Drilling a PCB - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > General Interest > Everything Else

Everything Else Anything related to audio / video / electronics etc) BUT remember- we have many new forums where your thread may now fit! .... Parts, Equipment & Tools, Construction Tips, Software Tools......

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 1st September 2007, 05:06 PM   #1
KP11520 is offline KP11520  United States
diyAudio Member
 
KP11520's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Default Drilling a PCB

Hi All,

I have a quick question. When working with populated PCBs and wires tear out or other components don't desolder too well, is there any reason not to drill out the remaining junk?

I have tried using solder wick (braid with flux) and a desoldering pump but it doesn't get some of the remnants out.

I have, by trying to hard with heating again and again, removed some soldering pads. These were just anchors on the bottom side only holding in the component and not connecting to anything else. Maybe you have ideas how to remedy that too?

If drilling is ok, what size bit do I use to match what most manufacturers use for hole size in their production PCBs?

Thanks. Your experience is greatly appreciated!

Regards//Keith
__________________
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME ****, why didn't he just buy dinner?
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st September 2007, 05:10 PM   #2
Did it Himself
diyAudio Member
 
richie00boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Gloucestershire, England, UK
I think you will struggle to drill out rubbish as the hole size will be something like 0.7-0.8mm and if the bit encounters anything that pushes it off course it's likely to break. I've never had a problem removing stuff, a technique I use is to tap the board on the bench in an effort to bang stuff out. Then clean up with braid. I find solder suckers quite rubbish.

If you can't get the angle of the board right to tap (due to components etc), hold it firmly and whack your hand on the bench.
__________________
www.readresearch.co.uk my website for UK diy audio people - designs, PCBs, kits and more.
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st September 2007, 05:14 PM   #3
AndrewT is online now AndrewT  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Scottish Borders
Hi,
If these are plated through then drilling is likely to remove most of the plated through tube. It's that tube that gives a major increase in strength to the pad to substrate adherence.

Drills sizes are likely to be 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0mm. They may add on a bit for the plated through thickness to bring the usable diameter down to the wire sizes.
If you're in the US then all bets are off for equivalence in drill sizes.
__________________
regards Andrew T.
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st September 2007, 05:23 PM   #4
KP11520 is offline KP11520  United States
diyAudio Member
 
KP11520's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Hey Mates,

Thanks for the replies. We do import quite a bit from the rest of the world including the UK (like Jaguars, MGs and my favorite, the "Sunbeam Tiger"). We have metric bits here and they are becoming quite universal so I will purchase all three sizes.

When the PCBs are made, how do they line the barrel, with tinning or copper? Is it worth trying to replace the solder pad anchor?
__________________
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME ****, why didn't he just buy dinner?
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st September 2007, 05:26 PM   #5
Did it Himself
diyAudio Member
 
richie00boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Gloucestershire, England, UK
If you lose a pad, just bend the component lead to lay onto the track then solder it down. You will need to scrape of the resist if it's there. Pads come off because of too much messing with them and too much heat for too long. Clip leads away (to minimise heat input needed) and use the techniques I mentioned and you should have good success rates.

I'm not sure you understand how small 0.6mm is and trying to work at that level with hand or even manual bench tools!
__________________
www.readresearch.co.uk my website for UK diy audio people - designs, PCBs, kits and more.
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st September 2007, 05:39 PM   #6
AndrewT is online now AndrewT  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Scottish Borders
Hi,
I've become presbyopic (very long sighted) with age and I can still hand hold and drill with 0.4mm and bigger.
__________________
regards Andrew T.
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st September 2007, 05:39 PM   #7
KP11520 is offline KP11520  United States
diyAudio Member
 
KP11520's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
As I look through a piece of stripboard, I have an idea how small it is. I know what you mean about the bit wwandering off even with a drill press just because the bit is so small it remains flexible. It will, in many cases, go around rather than through. So the only way is with a very fresh bit, very slowly with a drill press with the board perpendicular to the bit and don't allow any movement.

Sounds like a last resort.

I am very interested in increasing my success rate, otherwise this would not be a hobby. It would be more like Purgatory!

I can use the bits for modifying PCBs and prototype and stripboards too. Thanks!

Andrew, I need a microscope on my head now like a Neurosurgeon!
__________________
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME ****, why didn't he just buy dinner?
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st September 2007, 05:43 PM   #8
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Canandaigua, NY USA
Please try to take this without offense, but there's something very wrong with your technique or your tools. Drilling is almost never the answer. If you don't have a fancy de-soldering station, and who does, you need an iron with good thermal capacity, but not excessive temperature. That generally rules out small tips. Nothing more than a 25W iron (or TC iron), and a flat or chisel tip of about 3/32". You need to apply solder and/or flux in order to quickly wet and remove the component, then finish up with braid or suction. I rarely use braid and don't really like the stuff- it's expensive and I tend to burn myself. Sometimes, however, it's the best choice. OTOH, all the common suction tools are absolutely useless except one. You have to have the large size "Soldapullt", model DS-017. The newer antistatic one, DP-200, is also ok, but doesn't seem quite as effective as the original. I have a drawer full of the small aluminum body types, and they're worthless. A small tipped iron that's too hot, plus one of those, is a recipe for board damage. Never try to remove an IC intact. Cut the leads, remove the body, then carefully remove each lead individually. Some very high end test equipment manufacturers have suggested not even removing components from their boards, but cutting out the body and soldering the new part to the old leads. My guess is they were thinking mostly of axial capacitors and larger resistors.
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st September 2007, 05:56 PM   #9
KP11520 is offline KP11520  United States
diyAudio Member
 
KP11520's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Hi Conrad,

No offense taken here. Thanks! The truth is always the best policy! I have a Hakko soldering station with a medium Soldering Iron and chisel tip. You are right about too much heat. as I went back and it stopped progressing I turned up the heat (I know, this is painful for you guys to witness). It was stranded wire that broke off and nothing was protruding from either side of the board. The solder was different on these two connections too, it was real hard and wouldn't melt! So now I have learned. Also the other place I had some trouble was removing the OPA627, I was trying to save it for re-use (somewhat expensive and damned near impossible to find anymore).

I think it is time to go garbage picking and practice on someone else's garbage instead of my own Electronics! Anyone throwing anything out?
__________________
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME ****, why didn't he just buy dinner?
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st September 2007, 06:59 PM   #10
Did it Himself
diyAudio Member
 
richie00boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Gloucestershire, England, UK
0.4mm Andrew and by hand too, I take my hat off to you. I forbid myself to go any smaller than 0.7mm and I use a dedicated PCB drill + stand. Then again I use carbide bits which have no flexibility whatsoever.

I find I get a vastly superior hole/finish with carbide than HSS.
__________________
www.readresearch.co.uk my website for UK diy audio people - designs, PCBs, kits and more.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
TO-3 Drilling Jig BrianDonegan Solid State 17 11th January 2014 05:33 PM
drilling pcbs impsick Chip Amps 70 12th November 2011 12:27 PM
Drilling Heatsinks wes-ninja250 Parts 7 29th September 2005 12:22 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 01:01 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2