What is the difference between a solid state hard drive and a regular hard drive? - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > General Interest > Everything Else

Everything Else Anything related to audio / video / electronics etc) BUT remember- we have many new forums where your thread may now fit! .... Parts, Equipment & Tools, Construction Tips, Software Tools......

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 18th February 2013, 05:51 AM   #1
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Default What is the difference between a solid state hard drive and a regular hard drive?

Solid state costs much more for less memory and i was wondering why.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2013, 06:39 AM   #2
Mooly is offline Mooly  United Kingdom
diyAudio Moderator
 
Mooly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
I think the answer is that the technology is new(er), that it hasn't reached the same market penetration and so demand is lower and costs higher. The price is coming down all the time. Hard drives used to cost hundreds of pounds for only a few hundred mbs not that many years ago.
__________________
-------------------------------------------------------
A simulation free zone. Design it, build it, test it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2013, 06:49 AM   #3
tinitus is offline tinitus  Europe
diyAudio Moderator R.I.P.
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebastianebilly View Post
... i was wondering why.
patents ?
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2013, 08:01 AM   #4
frugal-phile(tm)
diyAudio Moderator
 
planet10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Victoria, BC, NA, Sol III
Blog Entries: 5
A solid state drive is not really a hard drive, it is only rewritable silicon memory (flash RAM) used for the same purpose as a hard drive.

A hard drive is a mechanical device with spinning platters & read heads. It has been continuously developed for many, many decades. When it was first introduced in the late 50s a ~4 MB disk (size of a big side-by-side refrigerator) cost about $60k.

The 1st commercial flash memory was released in the late 80s, and it has only recently become cheap enuff to think about using in personal computers. It is much faster than HDs (but note that reads are much faster than writes), and when packaged into a substitute for an HD their full potential is not realized. Directly accessing the flash by installing it on the motherboard gets more out of it.

The SSD uses less power, and is much more immune to physical impact (a good analogy is that the distance od an HDs heads over the platter is akin to a 747 cruising inches off the ground)

dave
__________________
community sites t-linespeakers.org, frugal-horn.com, frugal-phile.com ........ commercial site planet10-HiFi
p10-hifi forum here at diyA
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2013, 11:46 AM   #5
Pano is offline Pano  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
Pano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Milliways
Blog Entries: 4
Ditto what Dave says. I own about 20 SSD and use them for HD video recording in the field.
They are very fast, very rugged and rather expensive.

If you are looking for a performance boost in you computer, make your primary drive (with the OS and essential programs) an SSD. Boot time will be much improved and general responsiveness will be much better. Cost per Gigabyte is the main disadvantage.
__________________
Take the Speaker Voltage Test!
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2013, 12:36 PM   #6
diyAudio Member
 
theAnonymous1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Anonymityville
My favorite quality of SSD.... quiet!

The sound and vibration of mechanical hard drives has always bothered me to the point of having to turn my PC off on days when my agitation level was high. All is silent now, and the world is good again.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2013, 12:38 PM   #7
jrenkin is offline jrenkin  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Denver, Colorado
Many, if not most, new small laptops or net books use SSD now, like my MacBook Air. Additionally, this type of memory is ubiquitous on smart phones, tablets and so on. Small and fast, but expensive to hit the volume of memory available on a regular HD.
For music, I think a regular hard drive is adequate if directly attached to the playing computer. If it is over wifi, like i do, it works as long as you have a player that buffers or loads into memory. The buffer is needed if you want to do anything else memory intensive on the computer while playing music too. A SSD does not seem to have the same access problems.
I find that SSDs are also excellent for any program that references the hard drive a lot. I use a medical version of "Dragon Naturally Speaking" dictation software, and performance speed is much, much better with a SSD. Highly recommended. It has to do with the speed of data access and searching through a massive library and speech database.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2013, 12:41 PM   #8
jrenkin is offline jrenkin  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Denver, Colorado
Quote:
Originally Posted by theAnonymous1 View Post
My favorite quality of SSD.... quiet!

The sound and vibration of mechanical hard drives has always bothered me to the point of having to turn my PC off on days when my agitation level was high. All is silent now, and the world is good again.
Oh, yes. That too. There is a whole thread on "quiet" computers to use as music servers. SSD are quite and generate much less heat. With a MacBook Air as the player, and a music library on a hard disk over wifi in a another room, my listening environment is much better.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2013, 01:01 PM   #9
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Randers, Denmark
Traditional hard drives can be very quite. I have tried to build a quiet PC' I used low current mother board, and fan speed control. Replaced small fans with large quite fans, and a hard drive from samsung known to be quite. I had it in the living room - but in a closet and it's was inaudibel. Outside it was just audible with the ears very close. I didn't use any special hard drive suspension or boxes. If I had, the noise would have been even lower.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th February 2013, 07:18 PM   #10
frugal-phile(tm)
diyAudio Moderator
 
planet10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Victoria, BC, NA, Sol III
Blog Entries: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrenkin View Post
new small laptops or net books use SSD now, like my MacBook Air.
It should be noted that the MacBooks (Air or Pro) do not use SSD in the typical sense. The Flash is soldered to the motherboard and directly accessed unlike a typical SSD which emulates a SATA disk drive. This is why one cannot upgrade the quantity.

dave
__________________
community sites t-linespeakers.org, frugal-horn.com, frugal-phile.com ........ commercial site planet10-HiFi
p10-hifi forum here at diyA
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Audiophile hard drive jamesfeline PC Based 34 14th November 2011 01:42 PM
SSD vs Hard Drive smithy666 Digital Source 36 22nd August 2008 05:28 PM
Hard Drive problem lawbadman Everything Else 20 24th July 2007 01:42 AM
Dead hard drive Dennis Hui The Lounge 2 28th August 2004 08:03 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 07:25 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2