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Electronic Flue Gas Analyser
Electronic Flue Gas Analyser
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Old 19th January 2017, 03:50 PM   #1
Michael 5of9 is offline Michael 5of9  United Kingdom
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Default Electronic Flue Gas Analyser

A good day to you at DiyAudio; this is out of the ordinary, I have an electronic flue gas analyser, made by Colwick Instruments Ltd (they are no longer around), its called Anagas. The sensor fitted detects CO carbon dioxide only, yet the manufacturer successfully managed to achieve detecting CO carbon dioxide; I am guessing this was achieved by adding a adjustable resistor?

It would be good to know more about how this was achieved, detecting CO.

You can see the components on my Microsoft OneDrive
https://1drv.ms/i/s!AuQDAPiShOjc2Sru5HJEJIdT1oRK

I am in the process of fitting a new battery pack and a new CO sensor.
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Old 19th January 2017, 03:58 PM   #2
kevinkr is offline kevinkr  United States
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Electronic Flue Gas Analyser
I assume you mean carbon monoxide CO which would be a flue gas combustion byproduct? CO2 is carbon dioxide. (Also a combustion byproduct)

I have no idea, and would assume that the sensor was either specially selected or different in some way from what you think it is.

This isn't exactly the right forum for these sorts of questions either.
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Old 19th January 2017, 09:19 PM   #3
Ron E is offline Ron E  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael 5of9 View Post
The sensor fitted detects CO carbon dioxide only, yet the manufacturer successfully managed to achieve detecting CO carbon dioxide
just a guess, probably using math. If there is no co, then it is all co2 and vice versa. Is it only for one fuel or are there settings for particular fuels?
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Old 20th January 2017, 08:47 AM   #4
Michael 5of9 is offline Michael 5of9  United Kingdom
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[QUOTE]
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinkr View Post
I assume you mean carbon monoxide CO which would be a flue gas combustion byproduct? CO2 is carbon dioxide. (Also a combustion byproduct)
Yes; CO carbon monoxide, just testing

Quote:
This isn't exactly the right forum for these sorts of questions either.
Well I have googled searched; made various searches for a forum related to "CO and CO2 test equipment forum" there just doesn't seem to be one and any possible ones were in 2010. If you know of one Kevin; a link to the forum would be helpful,

I use this instrument for setting-up oil burners.
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Last edited by Michael 5of9; 20th January 2017 at 08:50 AM.
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Old 20th January 2017, 09:25 AM   #5
JonSnell Electronic is offline JonSnell Electronic  United Kingdom
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It will be, for a flue, CO sensor. Carbon Monoxide and they have a 5 year life before the sensor no longer works properly.
For your safety, replace it.
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Old 20th January 2017, 10:20 AM   #6
Michael 5of9 is offline Michael 5of9  United Kingdom
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[QUOTE]
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Originally Posted by Ron E View Post
just a guess, probably using math.
Yes; I would say that comes into the equation.

[QUOTE]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron E View Post
If there is no co, then it is all co2 and vice versa.
The selector switch selects either CO or CO2.

[QUOTE]
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Is it only for one fuel or are there settings for particular fuels?
The instrument has a probe which in inserted through a access/test point in the flue to sample the gases of; 28 second kerosene, 35 second gas oil, LPG, natural gas.
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Last edited by Michael 5of9; 20th January 2017 at 10:29 AM.
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Old 20th January 2017, 10:42 AM   #7
Michael 5of9 is offline Michael 5of9  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonSnell Electronic View Post
It will be, for a flue, CO sensor. Carbon Monoxide and they have a 5 year life before the sensor no longer works properly.
For your safety, replace it.
This has drifted off my initial question; "It would be good to know more about how this was achieved, detecting CO".
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Old 20th January 2017, 11:26 AM   #8
Ron E is offline Ron E  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael 5of9 View Post
This has drifted off my initial question; "It would be good to know more about how this was achieved, detecting CO".
Make it easy. For methane:
2x CH4 + 4x O2 = 2x CO2 + 4x H2O under ideal stoichiometric conditions.
Say you have this instead:
2x CH4 + 3.5x O2 = CO2 + CO + 4x H2O
When you don't have enough oxygen, some of that CO2 will become CO instead. So if the detector detects CO, it knows there is less CO2, some sort of logic could be programmed to figure it out. That is what I meant by 'using math'.

More importantly, when you replace a sensor in an obsolete device, how do you calibrate the device? How can you be confident in it?
http://international.go-dove.com/en/...e-Gas-Analyser
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Last edited by Ron E; 20th January 2017 at 11:29 AM.
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Old 20th January 2017, 11:28 AM   #9
JonSnell Electronic is offline JonSnell Electronic  United Kingdom
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Metal oxide semiconductor: When the silica chip's circuitry detects carbon monoxide, it lowers the electrical resistance, and this change triggers the alarm.
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Old 21st January 2017, 02:03 PM   #10
kevinkr is offline kevinkr  United States
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Electronic Flue Gas Analyser
Jon, it's not an alarm, it's a tool for verifying that the fuel mixture ratio is correct for setting up or servicing various types of heating equipment.

If the manufacturer is out of business there is a good argument for replacing the tool with one that is supported. Should someone still offer a calibration service for it that would be a good start for determining whether the instrument is still serviceable.

I can't guess whether or not math is used to determine the % CO2, it seems plausible however.
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