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-   -   PCB Trace Width Current rating?? (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/everything-else/45723-pcb-trace-width-current-rating.html)

Zero Cool 14th November 2004 09:26 PM

PCB Trace Width Current rating??
 
Is there a standard that determins trace width based on current?

IE, if i have a 2 oz copper board, how do i determin how wide the traces need to be at minimum for a given current rating???


Zero

Tim__x 14th November 2004 09:34 PM

http://www.ultracad.com/ipcchart.htm

Pjotr 14th November 2004 09:40 PM

Indeed Tim,

Also

http://www.ultracad.com/pcbtemp.pdf

and the free calculator:

http://www.ultracad.com/pcbtemp.zip

;)

Zero Cool 14th November 2004 09:47 PM

Thank you!!!


Zero

resolution 15th November 2004 07:55 AM

Try this :)

http://www.geocities.com/suppanz/TraceWidth.xls

gmphadte 16th November 2004 06:16 AM

good reading material at
www.elfa.se
The file is fakta.pdf

peranders 16th November 2004 07:31 AM

Re: PCB Trace Width Current rating??
 
Quote:

Originally posted by Zero Cool
Is there a standard that determins trace width based on current?

IE, if i have a 2 oz copper board, how do i determin how wide the traces need to be at minimum for a given current rating???


Zero

If you have a specific problem, let's hear it and I will tell you if it's alright or not.

Zero Cool 21st November 2004 08:36 PM

Thanks for the info.

I was trying to determin how wide i needed to make traces for a Power Supply PCB.

If the supply is rated for 70-100Vdc at at least 10 amps, how wide do i need to make the traces with a 2 oz copper PCB???

If i understand the info correctly, a 420mil wide traces will work and have a 10 deg C temp rise.

But, what is allowable for temp rise? what is a standard temp rise number?

Thanks resolution for the XLS chart. that works well.


Zero

Mike Gergen 21st November 2004 08:47 PM

Zero Cool
If you are interested send me an email. I have a copy of the PCB engineering handbook that will give you more info then you could possibly use. (NOT)

We're both in the TC's, I can get it to you.
Mike

peranders 21st November 2004 08:48 PM

150 mils 1 oz. copper, 20A => the copper gets warm.

100 mils, 2 oz. 10 A is really OK but if you can make it wider do so. You must also consider the short circuit current and how big you fuses are. Can the pcb handle a short circuit?

My recomendation is 150 mils at least but 200-300 mils better if you can.

Max temp is 130-150 deg but the pcb will eventually get brown/black. Strive for max 60-80 degrees C.


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