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-   -   Power conditioners, UPS's? my lights dim when the system is up (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/everything-else/242375-power-conditioners-upss-my-lights-dim-when-system-up.html)

Rob B 12th September 2013 12:57 AM

Power conditioners, UPS's? my lights dim when the system is up
 
Hey all, My sytem seems to draw a large amount of power, enough to dim the lights every time the bass hits when its running near full. Anyways, all i have is a surge strip on it rite now which is worthless. Surely this is bad for my amps. I was wondering if a battery backup would sort of act like a capacitor? power conditioners from what I understand just clean up the wave form, but don't provide any extra capacity, so in my mind wouldn't do any good for the situation? I was looking at the APC back ups like what most most any workplace has their computers hooked to, would that be sufficient for 3 fairly hungry amps?

Any help is appreciated, I'm not very knowledgeable when it comes to home electrical.

gmphadte 12th September 2013 05:39 AM

Dipping of voltage happens when the mains wires are not thick enough.

Gajanan Phadte

DF96 12th September 2013 09:56 AM

Buy a generator truck and install it in your yard. Your neighbours won't be able to hear it over the sound of your audio system.

zigzagflux 12th September 2013 10:57 AM

A cheap APC UPS is not likely to make a difference; most of the low end models simply pass the input voltage to the output until their is a severe deviation from nominal. At best (or worst) the UPS will beep and transfer to battery backup every time the bass hits. You don't want that.

It is common (and shame on lazy electricians for doing this) for the lighting circuit to share the same branch conductors with the receptacles. So turning on the vacuum cleaner dims the lights for that circuit. Do the lights in the entire house dim or just the ones in that room? It is not likely you have a problem at the panel, just on that branch circuit.

FoMoCo 12th September 2013 11:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zigzagflux (Post 3629128)
It is common (and shame on lazy electricians for doing this) for the lighting circuit to share the same branch conductors with the receptacles.

This is indeed common, but not lazy.

It used to be that lighting was on a circuit of its own. One circuit for the entire home. Now imagine what happens if you lose that circuit. Bam! No lights, anywhere. I suppose one could run two circuits to each room, and pay accordingly for it, but sharing lighting and receptacles makes the most sense from a safety, and cost, point of view.

To call it lazy is immature and short-sighted.

FoMoCo 12th September 2013 11:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rob B (Post 3628740)
...

Your best bet is to have a qualified electrician install a separate circuit to power your system. Not a cheap fix, but if you can afford enough power to dim the lights...

Rob B 12th September 2013 04:22 PM

Its every light in the house, very much the same as when the a/c unit kicks on. I know most appliences have a capacitor, no one makes a universal 120v cap? Its a rental house, new wiring is out of the question.

DF96 12th September 2013 05:53 PM

I think you need more than a capacitor.

FoMoCo 12th September 2013 06:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DF96 (Post 3629616)
I think you need more than a capacitor.

+1 There isn't any easy fix to this.

Frank Berry 12th September 2013 07:04 PM

There may be a loose electrical connection somewhere in your building. Please advise your landlord of this problem. It could be dangerous!


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