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Old 24th September 2012, 02:58 PM   #1
imagios is offline imagios  Czech Republic
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Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: prague
Default Dremel Trio ... sufficient tool?

Hello Folks,
Im looking for a suitable tool for a DIYer living in a city flat...
The last speakers I have build where based on drawings and the wood cutting was done by a local company for me, this time I would preffer to do it my self, one reason is the price a second the feeling, its just something else if its done by your self

Now my issue, I need a tool that is able to handle 1inch high quality MDF boards, it should cut holes, for speakers up to 12 inches...
F I work in the kitchen, I do not see the router as a suitable tool to work with in the kitchen, although, should I have a garden or garage I would definitely go for that.
I was looking around the web, and found no real substitute, but one thing seems to be a option, the Dremel Trio:Dremel Trio? / Model: 6800

Does have someone any experience with that? My concern is the depth and power...
Any recommendations...
Thanks,
Daniel
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Old 25th September 2012, 05:20 AM   #2
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I don't own one but had the pleasure of using one. Would I get one though?

No.

But that is me, I have a house, garage, and a driveway. I have space and I have tools which are more powerful and versatile.

I digress. The Dremel Trio is a mini mini router. Plain and simple. I tried it at my friend's house on some nice Norwiegan White Birch plywood that was supposed to turn into parts of a small speaker box like housing for a flip digit clock and radio -- about the size of two Tivoli Model One radios side by side for a rough estimate. Simple cuts for sides, window, 3 inch speakers, mounting holes, access holes, and holes for various buttons and dials. Nothing curved or wavy other than the two speaker holes and vent.

Started off by breaking the first multipurpose bit (supposed to be able to cut and drill). Put on another bit used to cut the sides. After the first two cuts with the Dremel, we switched to a circular saw with a nice blade to reduce chipping. Those first two cuts with the Dremel were very clean, nice, and chip free, but slow and nerve wracking in that I didn't want to break another bit. The saw was faster but a little because of the speed and resistance of the blade with the same results of a good clean cut, only minus the nerves and worry.

The Dremel started up again for one speaker hole with my friend at the helm. Another bit went snap and we were stuck without router bit... We weren't sure if it was the material or the pressure or the tool bogging down from lack of torque. I grabbed my Bosch Colt from the car and hooked it up to finish the job. The difference was evident from the start, the Bosch did not bog down or slow down in speed much spinning wise and routed much easier without worry.

Now we would have used the Dremel with some of my spare roter bits i had for the Bosch, but the problem with the Dremel was that it uses a proprietary smaller sized diameter bit and doesn't take the 1/4 inch standard bits. So that was something we did not expect (and had my friend known, he would have thought twice about it), so if you get the Dremel, you have to buy Dremel bits.

That Dremel sized bit was the deal killer for me because I have two routers (the Bosch and a hand me down fixed base Ryobi which found a home in a router table) that use 1/4 inch bits. I have both good and cheap bits that I purchased on sale here and there at different stores and garage sales. Sometimes, you just need that certain profile, so you go out and buy it. In the end, you tend to chose the appropriate bit for the job you are tasked with. I can chose the Bosch Colt when I want to freehand or run it along a straight edge or put what I need routed on a router table and attack it with the Ryobi. Can't do that with the Dremel.

The Dremel would probably be better for smaller jobs like finer detail work or plunge cuts on softer woods or on thinner stock, but on half an inch of plywood it didn't shine too well.

The Bosch Colt cost me $175 plus tax on sale up here I Canada many years ago. I think it is the same price or so still.

My two cents. Good luck and hope that this helps you in making a decision.
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Old 25th September 2012, 05:24 AM   #3
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Oh yeah, I forgot to mention this, you are saying 1 inch high quality MDF?

I don't think that the Dremel bits will cut that deep, but better check out the specs and different bits you can buy on the Dremel website than to trust me.
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Old 25th September 2012, 12:02 PM   #4
imagios is offline imagios  Czech Republic
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Yea the tools should go thru 1inch MDF, or at least 3/4...
from what you describe and from the reviews I found it might not be the right tool for me, it seems I will need to go for a router,...
I the Bosh you describe sounds nice, I have to check the avealibility in EU.
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Old 25th September 2012, 12:29 PM   #5
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The Bosch is a trim router so it is smaller and can be one-handed. Porter Cable, Dewalt, and there are few other companies out there make them too. I bought it for light work, but tend to use it for some big jobs in tight places (lighter and smaller for manouvering and using it on installed pieces), but that is me. For big work, I will still go to the router table and bigger router for speed and easier usage and straighter cuts. Plunge cutting, I end up using the Bosch because it is light keeping in mind I have to use it like a small router than a full sized one (it can get away from you if not careful).

You could probably last with the one smaller because of size of your living space but like all routers, there can be a lot of dust made. Read reviews and form your opinion on how much you will use it, where, and your own ability.

Good luck!
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Old 25th September 2012, 12:49 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imagios View Post
Hello Folks,
Im looking for a suitable tool for a DIYer living in a city flat...
The last speakers I have build where based on drawings and the wood cutting was done by a local company for me, this time I would preffer to do it my self, one reason is the price a second the feeling, its just something else if its done by your self

Now my issue, I need a tool that is able to handle 1inch high quality MDF boards, it should cut holes, for speakers up to 12 inches...
F I work in the kitchen, I do not see the router as a suitable tool to work with in the kitchen, although, should I have a garden or garage I would definitely go for that.
I was looking around the web, and found no real substitute, but one thing seems to be a option, the Dremel Trio:Dremel Trio? / Model: 6800

Does have someone any experience with that? My concern is the depth and power...
Any recommendations...
Thanks,
Daniel
I bought a small Makita router with 4 different feet a little while ago. Not cheap, around 350 Euro's, but highly recommendable for speaker building. It seems a well built little machine that runs virtually vibrationless. With a good vacuum cleaner attached, dust is very well controlled.

vac
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Old 25th September 2012, 10:50 PM   #7
imagios is offline imagios  Czech Republic
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OK it seems a small router is may be the best option, the colt is not sold in Europa, its quite cheap in US, but the customs and taxes and freight would make it cost twice so much...
The 350 Eur Makita is a way above my budged,... but Im certain I will find a nice small durable option that will be affordable
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Old 26th September 2012, 11:00 AM   #8
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See if Festool or Freud sell any in Europe -- those are the expensive Euro models over here because they are imports. Or check out the Bosch website to see what model is sold in your country.
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Old 26th September 2012, 01:17 PM   #9
imagios is offline imagios  Czech Republic
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Well I really envy you in the US and Canada, the part are there so much cheaper, even those produced in Europe... and you have much more choices...

I dont knew what a pain will it be to buy one of those routers, Ok would I have hundrets of euros to go it would be easier, but to get a decent tool in Europe for about up to 150 USD that is a real chalenge, non of them so far deliverd decent performance,... still looking for one.
The Festools are really expensive
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Old 26th September 2012, 02:31 PM   #10
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Don't envy us in over here because were envying you being over there. We always want what others have (until we live there). Choice and inventory over here is a myth in Canada, I had to run to a three of the same chain of Home depot before I can find stock to get two RIGID worm drive circular saws (I have given up on sidewinders, burn them out one after another and bending over the other way to see what you are cutting is the pits).

Wow. I wonder why that pricing is so bad over there? Can't be because of the 110 to 220 voltage changes because personally I dislike some of the size tools we have compared to the European/Asian similar tools (I picked up a circular saw in Hong Kong once and it was very noticeable lighter because of smaller electric motor because of higher voltage, lower amperage, smaller wires/windings, thinner cord to the wall, running cooler, as I was told).

On Festools, trust me Festools here is very expensive compared to Skil, DeWalt (which is Black and Decker/Stanley Tools), Ryobi, and others... If I had the coin, I would totally grab a few of their tools. They just seem to be solid built and sensible.

With that said, if I had to get a tool and had the time and knowledge of the tool and wood, I would get a router. I could do away with a lot of my tools with that one router. My friend's father (I think I told this story before in another thread) has nothing but a router (well a couple of them) and would rather pick up a router than a drill, table saw (he has one, but for long boards and making bed headboards), jigsaw, handsaw, or anything. He said talking to me, "...I could do what your do with all my tools with a single router, better, faster, and a whole lot more dustier."

And I believe him as he makes furniture for a serious hobby and wicked looking tables with joinery that is out of this world. That and his probably 45+ years of experience makes my work look second rate and cheap.

Then there is my in-law's neighbour, also another router guy and he is only 50 years old or so. Same thing, but in 1/4 inch router only (he never changed to the 3/8 shank like my friend's father did) and he does make some nice stuff too.

I will also add, that they both agree that you need hearing protection, a dust mask, patience, and watch a lot of TV with router people talking about routers (Youtube for me). Never, never, never, buy tired looking used/second-hand router (too many problems). The only time you buy a second-hand router is when the person you buy it from didn't use it for more than a few hours and gave up on it early because of lack of skill and patience.

See if there are any woodcrafter/furniture maker/powertool shows in your area coming up soon. Sometimes there are "show specials" from the manufacturers near the end of the show so they don't have to lug all that unsold stock back with them home. I got a lot of my good bits and base plate attachments by bargaining with cash. The tools would have been cheaper there than at Home Depot or Lowes here.
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