Peliter cooling question - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > General Interest > Everything Else

Everything Else Anything related to audio / video / electronics etc) BUT remember- we have many new forums where your thread may now fit! .... Parts, Equipment & Tools, Construction Tips, Software Tools......

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 24th June 2002, 02:40 PM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Tyrone Ga. U.S.A.
Default Peliter cooling question

I have seen some refferences to Peliter cooling but haven't
found anything that my math challenged mind understands.
How efficent is Peliter cooling say compaired to a typical A/C
unit or if you wanted to transfer 100 watts from a bank of mosfets
to a heat sink with a 50 degree C difference how much energy would the Peliter units need to do this.

Thanks in advance

Woody AKA bob12345678
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th June 2002, 02:44 PM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: London UK
Default Re: Peliter cooling question

Quote:
Originally posted by bob12345678
I have seen some refferences to Peliter cooling but haven't
found anything that my math challenged mind understands.
How efficent is Peliter cooling say compaired to a typical A/C
unit or if you wanted to transfer 100 watts from a bank of mosfets
to a heat sink with a 50 degree C difference how much energy would the Peliter units need to do this.

Thanks in advance

Woody AKA bob12345678
--------------------------------------------------

You will need a large current supply and a place to transfer the heat to (via heat sink). It is also expensive. Not for 100W amps!
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th June 2002, 03:09 PM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Hong Kong
yes the Eff. rate about 60%
i have thw follow 255.5W peliter and it use 12X34.4=412.8W
255.5W/412.8WX100%=61.9%

Imax(A) 12
Vmax(V) 34.4
Qmax(W) 255.5 Delta T =0 Q=O
Delta Tmax(C) 60
DIMENSIONS(mm) 59X59X3.2
OHM 2.19

Peliter for cooling Cheap Sell!!
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th June 2002, 04:44 PM   #4
tiroth is offline tiroth  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
A Peltier is basically trading efficiency for temperature. You can cool the "cold" side of the peltier to (potentially) below ambient, at a cost of dissipating not only the load heat but also the Peltier dissipation.

Sufficient cooling for the Peltier is critical, as the device will be rapidly destroyed if the temperature differential between the hot and cold side exceeds the specs. Large Peltier devices are usually forced-air or water cooled, as their surface area is so small it is hard to transfer the heat effectively.

You can also run into problems if you get too cold, as condensation will form if you drop below the dewpoint. A lot has been said about this on various PC cooling sites.
  Reply With Quote
Old 24th June 2002, 05:04 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
mrfeedback's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Perth, Australia.
Default From Bad To Worse

Hello Woody ,
Bad thermal/electrical efficiency + bad thermal/electrical efficiency = even bigger power bill !.
Sorry, that is the facts.

Eric.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Peliter for cooling Cheap Sell!! Cephas Swap Meet 1 22nd June 2002 03:36 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 08:47 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2