Milling machine needs more power! - Page 2 - diyAudio
Go Back   Home > Forums > Design & Build > Equipment & Tools

Equipment & Tools From test equipment to hand tools

Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 5th January 2006, 11:22 PM   #11
poobah is offline poobah  United States
diyAudio Member
 
poobah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
We are not talking about any modifications at all. We are talking about an extension cord. I would have to assume that there are doors and hallways between the location of your mill and the dryer or stove. You can go through the walls if you must... but the doorways might be less destructive.

  Reply With Quote
Old 6th January 2006, 12:12 AM   #12
gl is offline gl  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Sierra Foothills - California
Another way? OK. Move.

GL
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th January 2006, 01:19 AM   #13
cowanrg is offline cowanrg  United States
diyAudio Member
 
cowanrg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Lafayette, CO
Send a message via AIM to cowanrg
Quote:
Originally posted by poobah
We are not talking about any modifications at all. We are talking about an extension cord. I would have to assume that there are doors and hallways between the location of your mill and the dryer or stove. You can go through the walls if you must... but the doorways might be less destructive.

well, the machine is in my basement, and the washer/dryer and stove are all on the opposite side of the house, up a level. i COULD run an extenstion cord, but it would be through 3 rooms, then up a flight of stairs, through 3 more rooms, and then to the outlet.

i guess it could work, but i was thinking maybe of upping the cap values or something. the UPS idea is nice too. thats all. if i MUST use a 220 outlet or something, i guess i could find a way. but i use this machine a LOT and id rather not have to hook up 100ft of extension cord to use it every time.


Quote:
Originally posted by gl
Another way? OK. Move.

GL
very very helpful. thanks for the post. i really appreciate it. an asset to the DIY community!
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th January 2006, 01:52 AM   #14
poobah is offline poobah  United States
diyAudio Member
 
poobah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
OK... so that's a hassle then... understood.

Upping the caps won't help... they are there to create a second phase... not start up power.

The UPS will cost you at least $2000... plus you need a 4kW ups to start a 2kW motor.

Now... this sounds crazy; take a spool or a pulley or something; and wind 4 ft of rope around your spindle. Pull it like an old fashioned lawnmower and THEN throw the switch. It's up to you to do this safely.

You can also put a centrifugal clutch on the motor spindle. This would allow the motor to spin-up to a good speed before trying to power the spindle and such. Here's a link:

http://www.blm-cm.com

There are cheaper models for mini bikes and go-karts you might be able to adapt.

The cheapest is to wire it in for 40 Amps... since you're in the basement it's a breeze. Do all of it yourself right up to breaker box in 3/4" conduit, and then have an electrician make the final hookup ($100?). Convince your landlord (Felix Ungar... not a tool guy) that a 220-240 outlet in the basement is a plus... because that's the truth.

Good luck,

BTW, the extension cord won't set you back much... and someone might get tired of seeing laying on the stairs etc... (war of gentle attrition).

  Reply With Quote
Old 6th January 2006, 02:55 AM   #15
cowanrg is offline cowanrg  United States
diyAudio Member
 
cowanrg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Lafayette, CO
Send a message via AIM to cowanrg
well, thanks for the info.

i DID fine a 2kva ups for around $250. shipping would definately add some money of course.

even though the machine is in my basement, its not as easy as you would think to wire it for a bigger circuit. its actually LONGER away than running an extension cord. the circuit breaker is on the outside of my house, to the back of the washer/dryer. so, its not as cake as you might think. PLUS, the room that the machine is in is the ONLY unfinished part of the basement, the rest is completely finished. so, not very easy. plus, i cant do it, i dont have permission

the pull-start is an interesting idea. it would take a bit of practice to get it to work though.

i wouldnt be able to permanently run the extension cord inside because not only would my roommate put a stop to it, but so would i. my house is relatively nice, and we like to keep it clean and picked up. an extension cord running through 5 rooms wouldnt be tolerated.

ill have to think it over a bit. i always thought the caps on the motor were for startup? arent they ac motor start caps?
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th January 2006, 03:24 AM   #16
poobah is offline poobah  United States
diyAudio Member
 
poobah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
They call them start caps... but that is mis-leading They are caps to provide a artificial phase so the motor will turn in the correct direction AND actually start moving in ANY direction at all. They don't give you a "start up" boost.

Don't be fooled by the "specs" on UPS... they are BS and won't start your motor. I have much experience with many different UPS & invertors. No one will talk about motor starting... don't bother. This was for the World Health Organization trying to make vaccine refridgerators function from a low cost invertor... again, don't bother.

Try the rope thing OR the "centrifugal clutch"... this is all that is open to you. Except for some proper wiring... sorry, you have physics in your way...



  Reply With Quote
Old 6th January 2006, 04:03 PM   #17
Schaef is offline Schaef  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Cuyahoga Falls, OH
Something's bothering me after reading this entire thread, and it could simply be my lack of knowledge with milling machines, but here goes:

On the three highest settings, the motor is stalling, which means, its not getting enough current to start the thing spinning. What this says to me is there's a problem somewhere, and I don't mean the electrical system. If it can't get enough torque to start the blade or bit spinning, its not going to have much torque once it gets going either. I'd look more at figuring out why it needs so much torque to start at the highest speeds, rather than trying to accomodate the higher power draw.

This is assuming its similar in design to something like my drill press, it spins freely on all of its settings, and has high torque, regardless of the speed settings. (Yes, I understand they're only similar, but work with me on this) Are you trying to spin a very large bit at these speeds? Why does it take so much torque to start the thing? Does it bog down easily? Are the highest speed settings towards the top/end of the spindles? If so, maybe you're over-tensioning the belt and its bending the spindles causing the higher torque requirements.

These are my thoughts, based upon a flimsy knowledge of milling machines. Feel free to tell me where I'm off my rocker.
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th January 2006, 04:11 PM   #18
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
cowanrg

What brand of mill is it? Is it possible that the motor has been replaced with a smaller HP motor? I spent thousands of hours running all types of mills. Do you have an amp clamp to check the current draw on the lower speeds?

Most of the Bridgeports I ran had 5 HP three phase motors on them.
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th January 2006, 04:31 PM   #19
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Racine, Wisconsin
Bridgeport Series II Special was 5HP

Series I step belts were 1 or 1-1/2.

That being said, I think the solution would be to add an AC variable drive to the existing motor. This would allow you to start the machine in the high speed belt position and increase the AC drive to max.

There's a motor shop in your community somewhere. They typically have somebody with a brain and a shelf with used **** that they could sell you.
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th January 2006, 06:03 PM   #20
EC8010 is offline EC8010  United Kingdom
diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
 
EC8010's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Near London. UK
Default Cold oil?

Hmmm. I had trouble with my mill a few weeks ago. It's only a toy mill (compared to a Bridgeport), but I found it had trouble starting on its highest speed, and took a little while to get up to full speed. As I was freezing my nadgers off at the time, I concluded that the oil in the gearbox was cold. Sure enough, when I used the mill the next day (and had turned the heating on), it ran happily immediately.
__________________
The loudspeaker: The only commercial Hi-Fi item where a disproportionate part of the budget isn't spent on the box. And the one where it would make a difference...
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Heavy Duty Workbench for Milling Machine Vikash Equipment & Tools 17 7th July 2009 01:23 PM
FS: 2-Axis PCB milling table Bakmeel Swap Meet 2 28th April 2009 09:15 PM
milling machine connection from dryer outlet millingmachine Equipment & Tools 16 8th January 2008 05:36 PM
Milling dead perpendicular bulgin Equipment & Tools 25 19th August 2006 02:56 AM
Milling Nixie Parts 17 19th July 2006 04:07 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 01:23 PM.


vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 1999-2014 diyAudio

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2