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Old 24th April 2012, 06:54 PM   #1
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Default What does "Timber Accuracy" mean?

any idea? what does it mean to you when you read "the timbre accuracy of the amplifier is good" ... I know what does it mean but I want others ideas and definitions...
any input devastatingly appreciated

Last edited by ARIYAHOOR; 24th April 2012 at 07:12 PM.
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Old 24th April 2012, 07:01 PM   #2
SY is offline SY  United States
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It means the sound is rather wooden.

"Tinbre accuracy" in the context of an amplifier means that the reviewer needed to sell an article.
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Old 24th April 2012, 07:02 PM   #3
M Gregg is offline M Gregg  United Kingdom
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It means that the frequency response of the amplifier is correct and accurate.

Put another way instruments sound like the real thing, birds sound like birds singing and a player of a piano can tell if its a grand piano..the acoustics sound like the room they were recorded in..not distorted so they sound like something close to the real thing..

Fun link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timbre

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Old 24th April 2012, 07:05 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SY View Post
It means the sound is rather wooden.

"Tinbre accuracy" in the context of an amplifier means that the reviewer needed to sell an article.
that's a moot point... thanks anyway... but let's put business away... what brings to you in your inner sanctum (Hi-Fob market aside) when you hear "Timber Accuracy" about an amplifier?
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Old 24th April 2012, 07:08 PM   #5
SY is offline SY  United States
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I haven't seen an amplifier (except a tiny minority of bizarrely priced fetish pieces) with other than a flat frequency response since maybe 1975. The "timbre accuracy" (there is a big difference between timber and timbre!) thing is purely hifi magazine nonsense.
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Old 24th April 2012, 07:09 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M Gregg View Post
It means that the frequency response of the amplifier is correct and accurate.

Put another way instruments sound like the real thing, birds sound like birds singing and a player of a piano can tell if its a grand piano..the acoustics sound like the room they were recorded in..not distorted so they sound like something close to the real thing..

Fun link:

Timbre - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Regards
M. Gregg
that's what I'm looking for... to me Timber Accuracy means that amplifier is so accurate (efficient?) and the rise time and settle time and frequency range is as it would be in Hi-Fi... it mean amplifier is as much accurate as audiophile (or speaker or even whole system) demands... something like this
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Old 24th April 2012, 07:11 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SY View Post
I haven't seen an amplifier (except a tiny minority of bizarrely priced fetish pieces) with other than a flat frequency response since maybe 1975. The "timbre accuracy" (there is a big difference between timber and timbre!) thing is purely hifi magazine nonsense.
I meant Timbre... excuse my mistake
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Old 24th April 2012, 07:13 PM   #8
M Gregg is offline M Gregg  United Kingdom
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The problem with this is frequency response of the measured amplifier and
perceived accuracy "timbre" are not the same...It requires a wide frequency range and the match between the equipment to create it.
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Old 24th April 2012, 07:15 PM   #9
cbdb is offline cbdb  Canada
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Quote:
It means the sound is rather wooden.
HA HA HA! (get it, timber)

Probably not what the reviewer meant, but I believe its a lack of harmonic distortion (and to some degree intermod distortion). From wikipedia "In simple terms, timbre is what makes a particular musical sound different from another, even when they have the same pitch and loudness." (A flute playing middle A compared to a trumpet). Which is all in the harmonics. Change the harmonics balance you change the timbre. Any good amp (less than) .05% thd will be timbre accurate. Maybe even less considering the large timbre changes in the same instrument from playing styles, and movement. (blow a flute hard it puts out a huge amount more harmonics, same when a trombone points right at you. So that the reviewer knows what is accurate is rubish.

Last edited by cbdb; 24th April 2012 at 07:21 PM.
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Old 24th April 2012, 07:19 PM   #10
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HA HA HA! (get it, timber)

Probably not what the reviewer meant, but I believe its a lack of harmonic distortion (and to some degree intermod distortion). From wikipedia "In simple terms, timbre is what makes a particular musical sound different from another, even when they have the same pitch and loudness." Which is all in the harmonics. Change the harmonics balance you change the timbre. Any good amp (less than) .05% thd will be timbre accurate.
so any amplifier with THD less than 0.05% is timbre accurate? does it have something to do with "Rise Time"and "settle time" of amplifier?
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