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Old 26th April 2012, 03:07 PM   #1
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Default High-voltage dc current linear amp schematics

Hi everybody, I'm new on this forum so i think it's right place to post - can someone help me with schematics on dc amp, i have dc signal, range 0-5V, i need to proportionally strengthen it to the range of 0-200V/5A into resistive load. I found much schematics on the internet, but they are useless for my application without any step-by-step calculations.
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Old 26th April 2012, 03:38 PM   #2
godfrey is offline godfrey  South Africa
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So maximum output power is 200V * 5A = 1000W? That sounds like a job for SMPS. Is it for heating or motor control or what?
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Old 26th April 2012, 06:25 PM   #3
Elvee is offline Elvee  Belgium
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Does it need to be four-quadrant amplifier-like, or is one quadrant sufficient as in linear supplies?
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Old 26th April 2012, 08:46 PM   #4
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Yes, 1000W. This is for studying various high-power BJT and MOSFET transistors. Sorry for my English, i don't quite understand what's the difference between four-quadrant and one quadrant, and what it is. Thanks.
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Old 26th April 2012, 09:14 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orland90 View Post
Yes, 1000W. This is for studying various high-power BJT and MOSFET transistors. Sorry for my English, i don't quite understand what's the difference between four-quadrant and one quadrant, and what it is. Thanks.
If you plot a graph of output voltage and currents, 4 quadrants will cover all possibilities of +/- output voltage and +/- output current.

A "simple" eg bench psu may only cover simple resistive loads. An amplifier driving a reactive (C and or L) load may need to SINK current when the output is positive.

you need also to consider dynamic effects: Step change in load, what happens? Accuracy? Rated for DC long term or just quick test pulses?

Please describe in detail all the conditions required! Then we can help!

EDIT: I read for studying power transistors! DC does not apply here as DUTs will vaporise at 1KW. Power devices are normally tested using short (300uS) pulses with a 1% duty cyle. so your problem is one of pulse speed and accuracy, not grunt watts.

Last edited by cliffforrest; 26th April 2012 at 09:17 PM.
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Old 27th April 2012, 07:00 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by cliffforrest View Post
If you plot a graph of output voltage and currents, 4 quadrants will cover all possibilities of +/- output voltage and +/- output current.

A "simple" eg bench psu may only cover simple resistive loads. An amplifier driving a reactive (C and or L) load may need to SINK current when the output is positive.

you need also to consider dynamic effects: Step change in load, what happens? Accuracy? Rated for DC long term or just quick test pulses?

Please describe in detail all the conditions required! Then we can help!

EDIT: I read for studying power transistors! DC does not apply here as DUTs will vaporise at 1KW. Power devices are normally tested using short (300uS) pulses with a 1% duty cyle. so your problem is one of pulse speed and accuracy, not grunt watts.
What is DUT ? Yes, 1KW is a pretty much, i thought heatsinks and coupled transistors with isolation between signal and power paths will help. but i can't figure it out then, how i can translate DC linear signal into 0-200V of pulse signal, is it some kind of switching power supply ? And does it need some controller do drive ? I looked to the existing IC' chips, and those what i find across the internet was not for high-voltage applications.
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Old 27th April 2012, 10:15 AM   #7
Enzo is offline Enzo  United States
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DUT - Device Under Test.
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