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Old 22nd June 2013, 07:27 AM   #11
RJM1 is offline RJM1  United States
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Pano, I think you might have NTFS confused with Fat 32 which has the 4Gb file limit (2^32). here are some large hard drive backups on my 32 bit XP-Sp3 machine, NTFS.

http://www.ntfs.com/ntfs_vs_fat.htm
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Old 22nd June 2013, 07:48 AM   #12
hpeter is offline hpeter  Europe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pano View Post
I buy big external HDs by the score and reformat them to what ever is needed to hold HD video files. NTFS does have a 4GB file size limit, which we sometimes run up against with HD video. Mac format does not, nor does UDF, as far as I know. I use all three formats on WD, Seagate, G-Drives and others, no problem. Win XP does not natively read UDF.

I usually just make the drive 1 big partition. So far, so good.
no that´s fat32

with ntfs, you can have >2tb partition ; but if you want to boot from it you´ll have to use GUID instaed of MBR with guid you will have solve different problems
i guess nobody will boot from such huge partitions
even less if it´s usb2,0 disk


Quote:
NTFS - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Max. volume size
264 clusters − 1 cluster (format);
256 TB (256 × 10244 bytes) − 64 KB (64 × 1024 bytes) (implementation)[3]

Max. file size
16 EiB – 1 KiB (format);
16 TiB – 64 KiB (Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 or earlier implementation)[3]
256 TiB – 64 KiB (Windows 8, Windows Server 2012 implementation)[4]
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Old 23rd June 2013, 05:23 PM   #13
Pano is offline Pano  United States
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Right - duh! I just had a big FAT32 brain fart.
Guess I was thinkin' NTFS cause Mac doesn't format it natively. Read, but not write. I got a utility to do that. Of course NTFS has no problems with files over 4GB.

Thanks for correcting me on that.
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Old 24th June 2013, 05:21 PM   #14
hpeter is offline hpeter  Europe
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no problem, glad it helped

i am no fan of huge boot partitions, i think tough fragmentation problems gonna get you
always install big, file changing programs on other drives
having fragmented c: will seriously hurt performance; not alway can be 100% fixed by defrag
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Old 25th June 2013, 03:46 AM   #15
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I basically wanted a clarification that if I partitioned the drive no essential factory loaded files would be lost and cause some problems. Also wanted to know if any other software is required.

From what you are all saying it doesn't appear to be so. So I plugged it to my Win7 computer and used Disk Management and partitioned the drive into 200MB sections. File format is of course NTFS .

Just backed up the files from the Win7 computer and some from the XP-SP2 computer.

Thanks everybody .
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Old 25th June 2013, 04:18 AM   #16
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It's a 2 TB drive and I want to partition it........into 200MB partitions? I guess you have your reasons but such small partitions will end up causing wasted space.
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Old 25th June 2013, 03:22 PM   #17
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I'm no computer expert ! Basically I wanted to back up all my other older hard drives which are only 160 Mb. So I figured that I could keep each partition for a different drive ! Maybe very silly doing it this way, but what is the better way to do it ?
Cheers.
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Old 25th June 2013, 03:35 PM   #18
kevinkr is offline kevinkr  United States
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Do you mean 160GB drives? 160MB drives are tiny and haven't been made since long before Windows XP arrived on the scene... I thought you originally said you were making 200GB partitions on your 2TB drive?
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Old 25th June 2013, 09:51 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ashok View Post
I wanted to back up all my other older hard drlves which are only 160 Mb. So I figured that I could keep each partition for a different drive ! what is the better way to do it ?
Cheers.
Two ways

1. Create folders on the backup drive [ie d, e, f, g, h...] and copy all the contents of the source drive to its own folder

2. Use a compression utility [winrar, winzip, 7-zip, IZArc, etc] to create a compressed file for each source drive on the backup drive
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Old 26th June 2013, 01:10 AM   #20
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KMossman: Thanks for the advice. I actually did that but didn't use any compression. I guess I should be doing that too.

Kevin: Yes that should have been 160GB !.....I'm slipping up.....aging gray cells I guess ?
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