Drums in super slow motion - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > General Interest > Everything Else

Everything Else Anything related to audio / video / electronics etc) BUT remember- we have many new forums where your thread may now fit! .... Parts, Equipment & Tools, Construction Tips, Software Tools......

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 5th February 2013, 03:19 AM   #1
Pano is offline Pano  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
Pano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Milliways
Blog Entries: 4
Thumbs up Drums in super slow motion

See what makes the sound. Amazing stuff.
Snare & Cymbal in Super Slow Motion - YouTube
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th February 2013, 03:36 AM   #2
gootee is offline gootee  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Indiana
Blog Entries: 1
Wow!

The cymbal is especially surprising!

Thanks for posting that link!
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th February 2013, 03:38 AM   #3
Pano is offline Pano  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
Pano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Milliways
Blog Entries: 4
Crazy, isn't it? Who knew that cymbals are made of rubber?
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th February 2013, 05:09 AM   #4
diyAudio Member
 
dchisholm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: St Louis, Mo
Quote:
Originally Posted by gootee View Post
The cymbal is especially surprising!
Definitely! It's hard to believe the deflection wasn't artificially enhanced to aid visualization of the waveform.

Dale
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th February 2013, 01:25 PM   #5
diyAudio Member
 
tubelab.com's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: West Virginia panhandle
Quote:
It's hard to believe the deflection wasn't artificially enhanced to aid visualization of the waveform.
I have seen other slow motion films that show similar deflection. When a cymbal that is properly played finally fails it will uaually break along the concentric circles visible on its surface from the manufacturing process. If you end up with a hole in the cymbal, you are hitting it hard with the end of the stick.

I have seen a slow motion film of a guitar (maybe it was a bass guitar) string being plucked with a pick. The camera was looking down the neck from above the bridge. You can see the initial deflection move down the string to the nut, and then be reflected back toward the bridge. The process repeats, and after a few cycles the second harmonic is clearly visible as a double deflection along the string.

The slow motion demos I saw were captured on FILM and shown to us by a high speed camera manufacturer during a demo presentation to our company. The guitar and cymbal shots were to educate manufacturing engineers about harmonic motion. The presentation was all about unintended deflection and the peak deflection generated by the sum of the fundamental and harmonics along a PC board during high speed SMD pick and place operation.

There are Youtube videos of guitars and basses being plucked, but none seems to show the harmonics like the demo did 20+ years ago.
__________________
Too much power is almost enough! Turn it up till it explodes - then back up just a little.
  Reply With Quote
Old 5th February 2013, 04:41 PM   #6
Mooly is online now Mooly  United Kingdom
diyAudio Moderator
 
Mooly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
That's incredible, I had no idea it deformed like that when struck. And we expect our speakers to reproduce that wavefront
__________________
-------------------------------------------------------
Installing and using LTspice. From beginner to advanced.
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th February 2013, 04:20 AM   #7
gootee is offline gootee  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Indiana
Blog Entries: 1
Maybe they have some super-slo-mo of speakers?!
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th February 2013, 01:08 AM   #8
Pano is offline Pano  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
Pano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Milliways
Blog Entries: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooly View Post
And we expect our speakers to reproduce that wavefront
No kidding! A few years back I attended an audio show in Washington, DC. That evening there was a jazz concert in a room where just 2 hours before I had listened to Hi-Fi. The difference was not subtle. That's when I realized that a ride cymbal is a 19" tweeter.
__________________
Take the Speaker Voltage Test!
  Reply With Quote
Old 15th February 2013, 03:26 AM   #9
Pano is offline Pano  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
Pano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Milliways
Blog Entries: 4
I think this is the origin of the video above. Lots of cool stuff here.
Music in slow motion - Guitar, Bass, Drum Kit, Piano and Violin - YouTube
  Reply With Quote
Old 15th February 2013, 01:25 PM   #10
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Birmingham, UK
I can see why you are not supposed to hit cymbals square on but rather with a glancing blow.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Electronic drums using PC Dikemou Instruments and Amps 9 30th June 2009 01:35 PM
What makes drums sound like drums? Bing Yang Multi-Way 78 25th April 2006 09:48 AM
Electronic drums Optical Instruments and Amps 15 28th January 2005 02:48 PM
Electronic drums admir Instruments and Amps 3 30th November 2004 02:04 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 07:17 AM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2