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Old 12th October 2013, 03:52 AM   #11
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i cant spell can i sorry didnt do a check before posting that.
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Old 12th October 2013, 04:05 AM   #12
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Any time you introduce some resistance into a circuit, you run the risk of overheating. Aluminum has trouble making contacts, and it will oxidize at the joint and create resistance.

Lubricants & Rust Prevention | Lubricants - General Purpose | Gardner Bender Ox-Gardô Anti-Oxidant Compound, 4 Oz - Pkg Qty 23 | B548250 - GlobalIndustrial.com

I put this stuff on speaker wires too.
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Old 12th October 2013, 04:08 AM   #13
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For long runs, and/or extra large gauge, aluminum is undoubtedly much cheaper. And underground or overhead isn't a fire risk.
There may also be some differences with stranded vs. solid aluminum wire, as far as those negative characteristics go with the solid wiring the OP has.
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Old 12th October 2013, 07:08 AM   #14
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Location: West Australia, straight over the road from the beach, natural ambient sounds only.
Aluminium is prone to creep, thus reducing grub screw contact pressure.
This increases contact resistance, causing oxidation, localised heating and the problems that you had (have).
This is an old and well known problem.

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Old 12th October 2013, 08:48 AM   #15
henryve is offline henryve  South Africa
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So you can't claim the rewiring of your home from the home-owner's insurance? I would try that and see what they say, seeing as it can cause a future problem that you don't know about that is hidden. I am sure the insurance company would rather spend the 7 grand to make sure your home wiring is up to current regualations than having to pay out for a burnt down home. Also check your insurance clauses about this, as they might even refuse to pay out if your home burns down, siting that your wiring was not up to current regulations. Insurance these days will look for any excuse to not pay out.
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Old 12th October 2013, 03:23 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by sofaspud View Post
Your wiring is probably grandfathered, but it seems odd to me to have a circuit spread across kitchen, bathroom, and living room (I'm not an electrician). It's a good idea to go around and check things, even adding those 12AWG copper pigtails. Glad to see the damage was confined; it could have been worse.
Well, if you were in the house it would make a little more sense. In the kitchen where the bread maker was plugged in, that circuit ONLY controls the over head light in the kitchen. The small bathroom is right next to it, and the light for the bathroom was on the circuit, with a coat closet between them and the wall to the livingroom. Sense the socket that blew, (just on the other side of the bathroom wall) Im betting they added the sole socket in the livingroom, as that is where their TV and hometheater stuff was plugged in. Obviously it was a "DIY" or rather DIWY, (do it wrong yourself) effort. This why I wanted to warn others here, as we are building some devices which draw a lot of current in a steady fashion.

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Old 12th October 2013, 03:32 PM   #17
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So you can't claim the rewiring of your home from the home-owner's insurance? I would try that and see what they say, seeing as it can cause a future problem that you don't know about that is hidden. I am sure the insurance company would rather spend the 7 grand to make sure your home wiring is up to current regualations than having to pay out for a burnt down home. Also check your insurance clauses about this, as they might even refuse to pay out if your home burns down, siting that your wiring was not up to current regulations. Insurance these days will look for any excuse to not pay out.
I will check that out. Knowing how insurance companies are, (I am a Lawyer) they probably would just drop me! That's even cheaper! (for them) My wiring passes code, it was inspected as it was an FHA loan and they were way picky. there is nothing inherently bad about aluminum wiring, IF YOU FOLLOW CODE PRECISELY. The reason it isnt used anymore, at least until another factor causes copper shortages, is because of how many people, myself included are totally ignorant of the procedures required to do it correctly. There are Zillions of houses wired this way. Those owners, like myself, would be well advised to take precautions to assure everything is correct. It makes for a DIY nightmare and is a fine example of "A little bit of knowledge can be a dangerous thing."

Russellc
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Old 12th October 2013, 03:34 PM   #18
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For long runs, and/or extra large gauge, aluminum is undoubtedly much cheaper. And underground or overhead isn't a fire risk.
There may also be some differences with stranded vs. solid aluminum wire, as far as those negative characteristics go with the solid wiring the OP has.
Correct. You better believe I am going through every socket and switch. I am having my electrician do it, as I want to make sure it is correct.

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Old 12th October 2013, 03:36 PM   #19
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i was taught when i was an electrician apprentance that the allinuim wires crack and cause weak points that have higher resistance thus heat and fire. i was told that the only place legal to use allinuim wire was in free air like a line drop to a weather head.
your house is grandfathered in. however any changes has to be up to NEC standards.
the pigtails will prevent further movement and cracking of the wire.
i wouldnt loose sleep over it but please check your smoke detectors.

now all that said..... explane to me why it is not ok for the craftsmen to use that type of wire but, every underground, overhead service wire i was ever involved in from T.U. (texas utility) was allinium?
from 200A-thousands of amps, like the main service for rigmar mall, in size from #2-650mcm all allinium
Exactly. It just when someone who doesnt know this (like the prior owner) and hooks something up them self...(and I am almost positive this outlet was just added on for their TV setup in that corner) major problems like mine can occur.

Something I just thought of, while much lower draw, I wonder if light sockets need to be "pigtailed" as well? Looks like another project pushing to the head of the line!

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Last edited by Russellc; 12th October 2013 at 03:42 PM.
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Old 12th October 2013, 07:50 PM   #20
henryve is offline henryve  South Africa
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Originally Posted by Russellc View Post
I will check that out. Knowing how insurance companies are, (I am a Lawyer) they probably would just drop me! That's even cheaper! (for them) My wiring passes code, it was inspected as it was an FHA loan and they were way picky. there is nothing inherently bad about aluminum wiring, IF YOU FOLLOW CODE PRECISELY. The reason it isnt used anymore, at least until another factor causes copper shortages, is because of how many people, myself included are totally ignorant of the procedures required to do it correctly. There are Zillions of houses wired this way. Those owners, like myself, would be well advised to take precautions to assure everything is correct. It makes for a DIY nightmare and is a fine example of "A little bit of knowledge can be a dangerous thing."

Russellc
Wow, just as well no homes here that I know of uses Aluminium wiring. Some of our contractors are known for taking shortcuts, and some are just not as qualified as they claim to be.
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