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Old 23rd February 2005, 11:49 PM   #11
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value for the money??

Ya... when they decide they want to sell some drills, they have very good prices. Is there a better drill made, absolutely. Is there a better drill at the same price when Craftsman go on sale? That's a much harder question.

The same holds true with routers. Clearly the standard of the industry is the Porter Cable. But Sears invented the router business... i.e., every average Joe could afford the Sears router.

Favorite drill? Milwaukee 1/2" Holeshooter, two speed, hammer drill. Brace yourself! You can run it so hard that it gets too hot to hold on to.

Favorite sander? Porter cable 5" DA with hook & loop.

Bacon grease? You bet. A standard practice. 4% lard in kerosene. Great for aluminum but there are better things for steel.
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Old 24th February 2005, 06:09 AM   #12
beedlo is offline beedlo  Canada
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Thanks for your input guys!
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Old 4th March 2005, 06:03 AM   #13
beedlo is offline beedlo  Canada
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All the sears drills are happen to be on sale right now. I ended up buying a cheapo craftsman.

Have any of you guys have trouble getting the tap to grip well enough in the chuck?
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Old 4th March 2005, 09:35 AM   #14
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You need to do the chuck up as tight as possible. If the tap slips, then after a few turns, enough heat usually generates to expand the tap enough for the chuck to grip it. If you are trying to tap 8mm, or 5/16"AF or larger, you may need to grind three flats (triangle) on the end of the tap. Unfortunately most of us have to do this by hand, (bench grinder) and damage can result to the chuck due to uneven loading. But a trades quality chuck can handle this.


Here is what I have learnt in 5 years of tapping with a pistol drill... up to 16mm in 4mm plate stainless steel... and frequently tapping diameter 4mm to 8mm in 10mm thick 316 stainless steel flat bar, and from 3mm to 8mm in aluminium

You have already bought a budget drill so your tap size is limited.

You need a sharp, high quality 'gun' tap for through holes, or a spiral flute machine tap.

For 'blind' holes, you need a spiral machine tap, so the chip comes out, like when you drill a hole.

Don't back up the drill, do the tapping in one operation, in and out. (Or you run the risk of breaking the tap if you accidently jerk it sideways from the torque-twist)

Use the speed that gives you a comprimise between good cut and good torque. (or the drill will stall) It is a feel thing. Hopefully you have a two speed gearbox, use the slow speed.

Let the drill and battery cool down if they get more than warm. Or you will shorten the life of both.

Use a good cutting oil. (not paste, as it blocks the flow of the chip)

try to square up the tap before you pull the trigger.

a good drill has at least 49Nm of torque.

This is just my advice, and it is different to what others have already written, so it is up to you to consider how you want to do it, and for you to learn from your own experience... but you probably already have before I even wrote this!
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Old 4th March 2005, 12:44 PM   #15
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loonatron is correct on the tap slipage... after 1/4 it depends on the chuck and the material. A keyed chuck will be tighter. Otherwise, you really have to crank on a keyless chuck.

Make sure you are spending real money on real taps... the price is directly proportional to the quality and ease of cutting. You are not using four flute "hand" taps are you? You can't buy a decent tap in a hardware story or a grocery. Stop at you local industrial supply store.

Spiral taps are covered in the advanced class!
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Old 6th March 2005, 02:24 PM   #16
speaker is offline speaker  United States
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Default Re: Cordless Drill Guns for tapping

Quote:
Originally posted by beedlo
I am quite intrigued after reading Peter Daniel's posts on tapping with a cordless drill gun with a clutch.
A cheap (under $75) Chinese benchtop drill-press might also be an option for you. I use the drill-press as a tapping frame. The tap is chucked in & held 90-degrees to the work, you drop the quill w/ tap into the hole to be tapped, & manually turn the chuck by hand. For 1/4" or less aluminum, you can generate enough torque to easily go through it. If I need to tap something thicker & need more leverage (so far I haven't), I'd get a pin spanner to go into one of the chuck-key holes. The nice thing about doing it this way is that you can clamp your work to the table or make a jig to hold it.

Note, you do not turn the drill press on to do this operation!

speaker
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Old 14th March 2005, 01:57 AM   #17
beedlo is offline beedlo  Canada
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I have followed some of the advices in this post, and I have been tapping quite successfully. Althought I was unable to find a spiral fluted tap until it was too late (*after* I got a normal hand tap); The hand tap was still sufficient however.

I have tried two methods to help myself tap square. One was to use a drill guide I made with two thin sheets of aluminum. It worked well. But I find that every hole I tapped with the guide, the guide would enlarge quite a bit. Perhaps a guide made with thicker, harder sheets, and some better fit bits would perform better.

The second method I used was with this:
Wolfcraft Drill guide (without the angle adjustments)

Tapping flat surfaces was very easy with this gadget. I am still thinking if it would be possible to use this drill guide to tap the end of a bar however...


There are two sizes that I am tapping with, M3 and M6. Tapping M3 holes was quite easy with the cordless drill; all my M3 tapping went through in one run. Tapping M6 proved to be a little more challenging. Occasionally, the tap would jam and I would have to back the tap up entirely and clean it. I use a nasty but effective solvent, Toyota Brake Cleaner, to quickly clean my taps. I strongly believe that brake cleaner should be added to the 'build the world' items like duct tape and zip tie.

I understand that thread damage may occur when attempting to back out. What are some says to limit thread damage? How do I knwo the thread is damaged?

Again, thank you for all the help!
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Old 14th March 2005, 02:34 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally posted by beedlo
I understand that thread damage may occur when attempting to back out. What are some says to limit thread damage? How do I knwo the thread is damaged?
Actually, if you use lubricant, you shouldn't damage thread when backing out. I'm backing out whenever I feel resistance, and all my threads seem to be fine. When the thread is damaged, at certain torque value, the screw will not hold and will go loose. There are still ways to fix it up though.
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Old 14th March 2005, 04:14 AM   #19
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>>>snip

the tap would jam and I would have to back the tap

How many flutes on that M6? Flutes are like _______. One's not enough and three's too many.
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Old 14th March 2005, 05:40 AM   #20
ROVSING is offline ROVSING  Denmark
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This might help to choose the right drillsize.....
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