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Old 10th September 2002, 05:44 PM   #1
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Default The importance of proper setup and vibrations control

I recently finished my CD-PRO transport and replaced with it my previous transport. In the beginning I didn't like the sound, because although very detailed, it had a sonic signature I was not used to and sounded very fatigueing. I changed some supporting platforms under the CD-Pro and introduced more damping (sandwiching damping material between 1/4" aluminum and MDF over sand) and it brought improvement. But still, the sound wasn't to my likening. I changed the AC cord on a player, but to my surprise it didn't do much.

So eventually I figured I did everything I could with tweaking the transport and tried my efforts with DAC. Originally it was resting on 3 spikes and that setup worked well with previous transport. I removed the spikes and sound changed dramatically into opposite direction (less forward, very laid back). So I concluded I needed something in between. My current setup is as per pic, with just one spike supporting the front. It maid so much improvement combined with CD-PRO that it beats everything I've heard before in my system. There is so much more detail (I am truly hearing things on recordings I wasn't aware of before), the sound is much more involving and music sounds like music and not mechanical reproduction with each instrument existing in its own space.

Incidentaly, when I tried to place two spikes on ea. end at the front, the sound changes and is very flat and not desirable.

So my conclusion is, that the proper setup and mechanical interaction between equipment and supporting structure is as much important as circuits and parts implemented themselves. Try it and you might be surprised.
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Old 13th September 2002, 07:56 AM   #2
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Is the rack also custom made?
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Old 13th September 2002, 02:00 PM   #3
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That one is Target I bought years ago. But recently I made this rack and like it very much.
It's 3" square still tubing (1/4" thick), with some shelves out of marble. It is virtualy resonance free. Some tubing is also a part of first floor support.
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Old 13th September 2002, 02:33 PM   #4
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Default Re: The importance of proper setup and vibrations control

Quote:
So my conclusion is, that the proper setup and mechanical interaction between equipment and supporting structure is as much important as circuits and parts implemented themselves. Try it and you might be surprised.
I remember being " " surprised when I put my LP deck on spikes and placed it on a granite platter directly bolted to the wall. Some time ago, just for the fun of it, I tried putting a wooden plate on the granite as a sandwich idea. It didn't last 5 minutes, sound was totally changed and not for the better - muffled and dark instead of transparant and dynamic. Most real-time CD-transports I have used are just as susceptible to mechanical environment as LP decks and strangely, even the subjective differences are alike.

I'm using a memory buffered multiread CD transport now. Susceptibility is largely gone, but still I can't find such a thing for my LPs

Remco
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Old 13th September 2002, 07:44 PM   #5
dice45 is offline dice45  Germany
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Peter,
you mamaged to surprise me! the three-spike-one-metal method i used with speakers for years, with big success. I used to place one metal spike under the front baffle center and two spikes or half sheres made from PVC or POM under the backside of the speaker and sonic improvement was as you descibe.

I also use this under my turntable. UNder the CD transport? Why not!
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Old 18th September 2002, 04:06 PM   #6
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Peter,

What is that tonearm on the white turntable, the one on the right? Is it a linear tracking arm? I'm interested in building a linear tracking tonearm, being inspired by the Ladegaard arm.

Cheers,
Ron
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Old 18th September 2002, 06:03 PM   #7
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The arm came with a TT, which is MapleNoll Ariadne. Both platter and arm are air bearing. By all that dust you can tell I wasn't using TT in a long time. I was recently thinking about selling it.
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Old 18th September 2002, 06:53 PM   #8
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Hi Peter,

Thanks for the info/photo. Can you post a couple more, the back side of the arm, maybe an overhead shot? I'm interested in building my own linear tracking tonearm.

Of course, I might be interested in buying your arm if you're selling for the right price I'm in Toronto as you are.

Cheers,
Ron
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Old 18th September 2002, 06:57 PM   #9
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I would be selling the whole thing (including compressor)and I expect around CAD 1,300. I post some pictures later. Is the arm based on ET?
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Old 18th September 2002, 07:35 PM   #10
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Peter,

Yes, it looks a bit like an ET arm. Thanks in advance for posting the pics.

Ron

p.s. the price is out of my budget
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