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Old 5th September 2004, 09:29 PM   #1
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Default 10 Mhz Scope enought ??

Evening all,

I have been offered a 2nd hand scope (Advance OS250) rated at 10 Mhz, which is kinda slow compared to today’s standards, but.....

Is there any reason why one would want a higher frequency scope for audio work (amplifiers etc.)??

Should be able to trigger even on the 44 KHz of CD - or am I missing something here.....??

Any specific comments on the Advance OS250 scope (pros/cons, what to look for etc.)

I'm awaiting education from you all.

Thanks in advance

Regards
Henrik Juhl
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Old 5th September 2004, 09:32 PM   #2
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Default Re: 10 Mhz Scope enought ??

Quote:
Originally posted by Henrik Juhl
Is there any reason why one would want a higher frequency scope for audio work (amplifiers etc.)??
Well, a 10MHz 'scope may not be fast enough to catch some high frequency oscillations but for basic stuff, it should be fine.

se
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Old 5th September 2004, 09:34 PM   #3
OliverD is offline OliverD  Germany
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I don't know this particular model, but a 10 MHz bandwidth is normally enough for (analog) audio.

For digital audio, with clocks in the 10 - 100 MHz range, you need more.
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Old 5th September 2004, 09:41 PM   #4
UrSv is offline UrSv  Sweden
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It'd be easier to comment if you tell us the price you've been offered.
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Old 5th September 2004, 09:47 PM   #5
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Around €110 including an (as of yet) unknown 0-800 kHz function generator (Sine/Square) reportedly of 'good quality'.

Scope has been retired for some years and is reported to have 'very good contrast'

Will see for myself tomorrow
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Old 5th September 2004, 09:59 PM   #6
UrSv is offline UrSv  Sweden
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Not bad but not spectacular. Normally you should be able to pick something up on Ebay for less money with better specs. Good thing is that you can check that it works OK before buying. If both units are working OK I would feel OK to pick it up even if I would feel that a bit lower would be reasonable.
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Old 6th September 2004, 05:21 AM   #7
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Some people on here were saying to get at least 20mhz.


and yeah you can probably get something nicer on ebay.. although the signal generator is probably worth a few bucks.
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Old 6th September 2004, 05:27 AM   #8
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At that price level you can purchase a good, 50 or 100 MHz B&K or Hitachi scope on EBay and have it shipped to Copenhagen.

Bandwidth is nice to have, but you really have to decide what end you want to pursue. There's no need for most DIYr;s to purchase 400 MHz.scopes -- one of the most useful scopes I have is an old Tektronix 5113 with a 5A22n differential amplifier plug-in -- even after 30 years in service you can measure the noise of many power supplies at levels which many modern scopes can't attain unassisted.

Buy at least one good set of probes for your scope -- they don't have to be very expensive, but of a reliable manufacturer. Bad probing leads to bad analysis.
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Old 14th October 2004, 10:22 AM   #9
tekman is offline tekman  Germany
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The os250 is a VERY old scope (approx mid 60's to mid 70's, sorry I can't remeber more precise).

Gould scopes of this vintage are failure prone: switches go bad, spare parts hard to get. Trigger is a little bit nasty to get stable.

If you a paying a 110 euro, I would not do so. You get a 30 MHz 2 ch analog vintage 1998 for 260, which serves you better and wil be more "up to date" (see posting here about the digital or the one from Steve Eddy).

You definetely do not need to go for a > 300Mhz scope for the beginning, this will be more in the 600 - 700 euro range. Or if you have an unlimeted budget

But for settign up you basic workbench, I would not recommend to go for very aged equipment: If your os250 gets fried, you will be in a helpless situation (if you don't have quite expierenced people around who can repair the old scopes from Gould).

So (my personal view):
1. Look for a scope not too old.
2. Check if manual is included.
3. check if probe is included or at least: can be used with "every probe".
4. check if there is some kind of "scope works indication": A valid calibration shows that the previous owner has taken care that the scopes readings are reliable. Or ask for other warranties.
5. check if there is some kind of Service, help in case of accidental scope failure, etc. -- so you won't be lost.
6. Be careful with so looking bargains (e.g. ebay): Everything in the market has it's price. If a deal sounds too good to be true, than it is usually not good enough.

Ok, if you are stil on the search, send me a personal mail (I think it might get too off-topic here, so the exception for PM) - I see you are too located in europe, so I might be able to help.


hth,
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Old 14th October 2004, 01:18 PM   #10
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Unless you need to measure digital signals, 10MHz is enough. Heck, I worked in TV shops that never had more than a 2MHz Heathkit. I still use a 2MHz scope. If I need to measure HF, I just haul out the old double-balanced mixer and away we go!
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