audio is about 822 meters of physical track.

When CDRs first came out, for each CD that reached the required standard, 15 were thrown away because of manufacturing defects.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Calling John *Zaph*... 5.25" midwoofer designed/built from scratch OlogyAudio Multi-Way 19 24th August 2011 07:44 PM
What makes an amplifier "bright", "warm", or "neutral"? JohnS Solid State 51 13th December 2009 06:42 PM
My first "from scratch" design, SE KT88.......... cadaverdog Tubes / Valves 9 8th April 2008 06:39 AM
"Fisher Doctor" VadimB Tubes / Valves 0 6th June 2006 07:44 PM
DIY "Final Scratch" Turntable DSP Ignite Digital Source 5 25th February 2002 11:52 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 05:49 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2