brushed aluminum finish, how to? - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > General Interest > Everything Else

Everything Else Anything related to audio / video / electronics etc) BUT remember- we have many new forums where your thread may now fit! .... Parts, Equipment & Tools, Construction Tips, Software Tools......

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 25th November 2003, 06:55 AM   #1
power is offline power  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Ontario
Default brushed aluminum finish, how to?

We'll see if this post works. I have timesaved aluminum parts before but the results do vary with some parts having flaws such as slight rolling of the edges, etc. What other methods are there to "grain" the parts with the same if not better results. There must be a way
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2003, 07:42 AM   #2
diyAudio Member
 
Sch3mat1c's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Send a message via ICQ to Sch3mat1c Send a message via AIM to Sch3mat1c
I think it's done with a belt sander.

Tim
__________________
Seven Transistor Labs
Projects and Resources
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2003, 08:14 AM   #3
diyAudio Member
 
Pbassred's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: N London
Send a message via MSN to Pbassred
I once did a "machined" finish (circles) using a 1" wire brush atachment with an electric drill. You need to watch it on brass because it tarnishes so quickly. You could get the brushed finish with the edge of a wire brush disk.
__________________
Jeeees! I only asked
https://www.facebook.com/dave.potter.5815
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2003, 12:27 PM   #4
Coulomb is offline Coulomb  England
diyAudio Member
 
Coulomb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Ancaster, Ontario
You could use a belt sander but if you wander at all it ruins the effect. I found if you make a jig with some 1x1 screwed to a panel of 3/4" board that traps your sanding block from wandering left or right, you can then pass the sand paper back an forth over your face plate to get the nice finish.

Anthony
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2003, 01:21 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
Peter Daniel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Toronto, Canada
Send a message via AIM to Peter Daniel
I'm using 6" belt sander with 100 or 120 grid belts. Depending on the tension on a belt you will get more or less of the rolling of the edges. To wet the surface I'm using Varsol (or paint thinner) with very good results.

If you really want to avoid rolling of edges, the best approach would be making part longer and after sanding, trimming it off.

It's hard to get perfectly uniform finish on a belt, so after that I'm using Sotch Brite pads to further smooth the surface. Depending how long you do that, the finish can become really nice and pro looking.

Recently I started using Alodine at home and I'm getting fast and satisfying results, without having to wait 2 weeks for anodizing house to finish my panels.

I recently acquired Mark Levinson top cover door from their top of the line CD transport, and to my surprise their sanding job (done on a belt) was inferior to mine
Attached Images
File Type: jpg br.jpg (62.1 KB, 1304 views)
__________________
www.audiosector.com
“Do something really well. See how much time it takes. It might be a product, a work of art, who knows? Then give it away cheaply, just because you feel that it should not cost so much, even if it took a lot of time and expensive materials to make it.” - JC
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2003, 07:09 PM   #6
power is offline power  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Ontario
the problem i see by doing the sanding manually with a belt sander is that if your workpiece is wider than the belt it would be difficult no to leave steps. Scotch brite may take it out but if you are doing several parts consistancy comes into play.

I have seen another process where acid is used to create the brushed finish. Very professional but also very expensive.

Beautiful looking work Peter!
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2003, 07:09 PM   #7
BrianGT is offline BrianGT  United States
diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
 
BrianGT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: near Atlanta, GA
Send a message via AIM to BrianGT
I recently found that using a random orbit palm sander, with 80, 100, then 220 grit paper works great for taking out scratches in aluminum panels, then using a kitchen type brillo pad works great to give it that brushed look. I like using the kind with the sponge attached, as it allows for a more uniform pressure on the metal. The brillo pad easily takes up the scratches left from the 220 grit paper on the sander. I got the advice on the brillo pads from the machine shop guy here at school. That is what they use before anodizing aluminum panels. Before I used synthetic steel wool, but had problems with a non-uniform finish.

--
Brian
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2003, 07:36 PM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
purplepeople's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Try dragging a coarse hand-file sideways in the direction of the brushing. Takes more time than power tools, but you have much more control. I like to use a palm sander to get most of the surface, then drag my file to finish the "brushed" effect. A sanding block can work, but the softness of the block can really make for uneven corner radii.

:)ensen.
__________________
Those who claim to be making history are often the same ones repeating it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2003, 08:11 PM   #9
diyAudio Member
 
Peter Daniel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Toronto, Canada
Send a message via AIM to Peter Daniel
You can make a block out of soft wood, like cedar.

I use belt sander as it is faster and deep scratches are easily removed. But I've herd from some memvers that using coarse scotch brite type pads works very well too.

Professional finishers use this type of wheel and as far as I know it's done manually. This leaves short lines (different than from belt sander).

We had Amp-1 finished this way, but I still wasn't much satisfied with the quality of a job. After first inspection 30% had to be redone.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg san.jpg (27.5 KB, 1145 views)
__________________
www.audiosector.com
“Do something really well. See how much time it takes. It might be a product, a work of art, who knows? Then give it away cheaply, just because you feel that it should not cost so much, even if it took a lot of time and expensive materials to make it.” - JC
  Reply With Quote
Old 25th November 2003, 08:21 PM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Plano , TX
Send a message via AIM to jewilson
Default If youy don't have the tools

You can check you one of your local machine shops. The have large belt and drumb sanders, up to 36" wide. Just tell them you want a brushed finish using either 120 or 150 grit. Besure to tell them which way you want the grain runing.
__________________
Jim W.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
something to finish mdf paulfk Multi-Way 14 14th March 2009 02:04 PM
To paint brushed aluminum Duo Everything Else 23 9th October 2007 04:22 AM
Mark Kelly DC Brushed Motor Controller circuit pjpoes Analogue Source 2 1st February 2007 10:05 AM
How to finish brushed aluminium? bm_mode Everything Else 3 21st September 2002 01:55 PM
Brushed aluminium Vivek Everything Else 4 18th July 2002 06:20 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 09:44 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2