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Old 17th June 2010, 07:57 PM   #11
lgreen is offline lgreen  United States
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Default Ikea Rack

I needed more room for all my diy amplifiers. I've got 2 racks off to the side for source equipment and needed a big one for holding the amps between the speakers.

Here is a LINK to the project.

Here is a pic of the Ikea rack with cast iron pipes to help it support more weight.

Click the image to open in full size.

I bought a cheapo used Ikea rack for about $40, added threaded rods, pipes and more wheels, and the result is kind of a crappy rack but one that can support many hundreds of pounds of amplifiers without bending. Looks good too.
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Old 17th June 2010, 08:05 PM   #12
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Indeed yes, multiple discs that are so called "slipped" or in the doctors terms - prolapsed Like Pringles unfortunately, it's something that won't go away... Once you pop, you can't stop

Sub 100Hz there isn't a lot that's really much good. I was hoping the glass doors may help in that situation, well at least they'll certainly prevent some vibration energy from getting to the equipment. Not all though as you can understand

Perhaps a solid steel safe would help, not in the cooling department though
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Old 22nd June 2010, 08:15 AM   #13
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I was wondering if there was a thread like this! I figured that with all the DIYers around here that we weren't all just building electronic stuff.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lgreen View Post
Here is a pic of the Ikea rack with cast iron pipes to help it support more weight.
Speaking of cast iron pipes, I've taken quite a liking to building various pieces of furniture using steel pipes. In combination with floor flanges, they are incredibly strong. I've built speaker stands, a coffee table, and a CD/DVD/BD rack using those pipes.

Now I just recently completed my equipment rack. I've been meaning to build it for several years. It's very sturdy and weighs 65 pounds!

Materials:
  • (6) 24" x 16" x 23/32" Sandply shelves
  • (20) 3/4" x 6" black steel pipes
  • (40) 3/4" floor flanges
  • (144) 1/4"-20 x 3/4" black, flat-head, socket-drive machine screws
  • (144) 1/4"-20 long-neck, six-prong T-nuts
  • (16) #12 x 3/4" flat-head wood screws
  • (4) 3/8"-16 x 2" carriage bolts
  • (4) 3/8"-16 T-nuts
  • (2) 1/4" x 2.5" lag screws
  • 1/2" steel electrical conduit and angle fittings
  • (1) 5mm white LED
  • (1) 4.5 VDC wall-wart from an old CD Walkman
  • (2 coats) red oak stain
  • (2 coats) satin polyurethane

This is the first time I had attempted to do a wood finish like this. It turned out pretty well. There are a bunch of tiny air bubbles in the poly finish, but overall it's pretty smooth.

The feet are 3/8"-16 carriage bolts. They are adjustable so that I can make the plinth of my turntable balanced. They screw into the bottom shelf via T-nuts and lock in place with hex nuts.

The 1/2" electrical conduit serves as an adjustable mounting for the white LED that illuminates the turntable. The conduit fits down inside the steel pipes. Both height and rotation are adjustable. Two 1/4" lag screws hold the conduit in place. The wire to the LED emerges inconspicuously out of the bottom shelf.

It was quite an adventure getting all 144 T-nuts in place. I could have had the screws go directly from one flange to the other, but I decided to screw directly into the wood instead. Wood screws probably wouldn't have been strong enough so I used machine screws and T-nuts. The holes for the T-nuts were sunk into the wood a little using a 3/4" Forstner bit. I used a hex bolt and a couple of flat washers to pull the T-nuts into the wood. Needless to say that by the time I got all of the T-nuts in, the head of the hex bolt was stripped and the washers were thoroughly flattened!

In case anyone is wondering, here's the equipment on the rack in the first picture (from top to bottom):
  • Pro-ject 2.9 Wood with Shure V15vxmr
  • a hybrid tube/solid-state phono preamp that I've been working on for years
  • Oppo BDP-83SE
  • Crown Straight Line One (being used as a source selector for front left/right channels
  • a cheap JVC VHS VCR (being used as a clock)
  • Fisher 250 receiver (one channel being used to drive a sub)
  • off to the right:
    • Panasonic Viera 37LZ800 1080p LCD TV
    • (2) Otari MX5050BII-2 tape decks (being use as a stand for the TV)
  • off to the left:
    • NHT SuperOne (1 of 5)
    • on shelf below NHT: a 5.1 surround preamp on a breadboard (an impressive mess of wires). This will eventually be a 7.1 analog (digitally-controlled) preamp. Lots and lots of relays will be involved.
  • just out of frame:
    • (3) LM3886 monoblock amps for the front channels
    • a stereo LM1875 amp for the rear channels

I suppose I'll make some posts of my other furniture creations too. I just need some better pics (my digital camera is old and pitiful in low-light situations).
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Last edited by MrTransistorm; 22nd June 2010 at 08:43 AM.
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Old 22nd June 2010, 09:14 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by event horizon View Post
Indeed yes, multiple discs that are so called "slipped" or in the doctors terms - prolapsed Like Pringles unfortunately, it's something that won't go away... Once you pop, you can't stop

I had serious disk problems for years - the result of skiing injuries and silly dead lifts. A good chiropractor (20 years ago) and regular stretching routines allow me to do all kinds of silly things with practically no complains from the disks today. Maybe i'm just lucky.


Quote:
Originally Posted by event horizon View Post
Sub 100Hz there isn't a lot that's really much good. I was hoping the glass doors may help in that situation, well at least they'll certainly prevent some vibration energy from getting to the equipment. Not all though as you can understand

Perhaps a solid steel safe would help, not in the cooling department though

Glass is a horrible material for insulation and support. It may be usable only if the shelfs are very well decoupled from the rack. Neither does excessive mass help much - it just lowers resonance and makes it even more difficult to control.

About the only (sensible) way to achieve isolation over a wide range of frequencies is to use some lossy coupling. I have had good results using almost deflated inner tubes between layers of slate and wood and excellent results by following the recipe from Symposium's patent - a sandwich of layers of increasing compliance towards the center. The mid layer is closed cell polyethylene foam. To fine tune the sound i use either diy rollerblocks or myrtle wood blocks ( Cardas idea) under the individual components.
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Old 22nd June 2010, 10:32 AM   #15
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I like these Network server equipment racks. You need 1 set to complete a rack. You can check on ebay I think or google. All aluminum. I use aluminum angle brackets to connect the shelves onto the racks. The nice thing is that it is extremely flexible when choosing hight between racks...and you can even angle your shelves anyway you want (see pic). The screws/bolts/nuts needed come with the racks.
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Old 21st April 2012, 11:13 PM   #16
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Default MrAcoustat finished rack

Here are a few pictures of my DIY rack had a few on page 1 but they are now gone it would be better if whe could edit our posts but this is not the case.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 27th April 2012, 08:06 AM   #17
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DIYed 16mm high-glass MDF infinitely adjustable... love them!

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up close view:
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complete view:
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Old 27th April 2012, 09:46 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by event horizon View Post
Not only does my equipment stay cleaner for longer, it also sounds better due to less vibration

That's it for now, just thought i'd share a bit...

How does vibration enter an electrical signal, excluding the turntable cartridge that is?
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Old 27th April 2012, 09:53 AM   #19
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Microphonics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 27th April 2012, 09:57 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry365 View Post
How does vibration enter an electrical signal, excluding the turntable cartridge that is?
I don't think vibration will affect sound signal in a conductor ... vibration will come into consideration when talking about a turntable or microphonics of tubes... correct me if I'm mistaken
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