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Old 13th January 2004, 04:42 PM   #1
kinser is offline kinser  Israel
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Default fan

Hi
I have a computer fan that I want to use for my amps heatsink
the prombel:
my power supply output is 30 volts DC, how do I get 12 volts DC for the fan from 30 volts?
thanks kinser
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Old 13th January 2004, 06:46 PM   #2
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A 78 series 1 amp 12V voltage regulator will do the job. Download the data-sheet for specs and application notes.
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Old 13th January 2004, 07:12 PM   #3
joensd is offline joensd  Germany
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As fans increase the efficiency of the heatsink substantially it would be probably enough to supply 6-9V to the fan.
Youīll get much lower noise as well of course and the fan draws less current.
Watch the power dissipation of the 78xx-regulator.
Probably around 2W or so.

If you donīt have a class a amplifier you could also think about a temperature-control for your fan which only kicks in when itīs needed.

Cheers
Jens
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Old 13th January 2004, 07:23 PM   #4
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I used a lm simple switching regulator (I think it is 2596) for my fans. It runs very cool (>90% efficiency) and needs 5 parts (including the regulator itself). Highly recommended.

You can put multiple fans in series (2 or 3 of them in your case) or to use a power resistor if your fan doesn't draw too much current.
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Old 13th January 2004, 10:12 PM   #5
joensd is offline joensd  Germany
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the solution with a switcher would be the most elegant of course
but the main supply will also "see" the switching peaks as well!?
never tried and listened if itīs a substantial noise thatīs created but an amplifier with poor PSRR probably wonīt like it (or better your ears)
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Old 26th April 2004, 06:49 PM   #6
lucpes is offline lucpes  Europe
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Have +/- 63V rails... how can I get 5V for a fan?
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Old 27th April 2004, 10:09 AM   #7
lucpes is offline lucpes  Europe
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Quote:
Originally posted by lucpes
Have +/- 63V rails... how can I get 5V for a fan?
Found the answer: locate an old (mobile phone charger?) 5V gizmo, hack it, and you have your 5VDC source.
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