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Old 11th June 2002, 03:31 PM   #21
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Default More metal cutting

For anything that doesn't fit my mitre saw I'm using that setup. I bought that table long time ago at Canadian Tire and although desined for wood cutting it works great with metals. I'm using 7.5" circular saw which can slide above the table. I clamp aluminum pieces to the table. I was cutting 1" thick aluminum pieces as well as 2" thick heat sinks without a problem. When a piece is thicker I do two or three runs to complete the cut. Don't forget about the safety glasses.
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Old 11th June 2002, 03:40 PM   #22
dice45 is offline dice45  Germany
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Default Flux

All,
recently fell i love with using flux. For desoldering and butchering. It did never appeal to me that i have to add solder to a solder joint i want to clean from solder. Just to ensure thermic contact and to add flux.

So i bought a can of non-halogenic flux. I apply just a few drops on any SJ i want to open and desolder, mostly using a conductive Soldapullt DS017LS desolder pump (this very model !!!) or solder wick. And flux. Works better than using solder.

Solder dispenser: i like the Weller ones, leave the hands free and the mouth, too (i can hold a torch between my teeth if needed). Nevertheless have to try out said solder dispenser. Thanx, HPotter!

Cleaning the iron: i have a ceramic stand with a small bathtub and some disc-shaped silicone sponges mounted over the tub in vertical orientation. The sponges are kept wet by water in the tub and the iron tip is moved between the sponge discs and cleaned thoroughly.
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Old 11th June 2002, 04:18 PM   #23
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Default Cutting Blade

Thanks guys for the flux advise.

HPotter,

Don't you have to worry about the heat that might get generated on the saw blade when cutting/drilling metal. When I was a little kid I saw my father at his work place that he used some milky white liquid dripping onto the stock metal and the cutter blade, what do you call those very very hard pointing bar that scrap the metal away thin layer by thin layer. I recall he said the milky liquid is for cooling. Those machine were big though he said the motor on it was like 5 HP and the thing is like 10 feet long. The key he used to turn the jaw clamp was like the size of the cross bar to change flat tires.

Chris
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Old 11th June 2002, 04:49 PM   #24
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I'm not worried about heat because my average cut doesn't last longer than 10 seconds.

Regarding flux, it is also helpful in removing excess solder your joint might contain. After flux "tratment" only the minimum amount of solder is left and the joint looks "professional".
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Old 12th June 2002, 11:41 AM   #25
dice45 is offline dice45  Germany
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Default Cutting emulsion

Chris,

you ask about that milky fluid. It is cutting emulsion, a mixture form a special oil and water, ratio 1:5 to 1:15. It is meant for cooling and greasing the cutting tool as well as for preventing the cooling agent making the machine's metal corrode.

The cutting edges you adress are bars made from sintered tungsten carbide, then brazed into place and finally ground to shape. The edge shape for wood cutting purposes is considerably different to shapes for metal cutting. Metal cutting blades usually have alternating shapes, every one roof-shaped and every other rectangular.
Also the type of tungsten carbide is a different one for wood and for metal, due to different requirements for stiffness and brittleness/elasticity
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Old 13th June 2002, 03:08 PM   #26
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Here is a simple way to drill straight holes at the end of a rod or similar part. No vice needed and if you lubricate the drill bit you don't even have to clamp the part to the block but simply hold it with your hand. I'm using stainless still block but you can easily make it out of wood. That's what I call simple, fast and precise.
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Old 13th June 2002, 09:21 PM   #27
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There was a question how to cut square holes for AC jack and switch. I found the switch that has the same width as AC jack and I put it directly above the jack so I have to open just one square hole. Since most of my panels are usually 1/4" doing it by hand would be pretty hard. I used many different methods before, but found out that those 2 tools are most handy for the job. To start the hole I drill 1/4" holes in ea. corner of the square. Final trim is done by hand and a file.
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Old 13th June 2002, 10:04 PM   #28
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Was at Home Depot last weekend and noticed this circle cutter in the tool section...

Seems to me that this would be very good for loudspeaker baffles...

I've already got the Rotozip so I'll try the attachment and report back... I can vouch for the Rotozip - very handy to have around for all sorts of stuff...

Rotozip $60

http://www.rotozip.com/whatis.phtml

Circle Cutter 2 (the larger one - range 1" - 20") $24

http://www.rotozip.com/attachments/circlecutters.phtml

If anyone cuts their baffles (or anything else) with the circle cutter, I'd be interested in knowing how it works before buying one...

Thx,

Steve
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Old 13th June 2002, 10:11 PM   #29
Apogee is offline Apogee  United States
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Question HPotter

What are the numbers of teeth on your non-ferrous blades? The compound blade looks to be made by Freud; how pleased are you with their blades for this purpose? Would you buy another?

How smooth are the cuts using this method?

This method looks far easier and faster than my bandsaw... Why didn't I think of this!!!!

Thx,

Steve
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Old 13th June 2002, 10:43 PM   #30
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Here is the cut I just did. The size was 3x2", time: 3 seconds. the Non Ferrous Blade is made by Freud and has 74 teeth. There is no better way to cut aluminum extrusions at home.
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